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NEWS
June 2, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman, Special to The Inquirer
Ivar Kronick believes that one way to help ease the tension between the United States and the Soviet Union is for people of both nations to get to know one another. And that is what the 17-year-old Haverford resident hopes to do when he visits the Soviet Union this summer on a peace mission sponsored by the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and Citizens Exchange Council in New York. Kronick, a junior at the Shipley School, will be part of a group of about 20 people who will visit Moscow, Leningrad, Sinferopol and Yalta for three weeks beginning July 19. The group hopes to meet with private citizens as well as with government representatives.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can this sea of plenty that Elena Assad is wading through - piles of fruits and vegetables, stacks of freshly butchered meat, rows of plump, pink piglets neatly arrayed on marble slabs - really be in the Soviet Union, land of empty shelves? Assad, a Soviet woman whose husband is Lebanese, moves elegantly down the aisles of the Central Market, her full-length brown leather coat and high leather boots attracting the attention of olive-skinned vendors from the Caucasus. They spit sunflower seeds and watch as she buys vegetables, fruit, walnuts, honey and fine cuts of beef.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Democracy . . . is a charming form of government, full of variety and disorder. " - Plato About an hour into the tumultuous free-for-all that was trying to become a nominating meeting for elections to a new Soviet legislature, as citizens were shouting out suggestions or slow-hand-clapping unpopular speakers into silence, beleaguered chairman Sergei Khudyakov stood shaking his head. "Comrades," he told the crowd, "this is a strange scene. " "No, comrade," someone yelled from the back of the auditorium, "this is a democratic scene.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Pheralyn Dove, Special to The Inquirer
It is captivating because of its wildly diverse images, tones, textures and range of subjects. It is compelling because of its hard-driving intensity. And it is comprehensive because of its eclectic mix of methods and media. But perhaps the most exciting aspect of the American Color Print Society's annual members' exhibition at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts is that it will travel to the Soviet Union in June. Part of a historic first printmaking exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union, the exhibition will be shown at the State Museum in St. Petersburg.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bearded Soviet dissident appears on camera and makes an impassioned plea to his son - and all Americans - to continue protests against restrictive Soviet emigration policies. Vladimir Slepak, a 60-year-old electronics engineer and Hebrew teacher, has been trying to get out of the Soviet Union for the last 17 years. The videotape was shot in Moscow on April 14 by Lawrence Coughlin, a U.S. congressman and an amateur cinematographer, as a special favor to Slepak's son, Alexander.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters, USA Today and the New York Daily News.)
Apparently the Soviets have had enough of those burger ads snickering at their fashion sense. Yesterday they signed a contract with Pierre Cardin to give them patterns for men's and women's clothes. Tass reported that the designer would provide the government with fall-winter and spring-summer fashions (we don't know about svimwear) for men and women, which will be made with Soviet threads. Cardin has also agreed to open a Moscow store. HIGH-SPIRITED Ann Jillian, Teddy Pendergrass, Edward Kennedy Jr. and Sen. Bob Dole were honored Monday night at a packed Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington for overcoming physical handicaps.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
The Soviet Union is not merely in a time of transition, but rather in "big trouble. " Those were the words of Alexander Avanessov, a Soviet diplomat to the United Nations, who last week addressed a tiny audience at Glassboro State College on the topic of "Perestroika and the New World Order. " Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's perestroika economic and social reforms, instituted in late 1986, are far from being complete. The country's economy has worsened and the once ironclad Soviet political structure verges on total collapse, Avanessov said.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Gone are the Cold War days when the public debate surrounding U.S.-Soviet relations had all the depth of two boys in the schoolyard arguing over whose father would be the victor in a mythical match-up. Now, with the Reagan-Gorbachev summit at hand, it is clear that slowly the debate has moved to higher ground. Public interest in moving the U.S.-Soviet relationship beyond the age of one-dimensional adversaries is evident in the scores of seminars, speeches, cultural exhibits and news conferences planned to feed a hunger for information about the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Tonight, Ted Turner's "superstation" TBS presents the first of a three- part series, Portrait of the Soviet Union (at 9, and at 8:05 p.m. tomorrow and Tuesday). These three evenings of documentaries combine for a total of seven hours of breathtaking pictures and breathless narration - the technology is great, but where did the ideas go? This evening, our host, actor Roy Scheider, first focuses on "Mother Russia. " Looking fetchingly craggy while standing, inevitably, in front of the onion dome in Moscow's Red Square, Scheider offers the sights and sounds of the Soviet working class.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Forrest L. Black, Special to The Inquirer
An Orthodox priest with expertise in Russian affairs believes the Soviet Union is "in the midst of a struggle for survival. " "Liberalization is now taking on a spontaneous form - not from above any longer, but from the masses," the Rev. John J. Perich said at a Law Day program at the Delaware County Courthouse in Media last week. "No longer can the regime, which is growing older, suppress everyone and everything with the same vigor and strength as before; the composition of the elite is changing, and so is the rest of the world," he said.
