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FOOD
November 1, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Most cuisines have key ingredients that give their foods an unmistakable signature. When cooking French, you'll be needing butter and cream. Cooking Italian? Better check for garlic and oregano. If your meal will have a Chinese or Japanese flavor, it would be almost impossible to prepare it without using soy sauce. In the Far East, soy sauce is an ancient and essential ingredient used to flavor a variety of foods, such as meats, poultry, vegetables, soups and fish. It's also used in marinades and forms the base for other sauces.
FOOD
August 28, 2008
Makes about 6 servings as a side dish 1.    Rinse sesame leaves in cold water, then drain. 2.    Combine the soy sauce, sugar, garlic, and chili pepper in a small pot and heat over medium flame until liquid just begins to boil. Reduce heat, add sesame leaves, and simmer for three to five minutes, turning often. Remove from heat. Use a strainer and remove leaves from the liquid. Set strainer over the pot so that the liquid drains back into the pot, and let cool.
NEWS
June 21, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - H.J. Heinz Co. said Monday that it agreed to buy Foodstar, a Chinese food company that makes soy sauces and fermented bean curd, for $165 million. The deal would give the U.S. ketchup maker a bigger foothold in China, boosting sales in that region to $300 million a year. It would also give the Pittsburgh company its first stake in fast-growing China's $2 billion soy sauce market. The acquisition from the private equity firm Transpac Industrial Holdings Ltd. also includes a possible extra payout in 2014 if Foodstar has strong performance as a Heinz brand.
FOOD
March 26, 1986 | By SAM GUGINO, Special to the Daily News
At first glance it seems like any small supermarket, somewhat larger than a 7-11, much smaller than a Pathmark. The aisles have rows and rows of packaged, canned and bottled items. There's a frozen food section in the back, a small meat case in the corner next to the fresh produce. It's not the shelves that are different, it's what's on them - different, unless, of course, you're Korean, Japanese or Southeast Asian. This is Dong Dae Moon, one of three Oriental supermarkets that have all opened within the past four months.
FOOD
April 22, 1987 | By DEBORAH LICKLIDER, Daily News Food Editor
Simple food is the cuisine of kings. Forget pheasant under glass . . . a perfectly fried chicken leg is what memories are made of. Forget Gateau St. Honore . . . think of a golden brown wedge of warm apple pie. Forget Rice and Duck Meat in Lotus Leaves . . . think Fried Rice. Fried Rice is a simple food that is simply wonderful. First there's the rice: plump, a little bit sticky so that you can eat it with chopsticks, coated with soy sauce and the faint taste of oil. Then there are the surprises stuck between the rice.
FOOD
February 12, 2009 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This quick stir-fry of broccoli and flank steak comes from Lily Chinn, a popular cooking teacher in the San Francisco Bay area. The beauty of this recipe lies in its simplicity.   Flank Steak Broccoli Beef 1. In a bowl, compbine the steak with the cornstarch, soy sauce, garlic and ginger. Set aside 2. In a large heavy skillet or wok, heat 3 tablespoons of the oil over high heat. Add the broccoli and season with salt; saute for 1 minute. Add the water, cover, and steam until barely tender, 3 to 4 minutes, lowering the heat to prevent scorching.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 4-6 servings Kosher or sea salt 1 pound of Chinese long beans or green beans, sliced into 2-inch pieces 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce, or more as needed 1/4 cup no-salt-added homemade or store-bought vegetable broth 1/2 teaspoon light brown sugar 2 tablespoons peanut oil 1/2 cup dry-roasted, unsalted peanuts 4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed 3 or 4 dried arbol chili peppers, stemmed and thinly sliced (seeded,...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012
ROB APTAKER'S SHIITAKE SAUTÉ 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ teaspoon sesame oil 4 cups shiitake mushrooms, sliced 2 tablespoons tamari or low-sodium soy sauce In a frying pan, heat oils over medium heat. Add mushrooms and sauté until they give up their liquid, about 5-8 minutes. Season with soy sauce and serve over brown rice. Serves 2-4. MASSIVE MUSHROOM CHILI 1 cup each kidney, pinto and black beans, cooked 1 to 2 pounds of fresh shiitake or wild mushrooms of your choice, chopped 2 to 4 fresh tomatoes, diced 1 green bell pepper, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 2 to 4 carrots, sliced 2 to 4 celery sticks, sliced 1 onion, diced 5-plus garlic cloves, crushed 1 to 2 zucchini, chopped Juice of 1 lemon One 12- to 14-ounce can tomato puree One 6-ounce can tomato paste 2 to 4 tablespoons dark brown sugar 4-plus tablespoons chili powder 4-plus tablespoons cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon cayenne 2 to 4 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 1 to 2 tablespoons each dried, or 1 handful each chopped fresh basil and thyme leaves Salt, pepper to taste Simmer all ingredients but herbs for one hour.
