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Soup Kitchen

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NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Holmesburg church plans tomorrow to open the only regularly operating soup kitchen in the Northeast north of Frankford, a church spokeswoman said. Holmesburg United Methodist Church will operate the food program Monday through Friday from 4 to 6 p.m., said Harriet Lazarus, director of the program. Because of the number of people who have come to the church seeking food, "we know there are people in the area that are hungry," she said. "Just because our area is a comfortable living area doesn't mean we don't have people in need.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
First, thieves stole copper tubing and plumber's tools. Then they broke into freezers and carried off the donated steaks, roasts and hot dogs, and the TV that sat on top. Finally they stole pipes under the kitchen sink, shutting off the water supply. That's when the Church of the Advocate, an Episcopalian landmark of social justice and community outreach at 18th and Diamond streets in North Philadelphia, reluctantly closed its soup kitchen last Friday. So 200 to 350 hungry men, women and children must look elsewhere, or nowhere, for their main meal until plumbing repairs are completed.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
They ladled Virginia Carter's "goulash" onto the white Styrofoam plates and put them on trays that also contained a peach half, two slices of white bread and a cup of coffee or tea. Hungry people, some in coats fastened with safety pins, carried this fare to long tables and sat down beneath signs that read, "No profanity" and "Hats off. " Some bowed their heads briefly in prayer. Then they ate in silence. There were no seconds. This was lunch in the Salvation Army's "soup kitchen" at 31 N. Vodges St. in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Maria Romero went into the basement of St. John's Episcopal Church in Norristown, immediately greeting the volunteers preparing soup and sandwiches in the stainless-steel and tile kitchen. "Como esta?" she said, patting the blond hair of fourth grader Christopher Cunningham of Spring House. He smiled shyly as he returned her greeting. "Como esta," Romero repeated to the five other young faces standing by the kitchen counter. Like Christopher, they smiled and returned her greeting, some even in Spanish.
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
The Trenton Soup Kitchen today will ladle what may be its last hot bowls of soup for some time. The kitchen, which has been providing a warm lunch for Trenton's homeless and hungry for four years, will move tomorrow from the First United Methodist Church of New Jersey on South Broad Street to St. Michael's Episcopal Church on North Warren Street. The move means that only bag lunches will be available to the 150 to 400 people who eat at the kitchen each month, said Beverly Mills, the kitchen's director.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | by Amy Brown, From the New York Times
Well after the Los Angeles riots and despite passage of an urban-aid bill that was hailed by Congress and the White House, our nation still is not addressing the crisis of hunger. Or maybe it is, and I just missed it. I'm too busy to pay close attention to the news. I run a soup kitchen. There are now more than 700 food programs (soup kitchens, which serve hot meals, and food pantries, which supply carryout food packages) in New York City, compared with just a handful 10 years ago. They serve 2.5 million meals each month.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Jaffer Ahmad, Special to The Inquirer
Concerned with escalating needs for social services, a group of Oxford-area ministers has begun planning for a soup kitchen in the borough. The soup kitchen, with its hot meals, would add to the community's growing list of public services. "We're looking at a target date of mid- or late February," said the Rev. Lee Michaels, president of the Oxford Ministerium, an ecumenical ministers' group. Questions remain as to where the soup kitchen would be and who would run it, said Mr. Michaels, pastor at Oxford United Methodist Church.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | By Acel Moore
Thanks to hundreds of generous people, the Church of The Advocate has reopened its soup kitchen. Five days a week for 16 years, the kitchen, located in the parish house of the historic church in North Central Philadelphia, had been feeding homeless and other needy people, including children. About 150 people are fed each day. But early last month, thieves forced the church to close the kitchen when they carted away five freezers full of meat and ripped away copper pipes, leaving the century-old building without enough food or running water.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The good feeling that comes with helping others who really need it is what has kept Joanne DeCamp coming back twice a week for the last five years to serve lunch to the homeless and needy at the First Presbyterian Church in Mount Holly. And it's the same feeling that brought a troop of a dozen Girl Scouts from Chatsworth to help out at the church's Community Luncheon during the Christmas break from school. "I think the best part about what this luncheon does twice a week is give a lot of people an outlet for a variety of different kinds of socialization," said the Rev. Phil Olson, the minister of mission for the Garden Street church.
NEWS
February 28, 2009 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rose Turner, 78, senior warden of the historic Episcopal Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia, who made hope and good works the foundation of her ministry, died Monday of an apparent heart attack at her home in West Philadelphia. Since 1981, more than a million meals have been served from the church's Soup Kitchen at 18th and Diamond Streets. For many of the city's poor, it is their only hot meal of the day. When thieves ransacked the kitchen and stole appliances and food, Mrs. Turner found food to keep the operation running, hustled for money, and rolled up her sleeves to renovate and enlarge the facility.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Great music isn't a stranger to the Church of the Advocate on Diamond Street in the urban frontier of North Philadelphia. Just inside the French Gothic sanctuary, a large greenish angel points its trumpet heavenward. And only a few feet beyond that, on certain nights, stands the Prometheus Chamber Orchestra, in one of its regular season of free concerts - the second season concludes on Saturday - with hardly any budget and, what's more significant, no conductor. "It saves on overhead," says bassist Jerrell Jackson with subtle, smart-aleck irony.
