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NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Edward Preston, 92, who survived the Holocaust and afterward came to America, where he thrived, died of multiple organ failure Wednesday at home. He lived in Hyde Park near Wilmington. In 1985, Mr. Preston and his son, David Lee Preston, who was an Inquirer staff writer at the time, took a monthlong trip to France, the Soviet Union, Poland and Germany to revisit his past. The younger Preston wrote an article for Inquirer Magazine that chronicled the trip. The article was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing.
NEWS
January 18, 1986
Soviet "disinformation" whispers that there will soon be a spectacular improvement in the plight of Jewry in the Soviet Union. But there's not a shred of evidence to back it up. On the contrary, the U.S.S.R.'s greatest living symbol of blocked emigration, mathematician Anatoly Shcharansky, has just been sentenced to an additional five months' punishment within the internal prison of the notorious Perm labor camp. He was thrown in the Gulag in 1977 for seeking to reunite with his beloved wife, Avital, in Jerusalem.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-five years ago Emmanual Lurie was a chemist in Moscow. Because of that, the Soviet government says now he cannot leave. He knows too much, the Soviets say, even though the exposure to classified information that they are contending took place would have been in 1964. Lurie, who is Jewish, has sought permission to emigrate to Israel for the last 10 years. That permission has been repeatedly denied. Lurie's plight was recounted July 20 by his wife, Judith, who was honored by the congregation at the Beth Tikvah Synagogue in Erdenheim.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | By Sergei Shargorodsky, Associated Press Ellen Warren of the Inquirer Washington bureau contributed to this article
The national airline Aeroflot yesterday closed one of the main routes for Jews emigrating to Israel, halting ticket sales to Budapest, and denied that it had opened another route through Egypt, Soviet media reported. The closure followed a decision by Hungary's Malev airline this week to stop flights of Soviet Jews to Tel Aviv via Budapest because of threats of attacks. Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of Palestine has said it would attack the flights and airline facilities carrying Soviet Jews to Israel.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
By Mark Robbins Growing up in New England, I associated Philadelphia with a small but potent mixture: My aunt, uncle, and two cousins; the Phillies of the late '70s; my dad's alma mater, Penn; and the movement for Soviet Jewry that culminated 25 years ago. Through their leadership in the movement to free Soviet Jews, my aunt and uncle, along with thousands of other Philadelphians, were writing another chapter in the story of the cradle of American...
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Operation Exodus - an international program to take advantage of relaxed emigration policy and bring as many Soviet Jews as possible to Israel - has begun, and the South Jersey Jewish community has mobilized to do its share. Fourteen area synagogues have joined with the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey to raise $1.8 million in the next three years, said federation director Stuart Alperin. That figure, based on the local Jewish population of 30,000, is the South Jersey obligation in the national target of raising $42 million.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The freer political atmosphere in the Soviet Union, Raphael Edelmann was saying, had inspired "simple people" to lash out at Jews. And in spite of Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts at reform, economic conditions were as bleak, grocery shelves as barren, as they had always been. Edelmann, 32, a physician, left the Baltic seaport of Riga two months ago with his wife, their infant daughter and his mother. They have been living in an "absorption center" in the Judean Hills west of Jerusalem, studying Hebrew and preparing for a new life as Israelis.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Bush administration's response to the Soviet Jewish exodus and resulting pressures for immigration was called laughable and "disgraceful" by members of Congress yesterday. The came on the same day that administration officials announced a new plan for acting on all Soviet refugee applications at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow - and then acknowledged that anyone who applied under it would have to wait at least a year because of backlogs. The applications will be sent to Washington, where the State Department will assign priorities, based on whether the applicant has relatives in the United States.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elie Wiesel, the man who survived Nazi death camps to become a leader in the crusade against hatred and violence, last night gave Moscow's Jews a memory that will outlive them. "Not a day passes that I do not think of you, or talk of you, or dream of you, or pray for you," Wiesel, this year's Nobel Peace Prize winner, told thousands of Jews gathered in a synagogue here. "You give us so much hope. " It was the most joyous Jewish holiday of the year - Simhat Torah, a celebration of the Torah, or law - and more than 10,000 Jews had jammed the central synagogue in Moscow and the street outside for the occasion and to see Wiesel.
NEWS
February 4, 1986 | By Donald Kimelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leading Jewish activists here said yesterday that the freeing of Anatoly Shcharansky in an East-West spy trade would be great cause for celebration but probably would not improve the prospects for the thousands of Jews who have been denied permission to emigrate. "It would be a great festival for all his friends and relatives and all the refuseniks," said Aleksandr Lerner, a longtime refusenik and friend of Shcharansky, "but it would not mean that we will follow him soon. " Shcharansky, 38, a mathematician, was sentenced in 1978 to 13 years in prison and labor camps after a highly publicized trial in which his efforts to document the injustice of the government's emigration policy were adjudged treasonous.
