CollectionsSour Soup
IN THE NEWS

Sour Soup

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
There is nothing in Chinatown quite like Ray's Cafe. The specialty is coffee - more than 25 different varieties, from such far- flung spots as Jamaica, Hawaii, Yemen, Sumatra, Tanzania, Brazil and Colombia. The rarest, Jamaica Blue Mountain, is $5 a cup; a big cup of medium- bodied Colombian Armenian Supremo or smooth Brazil Bourbon Santos is $2.75. The coffee, made with spring water, comes with a little cookie filled with intensely plummy jam, like a Chinese Fig Newton. Ray's doesn't look like an ordinary java joint, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
East very nicely meets West at 18th and Chestnut Streets, the location of Mandarin Garden. This Chinese restaurant looks half like oldtime Chinatown and half like a 1950s Center City luncheonette. Enter, and discover that looks can be deceiving. The food is strictly up- to-date. Prices, however, tend to linger in the not-too-distant past. But who among us will argue about a place where you can dine well, and quite reasonably? The Mandarin Garden is open seven days a week, and spends that time preparing food in the basic styles of Mandarin, Hunan and Szechuan.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Around the corner from the bustling Italian Market, a half-dozen Vietnamese restaurants are quietly serving meals considered exotic by their mostly white, middle-aged clientele. One of these restaurants is Vinh Hoa, on the corner of 7th and Christian streets. There, Hue Tran and his wife, Anh Ly, prepare nearly a hundred meals they learned from friends, from cookbooks and from other restaurants. The Vietnam refugees certainly didn't know anything about cooking when they bought the restaurant eight years ago. Back then, says Tran, 49, who acts as host, "We didn't know what a wok was. " "When I went to buy meat, I didn't know what was good or what was bad," adds Ly, 48, the cook.
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
CinCin (pronounced "sin-sin") means "brilliant spring" in Mandarin, and if ever a restaurant's name fit the food, this is it. The approach of owner/executive chef Michael Wei and chef James Huang is to marry Chinese ingredients with French-inspired sauces. Nothing new about that, of course, and the menu gave us a strong case of deja vu for the wonderful Alouette restaurant of the early 1980s. It may remind others of Bryn Mawr's Yangming and Willow Grove's Mandarin Garden, two other Wei restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Agroup of elderly women truly were in Noodle Heaven the other evening. Literally and figuratively. The four were dining at the Center City Chinese restaurant near the Academy of Music, and they were ecstatic over the various noodle dishes that each was persuading the other to taste. They apparently were headed for a show, because when one pointed to her watch, the other three returned immediately to earth, forgot about their sharing and began dining in earnest. In the background, there was soft and mellow Asian music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Empress Garden is Chinatown's version of the South Philadelphia Italian restaurant that the locals went to for straightforward but worthy food when Mom wanted a night out of the kitchen. This small - six booths and a couple of tables - place manages to do the little things in a big way: Crisp vegetables, food that's served hot, and ingredients that are consistently fresh. While the restaurant is tiny and has only one window, it still manages to convey a feeling of being bright and airy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
When a restaurant closes for eight months, two things are generally true. The first is that it's toast, a goner, fini . The second is that it reopens, but, oops, too late: Its crowd has moved on; there are plenty of other fish in the sea. This is what makes Hunan, the Main Line fixture since 1973, particularly triumphant. Not only has it opened again after its eight-month hiatus (caused by a Peking duck that overheated the oven, drawing the attention of fire officials to the need for a host of fire-code updates)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Shing Kee, a new restaurant on the southern fringe of Chinatown, might not win any awards for its decor or surroundings, but what it lacks in atmosphere, it more than makes up for in its food. The restaurant is housed in a modest and unadorned rectangular room. Outside, huge mounds of construction earth line the curbside. Comfortable booths occupy one side, while family-style circular tables are arranged along a mirrored wall on the other. What brightens up this otherwise drab dining room are the colorful plates of well-prepared food.
