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Space Capsule

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NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An unmanned space capsule carrying medical samples from the International Space Station splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, completing the first official private interstellar shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA. The California-based SpaceX company gently guided the Dragon into the water via parachutes at 12:22 p.m., a couple of hundred miles off the Baja California coast. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station used a giant robot arm to release the commercial cargo ship 255 miles up. SpaceX provided updates of the journey home via Twitter, including a video of the Dragon separating from the space station.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In less than five years, a married couple could be on their way toward Mars in an audacious, bare-bones private mission that would slingshot them around the planet, under a plan announced Wednesday by a financial tycoon and his team. The voyage to Mars and back would be a cosmic no-frills flight that would take the husband-and-wife astronauts as close as 100 miles to the planet, but it would also mean being cooped up for 16 months in a cramped space capsule half the size of an RV. The private, nonprofit project will get initial money from the multimillionaire investment consultant Dennis Tito, the first space tourist.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - SpaceX's Dragon space capsule, which last week became the world's first privately built and operated spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station, is scheduled to return to Earth on Thursday morning. The unmanned capsule is set to splash down at 11:44 a.m. Philadelphia time in the Pacific Ocean hundreds of miles west of Southern California. It will be the culmination of a historic mission carried out by the Hawthorne, Calif.-based company, officially known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp.
NEWS
May 7, 2007
And then there were two. The death Thursday of Walter M. "Wally" Schirra Jr. at age 84 spurred fond memories of those halcyon days of early space flight when he and six others became America's first astronauts. These men, the Mercury 7, had "the right stuff," as novelist Tom Wolfe later dubbed it. They became Cold War heroes. Gone now are Schirra, Alan Shepard, Virgil "Gus" Grissom, L. Gordon Cooper, and Donald K. "Deke" Slayton. Only John Glenn and Scott Carpenter still walk on Earth.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "THE SIGNAL," tech-savvy college kids on a cross-country road trip take a detour to confront the Internet troll who's been taunting them. This sidetrack leads them to the middle of nowhere, and to a sinister rural shack inhabited by . . . the Blair Witch? Leatherface? I'd say that you're guess is as good as mine, but it's not, since I've seen "The Signal," and I know what awaits these kids. But I can't tell you, can't even hint at it, because the movie's shift in direction is so radical, its surprises deserve to be preserved.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the late Yuri Gagarin, the first space traveler, is still out there somewhere, he must have looked on in amazement at what happened here yesterday. In the first such auction ever, Sotheby's sold more than 200 items from the heyday of the Soviet space program, including a dozen pieces of memorabilia connected with Gagarin's historic, 108-minute flight April 12, 1961. Gagarin's widow, Valentina, was on hand, watching from a VIP box above the auction floor as everything from a Soyuz space capsule to moon rocks were auctioned off to bidders jamming the room and phoning from around the world.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE one-man show, a staple of theater, tends to be less welcome on the big screen. Box-office numbers indicate that you didn't want to see Robert Redford alone on a boat in "All is Lost," and you didn't want to see Ryan Reynolds in that coffin in "Buried. " You consented to see Sandra Bullock in a space capsule in "Gravity," but only because you knew that George Clooney popped in from time to time. Which brings us to "Locke," comprising 86 minutes of Tom Hardy in the cab of a BMW. I highly recommend it, with the caveat that movie critics tend to like these cinematic experiments more than normal human beings do. There's a tightroper's daring to movies like "Locke," the way they go against the grain of blockbuster-ism - in this age of 3-D/FX, here's a story set in one place, inhabited by one actor.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ALIENS FROM OUTER SPACE HAVE INVADED U.S. SENATE! A dozen U.S. senators have been "exposed" as space aliens, and many of them - tongues firmly planted in cheeks - have admitted it. The news, such as it is, comes from the June 7 issue of the Weekly World News, a supermarket tabloid. "It's all true," it quotes Sen. Phil Gramm (R., Texas) as saying. "We are space aliens. I'm amazed that it's taken you so long to find out. " Others named as space aliens are: Sens. Dennis DeConcini (D., Ariz.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | By William Hershey, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Twenty-five years after the historic flight in Friendship 7 that made him the first American to orbit the Earth, Sen. John Glenn (D., Ohio) is ready to return to space. "When they get around to doing geriatric studies," said Glenn, now 65, "I'm number one in line, and don't forget it. " He was 40 on Feb. 20, 1962, when he made three orbits of Earth, a trip that he said opened many opportunities for him - helping make him a millionaire and a senator, although he did not win his seat until his third race, in 1974.