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Soundgarden

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Someday, the rock-and-roll world will appreciate what a jewel it has in Soundgarden. The Seattle quartet, whose Down on the Upside quietly came and went earlier this year, has just about perfected its intricate, post-grunge take on heavy rock. Balancing pure guitar muscle with agile syncopations, the band achieves both power and grace with a precision that should be the envy of every arena band. Its songs are operatic in scope, yet articulate personal anguish and universal fears without feeling sanctimonious or distant.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Soundgarden doesn't have a rock-star frontman like Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder. It doesn't boast a tragic-artist type like Nirvana's Kurt Cobain. It doesn't even possess the scrounge appeal of the Screaming Trees or Tad - in fact, the readers of Sassy magazine last year voted Soundgarden "America's ugliest band. " But in the latest round of the rock wars, this Seattle quartet has an equally powerful weapon: Curiosity. Superunknown, its fourth full-length album and the first record of 1994 that can be considered a classic on arrival, is a redefinition of hard rock's perimeters, a mosaic of surging riffs, swirling psychedelia and cathartic choruses that make most so-called heavy music seem trifling by comparison.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soundgarden is single-handedly revolutionizing heavy metal. In the beginning, when Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple first reworked the blues, the music's appeal was universal. But since the early '70s, the genre has spoken mostly to suburban teenage boys. At the Tower Theater on Thursday, Soundgarden reclaimed heavy metal for the masses. The work of heavy metal's pioneers remains the bedrock of the Seattle quartet's tunes. Approximately half of Thursday's show was devoted to that older, simpler material.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Make your summer entertainment plans now. Tickets go on sale this weekend for Philadelphia area shows of some of the pop world's biggest acts. Justin Timberlake and Jay-Z swing through town on August 13 for a double header Citizen's Bank Park. Get your tix on Thursday, Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. Bruno Mars hits the Wells Fargo Center on June 24 with Fitz & the Tantrums . Tix on sale Friday, March 1 at 10 a.m. Also coming to the region (with tickets on sale Friday)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Soundgarden is not your average dim-bulb heavy metal band. Yes, they're dark as night, loud as rage, thick as sludge. Sure, their lead vocalist wails with a horrific frenzy, and their guitar player sets up a harrowing, screeching howl. They also pound the beat into your brain like a carpenter driving four-inch nails. And yeah, their lyrics are rude and sometimes patently offensive. One song repeatedly wails "gonna kill your mother. " Another uses the 'f' word at least 32 times, although these guys claim they do it for comic effect, as a parody of all the lurid disco songs that "beat around the bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
What raged in the '90s - the post-Zeppelin grunge-metal of Soundgarden, the crepuscular industrial firestorm of Nine Inch Nails - still seethes today. Each act's latest album (Soundgarden's King Animal of 2012 and Nine Inch Nails' Hesitation Marks of 2013) is a crisp representation of the past refreshed for the present. Wednesday night's concert featuring both bands at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center suggested that that present has a bright future. Soundgarden lead vocalist Chris Cornell sounded fresh and forward-looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Chris Cornell, lead singer of the now-defunct Soundgarden, brought lofty ambitions to his first solo effort, Euphoria Morning. With tightly focused compositions, he set out to channel his old band's ominous roar and sprawling complexity into more reflective environments. He sought a rock attack distinguished by nuance, and wrote melodies that balanced arty pretension against easily discernible hooks. His performance Friday at the Tower Theater demonstrated the wisdom - and shortcomings - of that shift in direction.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | by Jim Farber, New York Daily News
TEMPLE OF THE DOG Temple of the Dog A&M MOTHER LOVE BONE Mother Love Bone Mercury SINGLES Soundtrack Epic Hurrah for creative infidelity! Musicians owe it to themselves to break away from their bands and sonically sleep around with other great players, making for ever more creative unions. In the '60s, when promiscuity made a political statement, such practices were the norm. With dizzying regularity, superstars such as Stevie Winwood, Eric Clapton, Leon Russell and Delaney & Bonnie commingled on albums, while similar trysts were feverishly enacted on the West Coast between members of Jefferson Airplane, CSN&Y and the Dead.
