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Soy Protein

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FOOD
August 20, 1995 | By Edward Blonz, FOR THE INQUIRER
A study in the New England Journal of Medicine reported on the effect of soy proteins on lowering the level of cholesterol and fats in our blood. Such findings may bring about an oat-bran-like craze for soy-protein-spiked processed foods, but ideally this won't be the case. While the study touts soy protein, it may be other compounds in soybeans that are responsible for the bulk of the benefits. The NEJM study involved "meta analysis" - a powerful statistical technique that brings together a number of studies that attempt to answer a similar question.
FOOD
June 25, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sweet, creamy milkshakes are a summer favorite. And how can we not love them - except for all the fat, calories and cholesterol? While milkshakes traditionally are made with cow's milk and rich ice cream, there is a healthier approach to this summer standard, using soymilk blended with silken tofu or soy ice cream. Based on the popularity of soy protein powders, there must be many people who believe that these, mixed with juice or milk, make great shakes. These drinks, some claim, offer the much touted health benefits of adding soy to the diet.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. in recent years has expanded beyond its chemical roots and bought food and seed companies in its quest to play a bigger role in feeding America. Yesterday, the Wilmington giant said its Protein Technologies International unit in St. Louis has formed a joint venture with General Mills Inc. to develop and market foods with high soy content. The joint venture hopes to capitalize on the upsurge in demand for soy-rich foods since they were recognized in October by the Food and Drug Administration to help reduce the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plate at the restaurant in Beijing was laden with thin, yellowish sheets made from soybeans, called tofu skin. Peter Lelkes used them as the chef intended, to wrap vegetables into bite-size morsels. But as he ate, the biomedical engineer's thoughts strayed from the Chinese restaurant to his lab in Philadelphia. The tofu-based "skin," he realized, made him think of the real thing. A decade later, that chance encounter in a Chinese restaurant has led to a soy-based "skin substitute" - a wound dressing that a start-up company has licensed for use on diabetic ulcers, burns, and other injuries the body cannot readily heal on its own. Lelkes and his Temple University colleagues say the product has shown promise in animal studies, and the company, Eqalix in Reston, Va., is raising money to seek FDA approval.
FOOD
September 3, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soy is in the news again, this time for lowering total blood cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and triglycerides. So presumably, adding tofu, tempeh, soy flour or soy milk to your diet could reduce your risks for heart disease, the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the United States. Not long ago we were hearing that the plant estrogens in soy products might also be responsible for the lower rates of breast and prostate cancer in Asian people whose diets are high in soy products.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1988 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
No matter how much money Oscar Mayer and Hormel spend to advertise the purity of their frankfurters, it's still tough to believe that those tasty little devils are good for you. It's those nasty words on the label that leave a bad taste in your mouth, not to mention a mine field in your arteries. Words like nitrates, calcium lactate, whey and vegetable starch. And now Protein Technologies, a subisidary of Ralston Purina, wants the U.S. Department of Agriculture to suspend rules that limit additives in the weiner.
FOOD
May 14, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Medical and nutrition professionals agree that Americans need to significantly reduce the amount of fat and animal products they consume in order to reduce their risk of heart disease and many forms of cancer. In October, the FDA stated that 25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a low-fat diet, may help users lower their cholesterol. How can you persuade your family to give up favorite meals? The good news is: You don't have to. TVP, or textured vegetable protein, is a very low-fat meat substitute used in many foods.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've heard that tempeh, black cohosh, and other unfamiliar edibles and herbs can fight the effects of menopause. But do they really work? And are they safe? The 41,000-member American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has just issued guidelines for doctors trying to answer those questions. Many menopausal women, the organization says, shy away from supplementing their ebbing estrogen with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Although hormone therapy has both short- and long-term benefits, including relieving hot flashes and protecting bone density, it can have bothersome side effects and may increase the risk of breast cancer.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services and the Wall Street Journal also contributed to this report
SUPER CYBERHERO: Marvel Comics today is to claim the distinction of launching the first on-line comic book. The first dial-ups, downloads or whatever of the new book "Generation X," featuring the X-Men, will occur on CompuServe (Go XMEN). (You will, of course, also be able to buy it in stores.) After midnight tonight, superhero-loving key dancers may also find "Generation X" thusly, Cox News Service reports: Internet (ftp host: alpha.vyne.com in the directory pub/marvel)
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
DuPont Co., in its biggest acquisition since the purchase of seed company Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. in the late 1990s, has agreed to pay $5.8 billion for Danisco, a Danish company that makes enzymes used to produce chemicals and fuels from plants. The deal for Danisco, a partner in DuPont's fledgling effort in Tennessee to produce ethanol from corncobs, is designed to accelerate the Wilmington company's gradual shift in raw materials - under way for more than a decade - from fossil fuels to renewable resources.
