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FOOD
May 15, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On sunny weekend afternoons, in the shadow of an ornate, golden Buddhist temple, Mifflin Square in South Philadelphia is dotted with charcoal grills, chile-lacquered chicken wings, and thin-sliced fatty beef heavily seasoned with lemongrass sputtering over the coals. Women pound chilies, garlic, and dried shrimp to a paste to season the snappy unripe papaya for the lime-drenched salads they sell to passersby. This is what some people call Cambodia Town, where these authentic street foods sell for $1, and where there's an effort afoot to make the title official.
FOOD
January 8, 1995 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
What's my secret for getting through a busy week and still serving healthy meals? Spending Sunday afternoon cooking soup. My grandmother kept a stockpot simmering on the back burner on Sunday afternoons. She'd add leftover vegetables during the week's cooking, fresh bits of herbs, a dash of salt. By evening she'd have a rich broth, low in fat and high in flavor. It became the substance of the next week's soup. Soups seem deceptively simple to make, but creating a truly flavorful pot is a test of any cook's skill.
FOOD
February 19, 1986 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
When it's bone-chilling cold and fingertips are numb, there are few things more warming than a steaming mug of homemade soup. Sure, you say, but who has time to chop, stir and simmer for hours? The kind of soup we think of with nostalgia does indeed involve chopping, stirring and simmering for hours. But there is a way to come close without the time- consuming steps associated with traditional soupmaking. Take, for example, a package of instant soup mix. We may look on it with disdain - and with good reason.
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Did you hear just how cold it was on Soup Sunday for the Mummers? So cold that the soup wasn't hot, that ice formed in the beer, and that the cold snap snapped banjo strings. "The cold tightens the strings on banjos. The strings lose their flexibility and tend to snap - like this one just did," explained Jack Brennan, a banjo player for the Fralinger String Band, as he made an emergency repair. Bill Bowen Jr., Fralinger's captain, said: "No matter how cold, we have to drill outside so our guys get a good feel for the street.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Little Pumpkin has grown up so much in the last seven years, it received an upgrade to three bells last week. The tiny BYO's dining room has undergone a handsome makeover, with salvaged planks on the wall, antique tin on the ceiling, and a couple fewer seats, giving the remaining 26 more breathing room. But it's the addition of talented chef de cuisine Christopher Kearse to co-owner Ian Moroney's kitchen that has ratcheted the culinary ambition here to new highs - and a surprisingly elegant embrace of molecular gastronomy.
FOOD
March 14, 2013
Makes 8 servings 1/4 cup olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 3 carrots, peeled and chopped 4 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped 5 thyme sprigs 1 bay leaf 2 teaspoons salt 3 cups water 1 cup broccoli florets 3 medium zucchini, cut into small dice 1 can (15.5 ounce) diced    tomatoes 2 cups kale, ribs removed,    and coarsely chopped Two cubes of chicken        bouillon, or more to taste 1 can (15.5 ounces)    cannellini beans, with    liquid Grated Parmesan cheese,    for serving 1. Heat the olive oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat.
FOOD
December 3, 1986 | By DEBORAH LICKLIDER, Daily News Food Editor
A reader who spent his honeymoon in Charleston, S.C., asked for a recipe for She-Crab Soup, one of that city's specialties. Here it is. SHE-CRAB SOUP 1 small onion, minced 4 tablespoons butter 1 pound crab meat (about 12 crabs) 1 quart milk 2 cups light cream 1/4 teaspoon each mace and white pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste 1/4 cup dry sherry 2 egg yolks 1/4 cup orange crab roe Rind of 1 lemon, grated Saute onion gently in the butter, add crab meat, and set aside.
FOOD
April 15, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Some long-ago book told me to pronounce pho, the Vietnamese word for a sustaining beef-and-rice noodle soup, as far. Because so many of the Vietnamese that I meet in restaurants don't contradict me when I order the far soup, I'm guessing that the book was right. I share that information because you might want to try out the pronunciation at Pho 75, a relatively new Vietnamese restaurant in the Italian Market area. Should you not, however, be aware that Pho 75 is conveniently subtitled Saigon Palace.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
"What a perfect soup day," a young woman told her friend as they shook rain from their umbrellas and placed them in a corner by the vestibule of Van's Garden on North 11th Street. A perfect day indeed, especially when you have so many wonderful soups to choose from at this small Vietnamese restaurant. Van's Garden has been around for about three years. It's a basic-looking place that offers little in the way of interesting decor. It looks much the way the old Chinatown eateries used to look - a deep rectangle filled with tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
A curious gust of chestnut soups has settled in this season, without apparent rhyme or, well, who needs a reason, overstaying the normal autumn run. No shared motive emerges. And sometimes stuff just happens - like the sudden uptick in local, house-made hot dogs and the remakes of, yes, scrapple (with crab, with just vegetables, and with foie gras, or partly foie gras.) At Meme, the corner spot at 22d and Spruce Streets, chef David Katz made a batch of his abidingly simple puree (just chestnuts, onion, chicken stock, and a dab of crème fraîche)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 15, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On sunny weekend afternoons, in the shadow of an ornate, golden Buddhist temple, Mifflin Square in South Philadelphia is dotted with charcoal grills, chile-lacquered chicken wings, and thin-sliced fatty beef heavily seasoned with lemongrass sputtering over the coals. Women pound chilies, garlic, and dried shrimp to a paste to season the snappy unripe papaya for the lime-drenched salads they sell to passersby. This is what some people call Cambodia Town, where these authentic street foods sell for $1, and where there's an effort afoot to make the title official.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As our second cooking class got underway at Roberto Clemente Middle School, I was amazed at how quickly these eighth graders had gotten the hang of things. They filed in, stashed their backpacks, donned their aprons, washed hands, and turned to the recipe. "We're making the winter minestrone today," announced Tatiana Castillo, 13, completely in charge. A new student joined us, our only boy, Raul Camacho, 14, who sports a thick shock of dyed-blue hair and hip black glasses. I wasn't sure what to expect, but he was quiet and serious, and actually a calming addition to our group.