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NEWS
December 12, 2012
By Mark Robbins Growing up in New England, I associated Philadelphia with a small but potent mixture: My aunt, uncle, and two cousins; the Phillies of the late '70s; my dad's alma mater, Penn; and the movement for Soviet Jewry that culminated 25 years ago. Through their leadership in the movement to free Soviet Jews, my aunt and uncle, along with thousands of other Philadelphians, were writing another chapter in the story of the cradle of American...
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Florence Sack Gilbert, 92, of Bala Cynwyd, director of volunteers at Hahnemann Hospital from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s, died Monday, May 9, at Lankenau Hospital. Born in West Philadelphia, Mrs. Gilbert graduated from West Philadelphia High School and earned a medical technician's diploma at the former Philadelphia Normal School. A daughter, Beth Reisboard, said Mrs. Gilbert worked briefly at the former Mount Sinai Hospital in South Philadelphia. In 1949, Reisboard said, Mrs. Gilbert was among the founders of the former Yeadon Jewish Community Center, a synagogue and service organization, where she established and helped run youth social groups.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Edward Preston, 92, who survived the Holocaust and afterward came to America, where he thrived, died of multiple organ failure Wednesday at home. He lived in Hyde Park near Wilmington. In 1985, Mr. Preston and his son, David Lee Preston, who was an Inquirer staff writer at the time, took a monthlong trip to France, the Soviet Union, Poland and Germany to revisit his past. The younger Preston wrote an article for Inquirer Magazine that chronicled the trip. The article was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing.
NEWS
March 15, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Morris V. Dembowitz, 90, of Cherry Hill, former president and executive director of the Board of Rabbis of Greater Philadelphia, died Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. An Army chaplain in Europe during World War II, Rabbi Dembowitz counseled Holocaust survivors from the concentration camps, and the experience profoundly affected his rabbinate. He returned to the United States and worked for causes that promoted interfaith understanding and helped in efforts to resettle Soviet Jews who had been prevented from practicing their religion.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein won't be tooling his way up Interstate 95 through Port Richmond in the next couple of days. But the folks at Steen Outdoor Advertising have some advice for him anyway. Saddam Hussein, reads the message on seven Steen billboards around the area, Give Peace A Chance. Go Into Exile. The billboards show the Iraqi leader holding a cup of coffee. On the right is a dove. It is a message even a dictator accustomed to getting advice from a clique of yes-men could understand.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Opposing religious persecution overseas might seem easy, but a congressional-style hearing in Philadelphia yesterday showed some of the right-left, Jewish-Christian balancing that's required. U.S. Rep. Jon Fox, R-Pa., of Montgomery County, and two House GOP colleagues heard a Philadelphia Catholic bishop, a local Jewish leader and others describe the new wrinkles of persecution in Europe, the old Soviet Union and parts of Asia. It's not always a totalitarian government, they said, but ethnic nationalist leaders, local bigots, or the formerly persecuted themselves, who persecute.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | by Sharon Randall, Scripps Howard News Service
This is a story about Soviet repression, Jerry Seinfeld and Chelsea Clinton. But mostly it's about Daniel Lipkin, 17, who is living the American dream and wants to help others live it, too. "It was my parents' dream to raise their children in America," says the Monterey (Calif.) High School senior and co-valedictorian, who's been accepted at such hallowed halls as the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford, Duke and Yale. "My parents are pretty happy, both for me and my older sister.
NEWS
August 3, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge stripped a Lithuanian emigre of U.S. citizenship yesterday, concluding that he concealed his participation in a Lithuanian army battalion that helped the Nazis round up and massacre hundreds of thousands of Jews during World War II. Jonas Stelmokas, 78, of Lansdowne, a retired architect and prominent member of Philadelphia's Lithuanian community, now faces deportation. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Jan E. DuBois said Stelmokas "misrepresented or concealed his wartime activities" when he applied for immigration and later for citizenship.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Soviet Jewish filmmaker Michael Kalik has lived a life so dramatic, so buffeted by the forces of communism and anti-Semitism, it is no wonder that he felt compelled to chronicle his struggles in the memory film And the Wind Returneth . . . . When Kalik was born in 1927, the Soviet Union was still in a dynamic phase. He characterizes himself as one of those Jews who fervently believed in the communist faith, then was disillusioned by Stalinism (but no more than Stalinists were disillusioned by him)
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They were not a good mix, the Soviet regime and artists whose Jewish heritage it worked vigorously to repress. In the old Soviet Union, the artists often worked surreptitiously because of the very real possibility of government persecution. Many took jobs in related fields, as graphic artists and book illustrators. And after hours, they painted secretly in their homes, using whatever materials could be scrounged, no matter how inferior. Their only audience was a few trusted friends and relatives.
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