FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A commercial craft carrying a ton of supplies for the International Space Station ran into thruster trouble shortly after liftoff Friday. Flight controllers managed to gain control, but were forced to delay its arrival at the orbiting lab. The earliest the Dragon capsule could show up is Sunday, a day late, said top officials for NASA and the private company SpaceX. "We're definitely not going to rush it," said SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk. "We want to make sure first and foremost that things are safe before proceeding.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An unmanned space capsule carrying medical samples from the International Space Station splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, completing the first official private interstellar shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA. The California-based SpaceX company gently guided the Dragon into the water via parachutes at 12:22 p.m., a couple of hundred miles off the Baja California coast. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station used a giant robot arm to release the commercial cargo ship 255 miles up. SpaceX provided updates of the journey home via Twitter, including a video of the Dragon separating from the space station.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The first commercial cargo run to the International Space Station is off until spring. SpaceX had planned to launch its unmanned supply ship from Cape Canaveral on Feb. 7. But the company said more testing was needed with the spacecraft, named Dragon. And on Friday, officials confirmed the launch would not occur until late March. Space station commander Daniel Burbank said that as much as he would like to take part in the historic event, it's important that SpaceX fly when it's ready.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Now that NASA has mothballed its fleet of space shuttles, the space agency needs a new ride to the International Space Station. On Friday, NASA handed out $1.1 billion in contracts to three companies to privately develop rockets and spacecraft for what could be the next step in manned spaceflight. The announcement was made by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on a cloudless day from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The winners included Hawthorne, Calif.-based rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, and Boeing Co., which develops spacecraft in Huntington Beach, Calif., and uses rocket engines made by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A commercial cargo ship rocketed into orbit Sunday bound for the International Space Station, the first of a dozen supply runs under a mega-contract with NASA. It was the second launch of a Dragon capsule to the orbiting lab undertaken by the California company SpaceX. The first was in the spring. This time was no test flight, however, and the spacecraft carried 1,000 pounds of key science experiments and other precious gear. There was also a personal touch: chocolate-vanilla swirl ice cream tucked in a freezer for the three station residents.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The space station astronauts floated into the Dragon on Saturday, a day after its heralded arrival as the world's first commercial supply ship. NASA astronaut Donald Pettit, first inside the docked capsule, said the Dragon looked as if it carried about as much cargo as his pickup truck back home in Houston. It has the smell of a brand-new car, he added. "I spent quite a bit of time poking around in here this morning, just looking at the engineering and the layout, and I'm very pleased," Pettit said from the brilliant white compartment.
NEWS
January 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES - After successfully delivering a U.S.-European ocean-monitoring satellite into orbit, a Space X rocket made a hard landing on a floating barge in the roiling Pacific, breaking a support leg and toppling over. SpaceX announcers said the first stage of the Falcon 9 was not upright after reaching the 300-by-170 foot landing pad in choppy seas about 200 miles west of San Diego. The failed landing was a setback for the Hawthorne, Calif., company's plan to reduce launch costs by reusing rockets rather than having them fall into the ocean.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
In a cavernous concrete University City lab, about 80 Drexel University engineering students are working out the kinks on the future of public transportation. They're building a working model of a hyperloop pod. Championed by inventor Elon Musk, the guy behind Tesla electric cars, the hyperloop would move pods full of passengers, powered either electrically or magnetically, through depressurized tubes at up to 750 mph. A hyperloop pod would make the trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco, for example, in about a half-hour between downtown stations.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
Rig owner to give bonuses to charity CHICAGO - Transocean Ltd., owner of the drilling rig that exploded and sank last year in the Gulf of Mexico, said top executives would donate to charity safety bonuses that drew criticism from Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. The bonuses, totaling more than $250,000, will be given to the Deepwater Horizon Memorial Fund established by the Switzerland-based company after 11 rig workers died in the April 20 disaster, it said. CEO Steven Newman and his senior management team drew criticism from Salazar and other government officials after a regulatory filing said the bonuses were justified by Transocean's "best year in safety performance.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
In a cavernous concrete University City lab, about 80 Drexel University engineering students are working out the kinks on the future of public transportation. They're building a working model of a hyperloop pod. Championed by inventor Elon Musk, the guy behind Tesla electric cars, the hyperloop would move pods full of passengers, powered either electrically or magnetically, through depressurized tubes at up to 750 mph. A hyperloop pod would make the trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco, for example, in about a half-hour between downtown stations.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
NEW YORK Man slashed on subway platform Police say a man was slashed in the face in the sixth such attack in the New York subway and on streets this year. The 27-year-old victim was assaulted Sunday morning in a Harlem station. He was waiting for a No. 2 train just after 3 a.m. while arguing with a woman on the platform. Police say that after she asked another man for help, he slashed the victim and fled. Last Monday, a 71-year-old woman was slashed on a train pulling into Manhattan's Broadway-Lafayette station.