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NEWS
September 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO could read 15,000 books, give or take a few hundred, was a man to be reckoned with. And Larry Riley was that man. But how to do the reckoning? He was a man whose spiritual journey took him to a Trappist monastery, probably the strictist order in the Roman Catholic Church, yet he was also a man who enjoyed handicapping race horses and cheering on the steeds at Philadelphia Park and the old Garden State track. He earned a Ph.D with a dissertation on the Bolshevik show trials in the Soviet Union instigated by Joseph Stalin in the 1930s to get rid of his rivals.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jules R. Lippert, 83, of Newtown Square, who worked to help Jews blocked by the Soviet Union from immigrating to Israel, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, of natural causes at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Lippert co-owned a prefabricated-house company, Hilton Lifetime Homes, in Blackwood. Beginning in the 1980s, he and his wife, Louise, began collecting and selling antiques. They specialized in small Victorian English items, particularly sewing tools used for fine needlework. Starting in the 1970s, the couple developed a passion for helping Jews who were forbidden to leave the Soviet Union for Israel.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA By Wednesday, more than 200 people had signed up to hear Iran's ambassador to the United Nations speak at Philadelphia's World Affairs Council. The event, scheduled for next week, had been billed as rare: Mohammad Khazaee, the most senior Iranian representative in the United States, generally does not speak outside the U.N. Then, on Thursday, the council abruptly canceled Khazaee's appearance. And on Friday, just days after President Obama preached diplomacy with Iran during his State of the Union address, the council put the blame for the cancellation on the State Department.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
WHO killed President Kennedy? Lee Harvey Oswald, of course. All the evidence points to him, and no one else. Why then, after 50 years, are there still people who deny this fact? Because Oswald was a Marxist, who supported Castro and defected to the Soviet Union, that's why. Oswald was a member of the liberal left, and the left has never been able to accept that one of their own was responsible for the death of the president. It was always easier to live in denial, and blame the assassination on a right-wing conspiracy, which simply never existed.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In October 1989, Trenton businessman Shelley M. Zeiger helped open what his family said was the first American restaurant in the Soviet Union. At 21 Komsomolskyi Prospekt in Moscow, TrenMos - named for Trenton and Moscow - opened two years before the ending of the Soviet Union in December 1991. In April 1992, Mr. Zeiger helped open TrenMos Bistro at 9 Ulitsa Ostozhenka, near the Kremlin. He sold both in 1994. At home, his family said, Mr. Zeiger brought to Trenton several Soviet and Russian performing groups in the 1980s and 1990s.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His grandfather escaped from the Treblinka death camp, his grandmother died there. Decades later, when Witold "Vic" Walczak returned to his family's native Poland, a young man amid the Solidarity protests of the 1980s, he got knocked around and strip-searched by police. "At that point, I knew I wanted to be a civil liberties attorney," said Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania. Today, Walczak helps lead the legal fight for what is fast becoming Pennsylvania's preeminent civil rights issue: gay marriage.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - An opinion survey commissioned by the Carnegie Endowment says that Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin has remained widely admired in Russia and other ex-Soviet nations, even though millions of people died under his brutal rule. The Carnegie report, released Friday, was based on the first-ever comparative opinion polls in Russia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia. It found that support for Stalin in Russia has actually increased since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. The report has concluded that public attitudes to the dictator have improved during Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's 13-year rule as the Kremlin has found Stalin's image useful in its efforts to tighten control.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Mark Palmer, 71, a forceful and influential diplomat who served as U.S. ambassador to Hungary during the collapse of communism, and who was a chief author of President Ronald Reagan's 1982 speech declaring that Marxism was headed toward "the ash heap of history," died Jan. 28 at his home in Washington. He had melanoma, his wife, Sushma Palmer, said. From his first visit to the Soviet Union when he was 19, Mr. Palmer recognized that the Russian people were different from the Soviet government.
NEWS
December 13, 2012
World-renowned Russian opera diva Galina Vishnevskaya, 86, who with her husband defied the Soviet regime to give shelter to writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn and suffered exile from her homeland, died Tuesday in Moscow. Moscow's Opera Center, which Ms. Vishnevskaya created, did not give a cause of death. Ms. Vishnevskaya and the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich married in 1955, frequently performed together, and used their star status in the Soviet Union to help friends in trouble. In the most notable example of their defiance of Communist authorities, they sheltered Solzhenitsyn at their country home for several years as he faced official reprisals.
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