FOOD
August 24, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
One of Peking's more famous dishes is lamb, marinated in a mixture of soy sauce and sherry, stir-fried with garlic and scallions and finished with a simple, sweetened soy sauce. The whole process takes less than half an hour, yet the result is rich, full-flavored and satisfying. But suppose you don't like, can't find or can't afford lamb? Then consider an updated version of the dish made with convenient turkey cutlets. Turkey has enough flavor of its own to stand up to distinctive seasonings like garlic, scallions and sesame oil. The cutlets are available in most large supermarkets, and though they are more expensive than bone-in parts, they are still affordable.
FOOD
January 1, 2016
This recipe from Nongkran Daks' most recent cookbook might persuade you to go in the Thai direction. She's chef-owner of Thai Basil in Chantilly, Va., a master chef, and cooking instructor, who has collected her most approachable dishes in this slim volume. As she explains in the book, drunken spaghetti came about in the 1960s, when American soldiers began arriving in Thailand in large numbers. They were homesick, so Thai cooks "Americanized" their traditional drunken noodles by substituting thinner wheat pasta for the wide noodles.
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FOOD
September 15, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 6 servings 1/2 pound of chicken, shrimp, pork, or a combination of the three, chopped into small pieces 2 eggs beaten 1/4 cup frozen peas 3 to 4 cups of cooked rice (at least a day old; the rice must be cold) 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 3 tablespoon peanut oil Dash of white pepper 1 onion finely chopped 2 finely chopped scallions, including the green part 1/2 to 1 cup bean sprouts 1 cup shaved cabbage - long, thin strips 2 stalks of celery, thinly sliced 1 peeled carrot, cut into matchsticks (julienne)
FOOD
September 1, 2016
Makes 6 servings 2 tablespoons peanut oil 1 tablespoon peeled, shredded/grated fresh ginger root 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 2 bunches asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces (18 ounces total) 2 scallions, white and green parts, thinly sliced 8 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and some cut in half on the diagonal 2 tablespoons black bean garlic sauce or chili garlic paste 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 2 teaspoons water 1 cup shelled edamame 1 packed cup baby spinach leaves 8 ounces brown rice vermicelli (mai fun)
FOOD
August 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 2 to 3 servings 2 tablespoons safflower oil, sesame oil, or other vegetable oil 1 cup thinly sliced scallions (white and green parts), plus 11/2 tablespoons coarsely chopped scallions (white and light-green parts), for optional garnish 1 cup chopped celery 1/2 cup seeded, chopped red bell pepper 1 to 11/4 teaspoons finely minced fresh culinary lavender spikes (bloom heads) or coarsely ground dried culinary lavender buds 11/4 teaspoons minced or grated peeled fresh ginger root 1 to 11/2 cups trimmed and coarsely diced thick-sliced baked ham or pre-cooked ham steak 21/2 cups cooked and cooled long-grain white or brown rice 1/2 cup golden or dark seedless raisins, or a combination 21/2 to 3 tablespoons low- sodium soy sauce, or more as needed 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 11/2 tablespoons salted peanuts or cashews, for garnish (optional)
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 4-6 servings Kosher or sea salt 1 pound of Chinese long beans or green beans, sliced into 2-inch pieces 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce, or more as needed 1/4 cup no-salt-added homemade or store-bought vegetable broth 1/2 teaspoon light brown sugar 2 tablespoons peanut oil 1/2 cup dry-roasted, unsalted peanuts 4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed 3 or 4 dried arbol chili peppers, stemmed and thinly sliced (seeded,...