FOOD
March 13, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a decade ago, when I was living in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, I found the imported foods in the sterile, Western-style supermarket to be prohibitively expensive, while meals from fragrant, enticing (and questionably hygienic) street carts, market stalls, and roadside restaurants were ridiculously cheap. This meant that, for a fraction of the price of a box of cereal and a carton of ultra-pasteurized, shelf-stable milk, there were bowls of spicy, steaming-hot soup, or stir-fried noodles scrambled with vegetable and eggs, or a savory, egg-y crepe stuffed with fried vegetables and fresh herbs.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The table was set, the delicacies beckoned. Smoothies whipped up with overripe strawberries. A cobbler confected from aged pineapple, bruised kiwis, and stale birthday cake. EPA administrator Gina McCarthy couldn't wait to dig in. "It's not often," she said, "that I get to taste the fruits of our labor. " McCarthy was in Philadelphia on Friday to laud a partnership aimed at solving two problems at once: food waste and hunger. Since last spring, Drexel University Food Lab students have been creating recipes that incorporate foods commonly donated to soup kitchens, where, despite best intentions, they may get thrown out anyway because they are unappetizing.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Serving daily meals through a late-autumn blast of ice and snow. Managing storerooms and shelves overflowing with donated food. Ensuring Christmas cheer for hundreds of needy kids through an Adopt-a-Child Gift Program. December is always busy at Manna on Main Street, a Lansdale soup kitchen, food pantry, and emergency-aid organization that serves a slice of the Philadelphia suburbs' "hidden poor. " But executive director Suzan Neiger Gould has a pointed message she likes to offer around this time of year, when seasonal spirits and tax deadlines combine to spur extra generosity.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
D OMINICK RODRIGUEZ, 34, of Middlesex County, N.J., and Lori DeFinis, 23, of Bensalem, are co-owners with two other people of SouperVan, a food-truck business at Rutgers University in New Brunswick that recently expanded to Philly. Rodriguez and DeFinis run the Philadelphia operation, which is partnering with the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission in North Philadelphia. I spoke with Rodriguez. Q: When did SouperVan launch? A: In 2010, on the Rutgers campus. We've been there ever since.
SPORTS
June 7, 2012
Radnor pitcher Christy Von Pusch, a senior bound for Penn State, has been named Gatorade's Pennsylvania softball player of the year. The award honors athletic and academic excellence and character on and off the field. By winning the state honor, Von Pusch becomes a finalist for Gatorade national player of the year. The 5-foot-9 righthander went 14-2 this season, compiling a 0.81 ERA with 205 strikeouts in 1031/3 innings, and led the Red Raiders (19-2) to their first Central League title since 1984.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By JENICE M. ARMSTRONG, armstrj@phillynews.com 215-854-2223
DON'T GET between city residents and their parking spaces. Just ask the members of Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church, who found themselves bounced from street to street in search of parking and wound up feeling unwelcomed even though they've been worshipping in their South Philly neighborhood for years. The church sits in the 2300 block of Fitzwater, a crowded street of rowhouses and limited parking, made worse by recent development. For years, the mostly African-American church congregation had been parking across the street on the north side of Grays Ferry Avenue, adjacent to what's now Toll's Naval Square, a luxury gated community of townhomes and condominiums.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
By George Parry Dear member of Congress: Here at Constituent Outreach Solutions, we are appalled at the senseless destruction of Rep. Anthony Weiner's brilliant career. This forward-looking legislator is being hounded from office just for exploring the cutting edge in constituent services: using the Internet to help voters get in touch with their repressed but altogether natural desire to mate with their elected officials. Let's face facts: The voters want you. They want you to solve their little problems; they want you to impose order on their messy lives; and, even if the majority don't realize it, they simply want you. And why wouldn't they?
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Jean Webster considered the people she was feeding her "guests," not simply the homeless or hungry who roam the streets of Atlantic City. So she always served a big helping of "self-worth and dignity" with the fried chicken and scalloped potatoes she dished out five days a week at Sister Jean's Kitchen. Her homeless outreach started more than 25 years ago when she saw a man rummaging through a garbage can and invited him home for dinner. Her mission - she refused to call the place a "soup kitchen" - would grow to feed 400 people a day. Mrs. Webster, 76, a nationally known homeless advocate known locally as "Sister Jean," "St. Jean," and the "Mother Teresa of Jersey," died Monday, Jan. 10, at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City, where she had been hospitalized since Dec. 22 for a cardiopulmonary condition.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In her 18 years, Deanna Ormerod touched many lives with her sweet smile - from the homeless in Camden to her Lenape High School German club and cheerleading squad. More than 200 students from her various circles - athletes, musicians, and club members - attended a vigil in her memory Tuesday at the Medford school. Miss Ormerod, a senior from Mount Laurel, died Monday afternoon when the vehicle she was driving north on Hartford Road in Medford collided with a car going south.
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