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Soy Milk

NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Obamacare, organic soy milk, and birth control pills have proven to be a volatile mix for Eden Foods, a small, highly regarded natural foods company. Last year, the Clinton, Mich., company's owner, Michael Potter, sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, objecting to a provision in the Affordable Care Act that requires company health insurance plans to cover preventive medicine - including contraception. Citing his Catholic beliefs, Potter said he should not be forced to help his employees obtain birth control, or any other "lifestyle drugs" such as Viagra and hair-loss remedies.
FOOD
February 20, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
The fresh simplicity of a colorful salad is the perfect start, finish or accent to any meal. A well-chosen salad can be the most healthful of meals, especially when using ingredients that add to the nutritional bottom line and keep fat and calories to a minimum. Greens once considered exotic now appear regularly in local supermarkets, giving you greater versatility in putting together colorful and exciting salads. Nutty-flavored arugula and sharp-tasting radicchio are easy to find, making bowls of monochromatic chopped lettuce with a few sliced tomatoes a thing of the past.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
I WAS a teenage soda jerk. Nowadays, I'm just . . . a vegan columnist. Obviously, I don't drink the cow-derived milkshakes I used to guzzle at the end of a shift. But I still love the creamy goodness of a tall chocolate shake, minus the original's sad backstory. Fortunately, as I've predicted in earlier columns, vegan ice creams are proliferating in Philly. I know, ice-cream cones are fun, but those of us who want to mainline ice-cream deliciousness know that the milkshake is the format that delivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2008
Meals that promote good health don't have to taste like twigs and cardboard, claims Dr. John La Puma, who combined his expertise as a physician and a gourmet cook in the new book, "Chef MD's Big Book of Culinary Medicine. " Try a few of these recipes at home, keeping in mind that the ingredients have been specifically chosen and combined for their health benefits. SPICY GAZPACHO WITH CRAB 1 cup each, 1/4-inch diced unpeeled cucumber, yellow or orange bell pepper and seeded ripe, organic tomato 1/4 cup minced red onion 1 cup organic tomato juice 1/2 cup bottled clam juice 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce 1 cup canned, drained crabmeat Salt and freshly ground black pepper Optional garnishes: chopped fresh basil, finely diced avocado In a large bowl, combine the cucumber, bell pepper, tomato, onion, tomato and clam juices, vinegar, oil and hot pepper sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012
WINTER'S a great time for soup, if only because it's a great time for catching a cold. And what's better for restoring health than venerable chicken noodle soup? That ancient folk remedy is so well-known that science eventually weighed in on its mysterious power. Two get-better benefits were established: The steam from the hot broth helps to decongest; and the antioxidants in veggie-rich soups boost the immune system. Sorry, no chicken-specific gain was found. Soups are a great opportunity to work in more plant-based meals, especially at this time of year.
FOOD
April 19, 1998 | By Linda Drachman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soy might not be the word - or food - on everybody's lips, but if Marie Oser had her way, it certainly would be. Oser, author of The Soy of Cooking (Chronimed Publishing, $15.95), was in town recently to tape a segment for the locally produced national television program Home Matters, shown on the Discovery Channel. So what's so special about soy? Oser, as well as many physicians and nutritional experts, points to studies indicating that diets high in soy foods lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of many forms of cancer, heart disease and osteoporosis.
FOOD
October 23, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, if you're a Phillie, you never know what can make the difference in the postseason. It might be a clutch home run by a 40-year-old guy with a gut. Or, you know, it might be a little honey on your tuna-fish sandwich. That's what Ryan Howard eats on game day, according to team cook Joe Swanhart. "That's just the way he likes it," Swanhart says. It might be peanut butter and jelly, the sandwich of champions for Chase Utley and So Taguchi. "Smuckers strawberry is actually Chase's favorite," says Swanhart, who explains Utley's pregame preference as a combination of superstition and habit.
FOOD
August 19, 1998 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Perhaps you've been avoiding dessert because it's generally high in fat. You've heard that dairy products contain high levels of cholesterol and fat and have been implicated as a contributing factor in strokes, heart disease, and even some forms of cancer. Or maybe you're unable to digest lactose. Without rich dairy ingredients, you reason, desserts would be severely restricted in flavor. Not so! Widely available, easy to use, wholesome - and nondairy - ingredients provide the richness and texture associated with traditionally decadent desserts.
FOOD
July 9, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Summertime is here, and everyone wants the living to be easy. When it comes to warm-weather cooking, easy can be a lighter menu and less time spent in a hot kitchen. For the health-conscious cook, new soy-based foods help expand outdoor cooking beyond steaks on the grill. Head to the grill for a meatless barbecue outing, where the star will be Grilled Tempeh Kebabs accompanied by a potato salad alternative I call Creamy Herbed Potato Chill. Tempeh, a hearty soy food originating in traditional Indonesian cuisine, is fiber-rich and a generous source of calcium, B Vitamins and iron.
FOOD
September 28, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
"I'm never happier than when I'm in the kitchen," Marie Oser says by telephone from her home in southern California, not far from Los Angeles. "I'm in there when I should be doing other things. " A Philadelphia native and alum of St. Joseph's University, Oser moved to California in 1987 and recently published her first cookbook, "Luscious Low- Fat Desserts" (Chariot Publishing, $11.95), with an eye on fat-free indulgence. The 85 recipes for cakes, pies, cookies, muffins, puddings and sorbets contain no eggs or dairy products, making them ideal for strict vegetarians and persons who are lactose-intolerant.
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