FOOD
January 1, 2016
This recipe from Nongkran Daks' most recent cookbook might persuade you to go in the Thai direction. She's chef-owner of Thai Basil in Chantilly, Va., a master chef, and cooking instructor, who has collected her most approachable dishes in this slim volume. As she explains in the book, drunken spaghetti came about in the 1960s, when American soldiers began arriving in Thailand in large numbers. They were homesick, so Thai cooks "Americanized" their traditional drunken noodles by substituting thinner wheat pasta for the wide noodles.
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloody delicious  The most complicated thing on the menu at Brick & Mortar may be the Bloody Mary, made from general manager Len Wood's own personal recipe. The 22 secret ingredients include 15 spices, including ginger and turmeric, three hot sauces, soy sauce, horseradish, and fresh juice from celery, roasted red peppers, lemons and limes. It's available by the bottle at the restaurant, and will keep for three weeks or longer, according to Wood, who advises mixing it with Irish whiskey.
FOOD
August 28, 2015
Slippery and savory, this unusual combination of ingredients - Italian pasta, Asian elements, store-bought cabbage/coleslaw mix, and lime juice - works surprisingly well when you're up for just a bit of cooking and a light meal on a warm summer night. Basil-Cilantro Noodles 4 servings, plus leftovers   Kosher salt 12-ounces dried whole- grain linguine 1/2 medium onion 1 large clove garlic One 1-inch piece fresh ginger root 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 2 cups shredded cabbage or coleslaw mix 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 2 limes Small handful cilantro, plus more for garnish Small handful basil, plus a few leaves for garnish 1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
FOOD
July 31, 2015
Peaches may be at their savory best when combined with pork and basil, as they are in these novel quesadillas. Peach Quesadillas 7 ounces fresh pork sausage (3 or 4 links) 1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder 1 medium red onion, diced 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce Freshly ground black pepper 3 ripe peaches 1 tablespoon olive oil 6 or 7 large basil leaves Eight 6-inch corn tortillas 6 ounces grated sharp white cheddar cheese 1. Line a plate with paper towels.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meneko Spigner McBeth was raised with Japanese delicacies, indulging in handmade egg-and-cucumber sushi rolls as a young girl, a child-friendly creation whipped up by her grandmother, a native of Japan. McBeth continued to try new twists on Asian cuisine as she grew up in Pemberton, but what she really fell for was the Play-Doh-like, fiery, green wasabi. That adoration was only topped when she paired it with the soy sauce and shaved ginger often found decorating sushi plates. "That was the way I had to have my sushi from now on," she said of the first time she sampled the trio together, a combination she uses to dress tuna and other fish.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I should have known, when the sun was shining brightly on the first perfect spring afternoon after so many wicked winter days, that it would be tough for 10-year-olds to focus on cooking. On top of that, my fifth grade chefs had just completed six days of PSSA testing at Henry Lawton Elementary and they were having a hard time standing still, much less concentrating on one recipe - let alone two. Frankly, it would have been a good day to make scrambled eggs. But the plan, in my continuing quest for healthy, low-cost cooking, was to teach how to use up fresh ingredients - in this case, ginger, cilantro, and garlic - by employing them in more than one recipe: turkey lettuce wraps and corn salad.
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