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NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plate at the restaurant in Beijing was laden with thin, yellowish sheets made from soybeans, called tofu skin. Peter Lelkes used them as the chef intended, to wrap vegetables into bite-size morsels. But as he ate, the biomedical engineer's thoughts strayed from the Chinese restaurant to his lab in Philadelphia. The tofu-based "skin," he realized, made him think of the real thing. A decade later, that chance encounter in a Chinese restaurant has led to a soy-based "skin substitute" - a wound dressing that a start-up company has licensed for use on diabetic ulcers, burns, and other injuries the body cannot readily heal on its own. Lelkes and his Temple University colleagues say the product has shown promise in animal studies, and the company, Eqalix in Reston, Va., is raising money to seek FDA approval.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
A COUPLE OF weeks ago, I stood beside chef David Silver as he handed out samples of a new product at the Callowhill Whole Foods Market. "What is it?" one gray-haired fellow inquired, taking a bite. "It's Beyond Meat," said Silver, seeming to allow the guy another chew or two before adding, "It's a vegan meat. " Rather than responding with a comical spit-take, the man nodded cheerily and said, "Well, I don't like 'vegan' - but I like this!" Silver has heard that a lot, traveling around the region training staff and whipping up recipes to showcase the new product, one that aspires to compete with meat on its own terms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | Vance Lehmkuhl
JULY IS A big month for U.S. rowing at the top level: Over in Camden on the Cooper River, the 2012 USRowing Club National Championships began Wednesday and continue through this weekend. Shortly thereafter, the USRowing Senior National team heads to London for the Olympics. Other than Philly's longstanding love of rowing culture, what does all this have to with "V for Veg"? Well, it happens that the Olympic rowers will officially be powered by a vegan snack product, The Perfect Snaque, which you can also check out at the Camden event.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
DuPont Co., in its biggest acquisition since the purchase of seed company Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. in the late 1990s, has agreed to pay $5.8 billion for Danisco, a Danish company that makes enzymes used to produce chemicals and fuels from plants. The deal for Danisco, a partner in DuPont's fledgling effort in Tennessee to produce ethanol from corncobs, is designed to accelerate the Wilmington company's gradual shift in raw materials - under way for more than a decade - from fossil fuels to renewable resources.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've heard that tempeh, black cohosh, and other unfamiliar edibles and herbs can fight the effects of menopause. But do they really work? And are they safe? The 41,000-member American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has just issued guidelines for doctors trying to answer those questions. Many menopausal women, the organization says, shy away from supplementing their ebbing estrogen with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Although hormone therapy has both short- and long-term benefits, including relieving hot flashes and protecting bone density, it can have bothersome side effects and may increase the risk of breast cancer.
FOOD
June 25, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sweet, creamy milkshakes are a summer favorite. And how can we not love them - except for all the fat, calories and cholesterol? While milkshakes traditionally are made with cow's milk and rich ice cream, there is a healthier approach to this summer standard, using soymilk blended with silken tofu or soy ice cream. Based on the popularity of soy protein powders, there must be many people who believe that these, mixed with juice or milk, make great shakes. These drinks, some claim, offer the much touted health benefits of adding soy to the diet.
FOOD
May 14, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Medical and nutrition professionals agree that Americans need to significantly reduce the amount of fat and animal products they consume in order to reduce their risk of heart disease and many forms of cancer. In October, the FDA stated that 25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a low-fat diet, may help users lower their cholesterol. How can you persuade your family to give up favorite meals? The good news is: You don't have to. TVP, or textured vegetable protein, is a very low-fat meat substitute used in many foods.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. in recent years has expanded beyond its chemical roots and bought food and seed companies in its quest to play a bigger role in feeding America. Yesterday, the Wilmington giant said its Protein Technologies International unit in St. Louis has formed a joint venture with General Mills Inc. to develop and market foods with high soy content. The joint venture hopes to capitalize on the upsurge in demand for soy-rich foods since they were recognized in October by the Food and Drug Administration to help reduce the risk of heart disease.
FOOD
July 1, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
"There's a meatless burger war going on, and people don't even know it," chirps "Boca Buddy" Kristin Nihill. Her mere presence, one might suggest, is proof of the fact. In tandem with fellow "Boca Buddy" Jennifer Lotsoff, the two have been serving an eight-week tour of duty, crisscrossing the country's supermarket aisles this summer with griddle in hand, trying to win new partisans for the Boca Burger cause. It's the kind of national taste-test tour one might expect from a deep-pocketed corporate brand of pizza or diet cola.
FOOD
September 3, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soy is in the news again, this time for lowering total blood cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and triglycerides. So presumably, adding tofu, tempeh, soy flour or soy milk to your diet could reduce your risks for heart disease, the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the United States. Not long ago we were hearing that the plant estrogens in soy products might also be responsible for the lower rates of breast and prostate cancer in Asian people whose diets are high in soy products.
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