FOOD
March 13, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a decade ago, when I was living in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, I found the imported foods in the sterile, Western-style supermarket to be prohibitively expensive, while meals from fragrant, enticing (and questionably hygienic) street carts, market stalls, and roadside restaurants were ridiculously cheap. This meant that, for a fraction of the price of a box of cereal and a carton of ultra-pasteurized, shelf-stable milk, there were bowls of spicy, steaming-hot soup, or stir-fried noodles scrambled with vegetable and eggs, or a savory, egg-y crepe stuffed with fried vegetables and fresh herbs.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. plans to cut at least $200 million in expenses over the next three years, with a little less than a third of the savings expected to come from an unspecified number of job cuts, the Camden food company said Wednesday at an investors conference in Florida. The savings will amount to 2 percent to 3 percent of the company's annual revenue and provide money for expansion in product areas that are growing faster than its legacy soups, sauces, and beverages that are sold in the center aisles of supermarkets, the company said.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Much has changed around Fitler Square over the last quarter century, from the blossoming of Schuylkill River Park to a high-end housing boom and the arrival of trendy new dining options and $4 pour-over coffee. But one thing that has remained a constant: Café Lutécia, the cozy 25-seat cafe at 23d and Lombard that serves French home cooking for breakfast and lunch - warm quiche, fresh salads, soulful soups, and baguettes stuffed with pâté - not to mention the neighborhood's best gossip.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. has shuffled top executives and said it would "proceed on a reorganization of Campbell's corporate functions to deliver agile and effective support to the business divisions, and on a major project to reexamine and redesign the company's cost structure. " In its announcement Thursday, the Camden company, whose gross profit margin has steadily eroded in recent years, provided no specifics on targets for cutting costs. The reorganization, not the first in Campbell's recent history, reduced the company's divisions to three from four.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George M. Dorrance III, 63, of Villanova, a Royal Bank of Canada wealth manager, died Tuesday, Jan. 27, of leukemia at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed with the disease last March. A scion of the Campbell Soup Co. family, Mr. Dorrance was the son of G. Morris Dorrance Jr., former CoreStates chairman, who was eulogized at his death in 2011 as "a banker with a heart. " His grandfather was a prominent surgeon. Mr. Dorrance worked from an office at 6 Tower Bridge in Conshohocken as a wealth manager for RBC Dain Rauscher Corp., which provides banking services to corporate and governmental clients and investment advice and services to individual investors, according to a company profile.
FOOD
January 16, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Over the last few months, I've been souping it up in Pho-ladelphia. Home to the third largest Vietnamese population on the East Coast, this city has long been a destination for many great renditions of the deeply warming and aromatic noodle soup. Few meals in the world deliver more satisfaction for $10 or less. And since the winter chill settled in, slurping through a steamy pool of exotic broth, rice noodles, Thai basil, and sundry cuts of meat has been the equivalent of hitting the "defrost" button.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Dr. Peter Bidey, For Philly.com/Health
Cold and flu season is upon us. Now is the time when we start to reach into the medicine cabinet and wonder, what can my children take when they get a cold? The problem is, there is no easy answer. But there are a few basic rules to treat by. First, the Food and Drug Administration does not recommend over-the-counter cold and cough medicines for children younger than 2. The reason is these medications can have serious side effects on children. Second, viruses cause common colds.
FOOD
November 27, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'So why aren't we making real grilled cheese?" said chef Marc Vetri, who was visiting our after-school cooking class. "Well, we're going for something healthier," I said. Baked whole-wheat pitas stuffed with cheese and homemade tomato soup - a reinvention of the classic pairing. "You think these are healthy?" he said, grabbing the pitas and reading off the offensive ingredients: preservatives, enzymes, gluten. "So, what kind of bread should I buy in a grocery store?
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