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Spacecraft

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NEWS
February 13, 2001 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defying tremendous odds, scientists yesterday landed a spacecraft without legs on the surface of an asteroid 196 million miles from Earth and got it to send a beacon home. The spacecraft took close-up pictures of the boulder-strewn surface of Eros 433 as it floated gently down. Cheers rose from the hundreds of people gathered at the site of mission control, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, when the radio beacon got through. "This is the first time a spacecraft has landed on a small body," said Robert Farquhar, the mission director.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has a crude computer that was built before the Apple II. It has one dead radio receiver and one crippled one. It was built to last four to six years, but now it's nine years later and it's chugging along, the little spacecraft that could. It has been modified and coaxed, cajoled and babied, and it has responded, a proud dowager ready for her next performance before the public. That performance will take place later this week, as Voyager 2, which already has visited Jupiter and Saturn, becomes the first spacecraft to fly by Uranus, the seventh planet from the sun and more than 1.8 billion miles from Earth.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NASA's next mission promises to be more than just a journey to Saturn. Cassini, a $3.4 billion spacecraft to be launched Oct. 13, will make a four-year tour through the hundreds of intricate rings and 18 mysterious moons that surround the distant planet. When it arrives in 2004, the spacecraft will drop a probe onto one of Saturn's moons, Titan, revealing for the first time the surface of this smog-shrouded world, which may harbor volcanoes, oceans, and even the starting materials for life.
NEWS
August 25, 2004
An Aug. 5 editorial on NASA's Messenger space probe misstated the function of the "gravity assist" the satellite will use on its approach to the planet Mercury. In Messenger's case, the gravity assist is used to slow the spacecraft down.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1999 | by Tom Di Nardo , For the Daily News
Without fanfare, NASA's Terra satellite will roll out of Building 100 of the Lockheed Martin plant in Valley Forge tonight. The NASA spacecraft, flagship of the Earth Observing System project, will be the last to be built at the plant and will send back to scientists the most complete information about Earth yet collected. Its departure will mark the end of an era in the Philadelphia area, once on the cutting edge of aerospace design, since Lockheed Martin has moved its Missiles and Space division to Sunnyvale, Calif.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW - A Russian spacecraft on its way to Mars with 12 tons of toxic fuel is stuck circling the wrong planet: ours. And it could come crashing back to Earth in a couple of weeks if engineers can't coax it back on track. Space experts were hopeful yesterday that the space probe's silent engines can be fired to send it off to Mars. If not, it will plummet to Earth. But most U.S. space debris experts think that the fuel on board would explode harmlessly in the upper atmosphere and never reach the ground.
LIVING
September 27, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NASA lost a spacecraft last week, but administrator Daniel Goldin will be emphasizing the positive on Wednesday when he speaks at the Franklin Institute on NASA's accomplishments. NASA, under Goldin, has flown some spectacular successes - the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope, the newly launched Chandra X-ray satellite, the Galileo mission to Jupiter, and the Mars Pathfinder and Global Surveyor spacecraft, to name just a few. And there are many more to come, including another Mars landing this December.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Voyager 2 came as close to Philadelphia yesterday as the Franklin Institute could manage. Using cuts from nine hours of film footage of the spacecraft's approach to Neptune and its moon Triton last week, the Institute's astronomy and education specialists pieced together a 40-minute program that clearly wowed the audience. "When it was launched in 1977, you didn't think much of it," said Otis Davis, 60, a space buff from the city's East Oak Lane neighborhood. "This is only the third time since I was in school that I have visited (the Institute)
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
October is Stamp Collecting Month, and the U.S. Postal Service is joining the celebration with a promotion of its own - a booklet of 29-cent commemoratives depicting the universe and spacecraft. The $5.80 booklet of two panes of 10 stamps each will augment this year's theme of "Journey to a New Frontier - Collect Stamps. " First-day ceremonies will be held Tuesday at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. The booklet of stamps features the moon and the nine planets.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Special to The Inquirer
When Justin Patrick Linick grows up - although he'll still probably wonder how many is a billion or a trillion or a zillion - he will be able to say that he was named in honor of a place where enormous numbers were comprehended and fantasies were made real. Justin's parents are part of the 5,000 people who make up the Jet Propulsion Laboratory family - that's JPL for short, that's Justin's monogram, too - where the 12-year mission of Voyager 2 has been directed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University is racing to be the first college on the moon. Since 2011, a team of faculty, researchers, and students has been hatching "Lunar Lion," a robotic spacecraft that is four feet in diameter and weighs 500 pounds. The team hopes that by landing in December 2015 and completing a precise series of tasks, it will win an international competition known as the Google Lunar Xprize. "What we are doing was once the business of national governments, and now we, a university, are doing this," said Michael Paul, director of space systems initiatives at the university's Applied Research Lab. The project costs $60 million, and donors have provided more than one-third of that amount.
