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SPORTS
February 21, 1992 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER OLYMPICS BUREAU
The United States will play the team from the former Soviet Union in a little hockey game today. So let's get some old baggage out of the way first. Twelve years ago, a bunch of American upstarts beat the Soviets at the Lake Placid Olympics. That was a semifinal game, just like this one. And to this day, yes, some people still remember where they were, what they were doing, etc., etc., when the Miracle happened. That is a small, tired corner of this drama. What is more interesting is that today's game could be the last - or next to last - for one of the world's great sports dynasties, the glorious remnants of a Soviet national team that won the gold medal seven times in the last nine Olympics.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ivan and Maria yesterday stood transfixed in the middle of the makeshift shop, listening silently to the broadcast from Radio Free Europe of events unfolding at home in the Soviet Union. "I told you. The people will never support this committee that's taken power," said Maria after she heard news of the massive street demonstrations in Moscow against the group that ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Monday. Ivan and Maria, who asked that their last names not be published, are among the hundreds of thousands of Soviet soldiers and civilians still stationed in eastern Germany, doing their best to make sense of the confusing news reports.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | By Murray Dubin and Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writers
A deepening sense of outrage and betrayal has spread through the Latvian- American community in reaction to Sunday's attack upon the separatist Latvian Interior Ministry by Soviet special forces. Across the region, Latvian-Americans are gathering to express anger at the use of lethal force - five Latvians died in the assault - and at the threat to their homeland's brief experiment with democracy. The dismay is not directed only at the Soviets. "President Bush says he's working for the new world order, but my question is, what place is there for the small nations like Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania?"
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By Jan Sherbin
American troops are among the 10,000 people in Sunday's Victory Day parade in Moscow, a month after the signing of the historic Russian-American arms-reduction treaty. "We Won Together" is the Russian slogan on this 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. Although the Soviets and Americans were ideological enemies before, during, and after World War II, we were allies in fighting the Nazis. The two nations may have won a common victory, but our war experiences were vastly different.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Soviet Union yesterday expelled an assistant U.S. military attache on charges of spying, and a spokesman made the unusual admission that it was done in retaliation for a similar move by the United States last week. Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennadi I. Gerasimov said at a news conference that U.S. Army Lt. Col. Daniel Francis Van Gundy 3d was being expelled "for activities incompatible with his diplomatic status" - diplomatic parlance for spying. Gerasimov accused Van Gundy of deviating from a prepared travel itinerary within the U.S.S.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Russian army cap lies in a vacant lot behind the apartment house where the officers used to live, weeds curling over the hammer-and-sickle insignia. It is one of the few things the Russians are leaving behind in Berlin, other than the stray cats foraging for food. Anything that could possibly be sold back in Russia - sinks, toilets, doorknobs, hinges and window panes - is already packed. After 49 years, the Russians are finally going home. Today, following a military parade presided over by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the last of the 338,000 soldiers who were stationed in the former East Germany will depart German soil.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The main gate to Soviet military headquarters in Germany is well guarded. Visitors and soldiers are carefully checked as they pass in and out of the huge base. But just 100 yards away from the gate, a 20-foot section of the fence has been knocked over, allowing anyone to enter or leave the base as he pleases. From the path worn through the grass, it appears that the fence has been down for weeks, if not months. It seems an apt metaphor for the state of the Soviet military here.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an observation tower high above the training fields southwest of Berlin, a former East German officer is barking commands to former West German tanks as they sweep flawlessly through intricate maneuvers. Here in the dust of Brueck, Capt. Axel Winkler is rediscovering his Prussian military roots, helping fashion a unified German army that is one lean but very mean fighting machine. Winkler is one of 9,500 East German officers battling for a place in the new Bundeswehr, or federal army.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar has kidnapped and killed Afghan rebels fighting the Soviet army. He has been accused of collaborating with Soviet agents and ordering the murder of foreign doctors and journalists. He has built a network of jails, and filled them with Afghans who oppose him. He has hijacked shipments of weapons destined for battle against Soviet troops. And he hates the United States almost as much as he hates the Soviet Union. U.S. officials who know Hekmatyar call him "scary . . . vicious . . . a fascist . . . definite dictatorship material.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The history of the Soviet Union is only 72 years long, but 16-year-old Andrei Komlev is learning a version different from that taught his father three decades ago. At home, the discussions of what Andrei is being taught at School 1131 in Moscow's Kuntsevsky district are lively and passionate. "My father, who works for the Soviet army, has a different view of the Stalinist period," the 11th grader said in his bright but starkly functional classroom the other day. "He is negative about Stalin's repressions, but he thinks that at that time, the economic conditions were better for ordinary people.
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