NEWS
January 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES - After successfully delivering a U.S.-European ocean-monitoring satellite into orbit, a Space X rocket made a hard landing on a floating barge in the roiling Pacific, breaking a support leg and toppling over. SpaceX announcers said the first stage of the Falcon 9 was not upright after reaching the 300-by-170 foot landing pad in choppy seas about 200 miles west of San Diego. The failed landing was a setback for the Hawthorne, Calif., company's plan to reduce launch costs by reusing rockets rather than having them fall into the ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Swanson's daydreams are not like other people's daydreams. His involve eight months in a cramped rocket hurtling through space, to a hostile planet where he'll survive by farming insects, algae and potatoes - the joys of a one-way trip to Mars. Swanson, a doctoral student at Princeton University, and Theresa Tauscher, a retail banker living in Doylestown, are two of 663 from around the world who will find out Monday whether they're in the running to become the first earthlings to emigrate as part of a speculative plan to colonize the red planet.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A commercial craft carrying a ton of supplies for the International Space Station ran into thruster trouble shortly after liftoff Friday. Flight controllers managed to gain control, but were forced to delay its arrival at the orbiting lab. The earliest the Dragon capsule could show up is Sunday, a day late, said top officials for NASA and the private company SpaceX. "We're definitely not going to rush it," said SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk. "We want to make sure first and foremost that things are safe before proceeding.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An unmanned space capsule carrying medical samples from the International Space Station splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, completing the first official private interstellar shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA. The California-based SpaceX company gently guided the Dragon into the water via parachutes at 12:22 p.m., a couple of hundred miles off the Baja California coast. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station used a giant robot arm to release the commercial cargo ship 255 miles up. SpaceX provided updates of the journey home via Twitter, including a video of the Dragon separating from the space station.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A commercial cargo ship rocketed into orbit Sunday bound for the International Space Station, the first of a dozen supply runs under a mega-contract with NASA. It was the second launch of a Dragon capsule to the orbiting lab undertaken by the California company SpaceX. The first was in the spring. This time was no test flight, however, and the spacecraft carried 1,000 pounds of key science experiments and other precious gear. There was also a personal touch: chocolate-vanilla swirl ice cream tucked in a freezer for the three station residents.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Rumors of NASA's death have been exaggerated. After the Obama administration proceeded with the scuttling of the ancient space-shuttle fleet, a host of doom-and-gloomers, including some of the most storied names in U.S. astronaut history, raised sand. They suggested that without manned flight, there really was no U.S. space program. But that was B.C. - before Curiosity, the probe sent to Mars, which for more than a week now has been beaming photographs of the Red Planet's landscape back to Earth.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Now that NASA has mothballed its fleet of space shuttles, the space agency needs a new ride to the International Space Station. On Friday, NASA handed out $1.1 billion in contracts to three companies to privately develop rockets and spacecraft for what could be the next step in manned spaceflight. The announcement was made by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on a cloudless day from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The winners included Hawthorne, Calif.-based rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, and Boeing Co., which develops spacecraft in Huntington Beach, Calif., and uses rocket engines made by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif.
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