CollectionsSouthern States
IN THE NEWS

Southern States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
To look outside, it's hard to believe that spring is just a couple of weeks away. Oh, all right, a couple of months. But there's a fun, and not dangerously expensive, way to speed its arrival. Just take a few days off, pack up the car and drive south until the grass looks green and the breezes feel sweet. Unless you have a lot of time and more than $100 for gas, it might be best to delay your departure a month or so, which should be just about enough time to send away for brand-new state travel guides from two of our nearer Southern neighbors.
NEWS
March 11, 1986 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months now, Southern politicians have been plotting to give their region the pre-eminent role in determining the identity of the major parties' next presidential nominees. They have been assembling, state by state, what amounts to a regional presidential primary to be held on March 8, 1988, soon after the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary. This plan is the brainchild of Southern Democratic leaders, most of whom were not exactly thrilled with the nomination in 1984 of Walter F. Mondale, whom they considered a big-spending liberal.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though U.S. athletes will be wearing chic China-made Ralph Lauren duds during the Olympics' opening ceremony Friday, a 225-employee company in North Philadelphia is taking special pride that one team - the rowers - will be wearing made-in-the-U.S.A. racing unisuits and practice gear in London. The story of that company, Boathouse Sports Inc., is one of a small American apparel manufacturer in a rusted-out industrial city beating the odds in an era of global trade flows and multibillion-dollar, big-brand conglomerates.
NEWS
December 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's civil-rights office stepped up its fight with Southern states over voting rights, saying Friday that it would block a new South Carolina law that requires voters to show a government-issued photo ID before casting a ballot. The Justice Department invoked the Voting Rights Act, saying the new photo ID rule could deny the right to vote for tens of thousands of blacks and other minorities. "According to the state's statistics, there are 81,938 minority citizens who are already registered to vote and who lack DMV-issued identification," Thomas E. Perez, chief of Justice's Civil Rights Division, said in a letter to South Carolina officials.
NEWS
September 4, 2009
MICHAEL VICK served over a year and a half in prison for fighting and killing dogs. America's forefathers didn't serve one day for killing Native Americans, nor did any of the racist hate-mongers in the Southern states for 400-plus years of slavery. Vick has fulfilled what the commonwealth of Virginia has deemed a reasonable punishment, so everyone else should just back off. I would bet that if your son was arrested and jailed for rape and murder and released from prison, you would want him to get a second chance.
NEWS
May 11, 1987
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall has sounded a critical note during the celebration of the Constitution bicentennial with his reminder that the original document perpetuated slavery and denied women the vote. His remarks are at odds with the unalloyed praise heaped on the framers' wisdom by others. The true "miracle at Philadelphia", says Justice Marshall, was "not the birth of the Constitution but its life . . . through two turbulent centuries" that saw the passage of the Bill of Rights and later amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and enfranchising women.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
In the rustic setting of Historic Sugartown Inc., the building complex being renovated at the junction of Sugartown, Boot and Spring Roads, more than 150 guests gathered to sip from the wassail bowl and sing Christmas carols. Leading the carols on Monday night - with gift ribbons wrapped around her head instead of a trademark hat - was Pat Reeser, Berwyn, chairwoman of the annual open-house event. "This is my favorite party. It's always so much fun," said Reeser. On the committee with Reeser were Lynd Meyer, attending with her husband, Arno, and Carolyn Thomas, all of Malvern, and Penny Wilson, West Chester.