NEWS
April 3, 2013
Yvonne Brill, a pioneer in spacecraft propulsion who suspended a promising career to raise three children and then returned to work full time to achieve her greatest engineering successes, died Wednesday at a hospital in Princeton. She had complications from breast cancer, said her son Matthew Brill of Swedesboro, N.J. Ms. Brill was internationally respected in her field and spoke openly about the struggles she faced in being devoted to family and work. As a specialist in the chemistry of propulsion, she made vital contributions to the operation of the orbiting space satellites that have become essential to modern life, placing the most remote areas of the globe in virtually instantaneous communication.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Scott Gold
Los Angeles Times PASADENA, Calif. - Three weeks from Sunday night, an amiable, whip-smart engineer named Ray Baker will be staring into his computer screen at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, hopeful and helpless - or, as he puts it, "sweating blood. " The night will have been 10 years and $2.5 billion in the making, incorporating the work of 5,000 people in 37 states. And then, 154 million miles from home, the fate of the most ambitious machine humans have sent to another planet will rest on a seven-minute landing sequence so far-fetched it looks like something Wile E. Coyote devised to catch the Road Runner.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Mark K. Matthews, Orlando Sentinel
WASHINGTON - There's no firm date yet, but sometime in early 2014, NASA intends to take its first major step toward rebuilding its human spaceflight program. The milestone is the maiden test flight of its Orion spacecraft, a launch that has come into sharper relief in the three months since NASA and manufacturer Lockheed Martin announced it. As planned, an unmanned Orion capsule will begin its journey at Cape Canaveral and take two loops around Earth before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A Soyuz spacecraft carrying a Russian, an American, and a Dutchman to the International Space Station blasted off flawlessly from Russia's launch facility in Kazakhstan on Wednesday. Mission commander Oleg Kononenko and his colleagues, American Don Pettit and European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, are to dock with the space station on Friday. The blastoff from the snowy launchpad in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, took place without a hitch and the spacecraft reached Earth orbit about nine minutes later.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A private California company will attempt the first commercial cargo run to the International Space Station in February. NASA announced the news Friday, a year and a day after Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, became the first private business to launch a capsule into orbit and return it safely to Earth. On Feb. 7, SpaceX will attempt another orbital flight from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The unmanned Dragon capsule will fly to the space station and dock with a load of supplies.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW - A Russian spacecraft on its way to Mars with 12 tons of toxic fuel is stuck circling the wrong planet: ours. And it could come crashing back to Earth in a couple of weeks if engineers can't coax it back on track. Space experts were hopeful yesterday that the space probe's silent engines can be fired to send it off to Mars. If not, it will plummet to Earth. But most U.S. space debris experts think that the fuel on board would explode harmlessly in the upper atmosphere and never reach the ground.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The NASA spacecraft Juno, en route to an unprecedented exploration of Jupiter and the origins of the solar system, lifted off Friday from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Juno launched aboard an Atlas 5 rocket at 12:25 p.m. into clear skies. The craft soared over the Atlantic then conducted two "burns" to set it on the right trajectory for a five-year, 1.7 billion-mile trip to Jupiter. "Today, with the launch of the Juno spacecraft, NASA began a journey to yet another new frontier," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Frank D. Roylance, BALTIMORE SUN
BALTIMORE - With a 30-minute blast from its main rocket engine, NASA's Messenger spacecraft slipped into orbit around the planet Mercury on Thursday evening, becoming the first craft from Earth ever to circle the closest planet to the sun. About 9:15 p.m., when early telemetry indicated the rocket burn had finished and the probe had been captured by Mercury's gravity, a round of applause went up from the mission control room at the Johns Hopkins University's...
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