NEWS
July 31, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
When grunge-god-turned-metal-howler Chris Cornell announced that he was touring solo and doing hits from all his bands, it conjured up the notion of something akin to lounge music, smooth Muzak versions of Soundgarden and Audioslave songs. Perhaps even something you'd call "The Chris Cornell Experience" in which a 43-year-old once in possession of a fine pencil mustache would croon Temple of the Dog tunes from upon a stool rather than bark at the moon. Cornell just pulled off the theme song to James Bond's Casino Royale.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Full-bodied exhibitionism, swan dives into the crowd, microphones smashed into pieces, and climbing expeditions up the speakers onto the second level of the club. That was the bands. Violent slam-dancing, 30 feet of metal railing ripped down, people thrown into bouncers, and leaps from the balcony onto the stage. That was the fans. Oh yeah, there was music, too. Speed-metal, space-metal, rap-metal, punk- metal and good ol' thrash. Monday's performance at the Trocadero, a Center City nightclub, was but a preview of what, on Feb. 11, will become a Sunday-evening series of all-age metal shows featuring national acts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
What raged in the '90s - the post-Zeppelin grunge-metal of Soundgarden, the crepuscular industrial firestorm of Nine Inch Nails - still seethes today. Each act's latest album (Soundgarden's King Animal of 2012 and Nine Inch Nails' Hesitation Marks of 2013) is a crisp representation of the past refreshed for the present. Wednesday night's concert featuring both bands at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center suggested that that present has a bright future. Soundgarden lead vocalist Chris Cornell sounded fresh and forward-looking.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Make your summer entertainment plans now. Tickets go on sale this weekend for Philadelphia area shows of some of the pop world's biggest acts. Justin Timberlake and Jay-Z swing through town on August 13 for a double header Citizen's Bank Park. Get your tix on Thursday, Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. Bruno Mars hits the Wells Fargo Center on June 24 with Fitz & the Tantrums . Tix on sale Friday, March 1 at 10 a.m. Also coming to the region (with tickets on sale Friday)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With its mix of maudlin metal, earthen psychedelia, and animalistic punk done up in complex chord changes, Soundgarden was an anomaly on the American music scene of the '90s. While grunge-era gods Nirvana and Pearl Jam played it noisily or straight, Soundgarden made a racket, sure, but made it sing and swing, racking up platinum album sales for their troubles. Topped by Chris Cornell's powerfully primal howl and emotionally tortured lyrics, guitarist Kim Thayil, drummer Matt Cameron, and bassist Hunter "Ben" Shepherd could do no wrong and went out on top when they disbanded in 1997.
NEWS
July 31, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
When grunge-god-turned-metal-howler Chris Cornell announced that he was touring solo and doing hits from all his bands, it conjured up the notion of something akin to lounge music, smooth Muzak versions of Soundgarden and Audioslave songs. Perhaps even something you'd call "The Chris Cornell Experience" in which a 43-year-old once in possession of a fine pencil mustache would croon Temple of the Dog tunes from upon a stool rather than bark at the moon. Cornell just pulled off the theme song to James Bond's Casino Royale.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Chris Cornell, lead singer of the now-defunct Soundgarden, brought lofty ambitions to his first solo effort, Euphoria Morning. With tightly focused compositions, he set out to channel his old band's ominous roar and sprawling complexity into more reflective environments. He sought a rock attack distinguished by nuance, and wrote melodies that balanced arty pretension against easily discernible hooks. His performance Friday at the Tower Theater demonstrated the wisdom - and shortcomings - of that shift in direction.
LIVING
September 7, 1998 | By W. Speers FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, People and the New York Daily News
Louise Woodward is being deluged by suitors, receiving about 50 marriage proposals along with cards, flowers and candy since the au pair's return to England from America after her manslaughter conviction. "I tend to get a lot of gifts from them, valentine things like flowers and chocolates," Woodward said yesterday in the Sunday Times. "You always get people who see a picture or your face on TV and fall in love with it. They tend to keep my photograph by their bed. " The 20-year-old returned home in June after a Massachusetts court upheld her involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of an 8-month-old baby who died of head injuries in 1997 while in her care.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If four guys are going to get along in a rock band, they have to learn to take it from each other as well as dish it out, especially if two of them are prep school grads and the other two own Harleys. The members of Velvet figure they have the chemistry part licked. So when they're not trying to keep lead vocalist Bill Montgomery in line - "Bill's got diarrhea of the mouth," says drummer Dave DiMaggio - they work on the music. Maybe the music part is coming together, too. Last month, Velvet was one of four bands to win Billboard Live's Demo Derby, a worldwide competition conducted over the Internet, and last week the band traveled to Los Angeles to compete in a playoff concert at the Billboard Live club on Sunset Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Someday, the rock-and-roll world will appreciate what a jewel it has in Soundgarden. The Seattle quartet, whose Down on the Upside quietly came and went earlier this year, has just about perfected its intricate, post-grunge take on heavy rock. Balancing pure guitar muscle with agile syncopations, the band achieves both power and grace with a precision that should be the envy of every arena band. Its songs are operatic in scope, yet articulate personal anguish and universal fears without feeling sanctimonious or distant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soundgarden is single-handedly revolutionizing heavy metal. In the beginning, when Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple first reworked the blues, the music's appeal was universal. But since the early '70s, the genre has spoken mostly to suburban teenage boys. At the Tower Theater on Thursday, Soundgarden reclaimed heavy metal for the masses. The work of heavy metal's pioneers remains the bedrock of the Seattle quartet's tunes. Approximately half of Thursday's show was devoted to that older, simpler material.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
SINATRA AND SEXTET: LIVE IN PARIS Frank Sinatra / Reprise Frank Sinatra's "live" albums have been relatively few, and almost without exception they have not attained the high standards of his studio work. This album, recorded on June 5, 1962, in performance at the Lido in Paris and just now released commercially, pretty much sticks to the pattern. The CD will nonetheless be pursued by avid Sinatra collectors because it's that rare bird, a live representation of the singer backed by a small combo, a sextet including such familiar Sinatra acolytes as pianist Bill Miller, guitarist Al Viola, drummer Irv Cottler, vibist Emil Richards and reedman Harry Klee, plus a newcomer, the late bassist Ralph Pena.
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