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Three astronauts back from station ALMATY, Kazakhstan - A Soyuz space capsule carrying two Russians and an American touched down safely Friday on the sweeping steppes of central Kazakhstan, ending the men's 163-day stay on the International Space Station. Anton Shkaplerov, Anatoly Ivanishin, and NASA's Daniel Burbank returned to Earth as the Russian-made module landed on schedule at a remote site north of Arkalyk. - AP Denmark nabs 3; terror plot alleged COPENHAGEN, Denmark - Three men have been arrested in Copenhagen on suspicion of plotting a terror attack after police found them with automatic weapons and ammunition, Denmark's intelligence service said Friday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "THE SIGNAL," tech-savvy college kids on a cross-country road trip take a detour to confront the Internet troll who's been taunting them. This sidetrack leads them to the middle of nowhere, and to a sinister rural shack inhabited by . . . the Blair Witch? Leatherface? I'd say that you're guess is as good as mine, but it's not, since I've seen "The Signal," and I know what awaits these kids. But I can't tell you, can't even hint at it, because the movie's shift in direction is so radical, its surprises deserve to be preserved.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE one-man show, a staple of theater, tends to be less welcome on the big screen. Box-office numbers indicate that you didn't want to see Robert Redford alone on a boat in "All is Lost," and you didn't want to see Ryan Reynolds in that coffin in "Buried. " You consented to see Sandra Bullock in a space capsule in "Gravity," but only because you knew that George Clooney popped in from time to time. Which brings us to "Locke," comprising 86 minutes of Tom Hardy in the cab of a BMW. I highly recommend it, with the caveat that movie critics tend to like these cinematic experiments more than normal human beings do. There's a tightroper's daring to movies like "Locke," the way they go against the grain of blockbuster-ism - in this age of 3-D/FX, here's a story set in one place, inhabited by one actor.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In less than five years, a married couple could be on their way toward Mars in an audacious, bare-bones private mission that would slingshot them around the planet, under a plan announced Wednesday by a financial tycoon and his team. The voyage to Mars and back would be a cosmic no-frills flight that would take the husband-and-wife astronauts as close as 100 miles to the planet, but it would also mean being cooped up for 16 months in a cramped space capsule half the size of an RV. The private, nonprofit project will get initial money from the multimillionaire investment consultant Dennis Tito, the first space tourist.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An unmanned space capsule carrying medical samples from the International Space Station splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, completing the first official private interstellar shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA. The California-based SpaceX company gently guided the Dragon into the water via parachutes at 12:22 p.m., a couple of hundred miles off the Baja California coast. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station used a giant robot arm to release the commercial cargo ship 255 miles up. SpaceX provided updates of the journey home via Twitter, including a video of the Dragon separating from the space station.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Now that NASA has mothballed its fleet of space shuttles, the space agency needs a new ride to the International Space Station. On Friday, NASA handed out $1.1 billion in contracts to three companies to privately develop rockets and spacecraft for what could be the next step in manned spaceflight. The announcement was made by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on a cloudless day from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The winners included Hawthorne, Calif.-based rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, and Boeing Co., which develops spacecraft in Huntington Beach, Calif., and uses rocket engines made by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - SpaceX's Dragon space capsule, which last week became the world's first privately built and operated spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station, is scheduled to return to Earth on Thursday morning. The unmanned capsule is set to splash down at 11:44 a.m. Philadelphia time in the Pacific Ocean hundreds of miles west of Southern California. It will be the culmination of a historic mission carried out by the Hawthorne, Calif.-based company, officially known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Three astronauts back from station ALMATY, Kazakhstan - A Soyuz space capsule carrying two Russians and an American touched down safely Friday on the sweeping steppes of central Kazakhstan, ending the men's 163-day stay on the International Space Station. Anton Shkaplerov, Anatoly Ivanishin, and NASA's Daniel Burbank returned to Earth as the Russian-made module landed on schedule at a remote site north of Arkalyk. - AP Denmark nabs 3; terror plot alleged COPENHAGEN, Denmark - Three men have been arrested in Copenhagen on suspicion of plotting a terror attack after police found them with automatic weapons and ammunition, Denmark's intelligence service said Friday.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2011 | By Donna Blankinship and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
SEATTLE - Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen and aerospace pioneer Burt Rutan are building the world's biggest plane to help launch cargo and astronauts into space, in the latest of several ventures fueled by technology tycoons clamoring to write America's next chapter in spaceflight. Their plans, unveiled Tuesday, call for a twin-fuselage aircraft with wings longer than a football field to carry a rocket high into the atmosphere and drop it, avoiding the need for a launchpad and the expense of additional rocket fuel.
SPORTS
April 14, 2009
CLEARWATER, Fla. - On black-armband days like this, you think dark thoughts of loss, the sudden taking of comrades with whom you shared days, weeks, months, years, decades and generations, traveling with a ballclub as many intertwined lives were weathered like driftwood on a tropical beach that suddenly became storm-tossed and gray. Rich Ashburn was taken from us after a Phillies victory in Shea Stadium Sept. 9, 1997. We all know where we were and what we were doing when news of his death in a Manhattan hotel room broke on Angelo Cataldi's WIP morning show.
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