FOOD
January 24, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from Jan. 22: Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends. I've been traveling, playing roadie for my wife Elizabeth's book tour - and, most important, ensuring a plate of fried okra and barbecue to keep our energy up. More on that later; first, today's Crumb Tracker Quiz. Guess, in order, the three places where I ate these dishes: (1) roast duck stir-fried udon noodles; (2) good fresh gnocchi (hint: Center City); (3)
FOOD
November 22, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
A restaurant for diners with varying tastes in Chinese food seems a fair way of describing the Silver Palace in the new Quality Inn on Race Street in Philadelphia's Chinatown. For example, if you're a devotee of the Cantonese style, you'll find items on the menu that suit your taste buds. The more adventurous diner has the opportunity to take a quantum leap into the wonderful world of dim sum. For the rest of us, the Silver Palace incorporates some Szechuan and Hunan dishes, and also has a page of dishes written in Chinese.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 24, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from Jan. 22: Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends. I've been traveling, playing roadie for my wife Elizabeth's book tour - and, most important, ensuring a plate of fried okra and barbecue to keep our energy up. More on that later; first, today's Crumb Tracker Quiz. Guess, in order, the three places where I ate these dishes: (1) roast duck stir-fried udon noodles; (2) good fresh gnocchi (hint: Center City); (3)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
When a restaurant closes for eight months, two things are generally true. The first is that it's toast, a goner, fini . The second is that it reopens, but, oops, too late: Its crowd has moved on; there are plenty of other fish in the sea. This is what makes Hunan, the Main Line fixture since 1973, particularly triumphant. Not only has it opened again after its eight-month hiatus (caused by a Peking duck that overheated the oven, drawing the attention of fire officials to the need for a host of fire-code updates)
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
CinCin (pronounced "sin-sin") means "brilliant spring" in Mandarin, and if ever a restaurant's name fit the food, this is it. The approach of owner/executive chef Michael Wei and chef James Huang is to marry Chinese ingredients with French-inspired sauces. Nothing new about that, of course, and the menu gave us a strong case of deja vu for the wonderful Alouette restaurant of the early 1980s. It may remind others of Bryn Mawr's Yangming and Willow Grove's Mandarin Garden, two other Wei restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Agroup of elderly women truly were in Noodle Heaven the other evening. Literally and figuratively. The four were dining at the Center City Chinese restaurant near the Academy of Music, and they were ecstatic over the various noodle dishes that each was persuading the other to taste. They apparently were headed for a show, because when one pointed to her watch, the other three returned immediately to earth, forgot about their sharing and began dining in earnest. In the background, there was soft and mellow Asian music.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
No meat, no poultry, no seafood. No eggs or dairy products. No MSG. No smoking. What, then, does Singapore Vegetarian Chinese Restaurant in Chinatown say yes to? Dishes based on fresh and dried vegetables, along with mock meat and seafood dishes made from grains, glutens and soy products. Portions and prices are almost too good to be true: A generous three-course lunch can be had for $5.95; on the regular menu, almost every entree is $7 or less. The blue-and-white dining room is prettier than many in Chinatown, with its faux greenery, pastel tablecloths and fan-folded cloth napkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Empress Garden is Chinatown's version of the South Philadelphia Italian restaurant that the locals went to for straightforward but worthy food when Mom wanted a night out of the kitchen. This small - six booths and a couple of tables - place manages to do the little things in a big way: Crisp vegetables, food that's served hot, and ingredients that are consistently fresh. While the restaurant is tiny and has only one window, it still manages to convey a feeling of being bright and airy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Shing Kee, a new restaurant on the southern fringe of Chinatown, might not win any awards for its decor or surroundings, but what it lacks in atmosphere, it more than makes up for in its food. The restaurant is housed in a modest and unadorned rectangular room. Outside, huge mounds of construction earth line the curbside. Comfortable booths occupy one side, while family-style circular tables are arranged along a mirrored wall on the other. What brightens up this otherwise drab dining room are the colorful plates of well-prepared food.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
There is nothing in Chinatown quite like Ray's Cafe. The specialty is coffee - more than 25 different varieties, from such far- flung spots as Jamaica, Hawaii, Yemen, Sumatra, Tanzania, Brazil and Colombia. The rarest, Jamaica Blue Mountain, is $5 a cup; a big cup of medium- bodied Colombian Armenian Supremo or smooth Brazil Bourbon Santos is $2.75. The coffee, made with spring water, comes with a little cookie filled with intensely plummy jam, like a Chinese Fig Newton. Ray's doesn't look like an ordinary java joint, either.
FOOD
March 19, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
"That's too much food. " It was spoken so softly that we weren't sure we had heard correctly. Our dinner at Vinh Hoa Vietnamese Restaurant in South Philadelphia was to be a review meal - my second - and while we couldn't explain that to the waiter who worried that we were being wasteful, we needed to sample fairly extensively from the Vietnamese-Chinese menu. But we didn't plan to eat every bite of everything ordered, and we assured him that we were aware that there probably would be a surplus.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
In the year or so since it has opened, Tang's Peking Duck House - on the corner of 10th and Arch Streets - has changed the appearance of its dining room from budget-basic to Chinatown-comfortable. Yes, yes, the dishes are plastic (and have that annoying dull, tapping sound when your fork strikes them), but they're colorful and cheery. And the food that amply fills them is certainly good and reasonable. Along with the forks that rest on the wine-colored placemats, there are always chopsticks.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|