NEWS
October 10, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
U.S. Civil Rights Commission leaders have concluded "there is no evidence of a national conspiracy" in the arson attacks on Southern black churches. "Nor do we find signs of a regional conspiracy," Commission Chairwoman Mary Frances Berry announced yesterday. But she said the lack of a general conspiracy "makes these fires even more frightening. " The commission conducted fact-finding hearings in several Southern states to determine what fueled firebombings and arson attacks on at least 59 African- American churches from October 1995 through June.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The number of homeowners behind in their mortgage payments fell late last year, but more slipped into foreclosure than at any time since 1987. The Mortgage Bankers Association said yesterday the proportion of homeowners at least 30 days late on payments fell to a seasonally adjusted 4.78 percent, the lowest in a year. That was down from 5.07 percent at the end of the third quarter and a five- year high of 5.28 percent in June. The fourth quarter rate was still slightly higher than the rate a year earlier, 4.71 percent.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
Terry Bivens is to be congratulated on his well-written and thoughtful article "Can prisons for profit work?" (Inquirer Magazine, Aug. 3). The debate between those in favor and those opposed to "prisons for profit" that is outlined in the article again demonstrates that Americans should learn their history and learn from their history. How can we discuss this issue in a historical vacuum? Doesn't any penologist on either side remember the notorious convict-lease system that plagued much of the South in the last quarter of the 19th century?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer, coming near you are creepy crawlers the city has never seen before. They sting multiple times and leave victims feeling lit on fire - usually just for a while. Two children in Northeast Philadelphia appear to be the first local victims of these fire ants. Both were diagnosed in the last month, marking the farthest north fire ants have ever been reported in the Eastern United States, a national expert said. Though the particular species of fire ant remains unconfirmed, the insect could threaten local agriculture, and, in rare cases, cause death.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
TWO WHITE MEN talked about race recently and, not surprisingly, got into trouble. One was a Supreme Court justice, which goes to show that even the mighty must be careful when treading the racial divide. No matter how good your intentions might be (or perhaps, how bad), you risk being misunderstood by people who make a very good living out of misunderstanding. Antonin Scalia was the first one to dip his toe into the roiling waters by observing that the Voting Rights Act might have run its course.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
By A'Lelia Bundles On April 25, 1864 - 15 months after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863 - Annie Davis sent this letter to the White House: Mr. President It is my Desire to be free. To go to see my people on the eastern shore. My mistress wont let me. You will please let me know if we are free. And what I can do. I write to you for advice. Please send me word this week. Or as soon as possible, and oblidge.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Jay Lindsay, Associated Press
BOSTON - A new study on the generosity of Americans suggests that states with the least religious residents are also the stingiest about giving money to charity. The study, released Monday by the Chronicle of Philanthropy, found that residents in states where religious participation is higher than the rest of the nation, particularly in the South, gave the greatest percentage of their discretionary income to charity. The Northeast, with lower religious participation, was the least generous to charities, with the six New England states filling the last six slots among the 50 states.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though U.S. athletes will be wearing chic China-made Ralph Lauren duds during the Olympics' opening ceremony Friday, a 225-employee company in North Philadelphia is taking special pride that one team - the rowers - will be wearing made-in-the-U.S.A. racing unisuits and practice gear in London. The story of that company, Boathouse Sports Inc., is one of a small American apparel manufacturer in a rusted-out industrial city beating the odds in an era of global trade flows and multibillion-dollar, big-brand conglomerates.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Failing grade on Civil War David Goldfield deserves a failing grade ("A deadly rush into Civil War," Monday). Southern slave owners took their states out of the Union because they wanted no restrictions on the expansion of slavery. They feared any political evolution that would make a peaceful end to slavery possible. In 1860, Lincoln and the Republican platform recognized the constitutionality of slavery in the states where it already existed, but opposed the creation of any new slave states.
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It's Independence Day, so many Americans are reflecting on the year 1776, when this nation was born. But today's rancorous political divisions are also a reminder of 1861, when President Lincoln explained in a Fourth of July speech why war was necessary to crush that period's "states' rights" movement. More than 150 years later, another crew of states'-righters are challenging a president. They're not threatening to secede, but are vowing to ignore a law passed by Congress and recently deemed constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court — the Affordable Care Act, which they have derisively dubbed Obamacare.
NEWS
December 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's civil-rights office stepped up its fight with Southern states over voting rights, saying Friday that it would block a new South Carolina law that requires voters to show a government-issued photo ID before casting a ballot. The Justice Department invoked the Voting Rights Act, saying the new photo ID rule could deny the right to vote for tens of thousands of blacks and other minorities. "According to the state's statistics, there are 81,938 minority citizens who are already registered to vote and who lack DMV-issued identification," Thomas E. Perez, chief of Justice's Civil Rights Division, said in a letter to South Carolina officials.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | Associated Press
U.S. students don't know much about American history, according to results of a national test released yesterday. Just 13 percent of high-school seniors who took the 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress, called the Nation's Report Card, showed solid academic performance in American history. The two other grades didn't perform much better, with just 22 percent of fourth-grade students and 18 percent of eighth-graders scoring proficient or better. The test quizzed students on topics including colonization, the American Revolution and the Civil War, and the contemporary United States.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
The dramatic - and undoubtedly smelly - fish kill on Delaware Bay this month wasn't an effect of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, as some readers posited. Or a sign of cataclysmic climate change. The deaths of thousands of menhaden that washed onto the bayshore of Cape May County were most likely the unfortunate result of steady winds, ocean movements, and even the science of flat soda pop. When the fish kill happened on Aug. 11, conditions were unusual but not unexpected, said University of Delaware oceanographer Matt Oliver, who's part of a group that monitors ocean conditions.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|