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Spaghetti

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NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Robin A. Larsen, Special to The Inquirer
While 7-year-old Julie Bailey watched, her brother Chris, 12, loaded weight after weight on a scale hanging from a bridge of spaghetti and glue that she and her father had built for a bridge-building contest at Chews Elementary School, where she is a second grader. The bridge, a model railroad trestle about 16 inches long, spanned two tables. When the weight reached reached nine pounds, the bridge creaked into a 'U' shape, but did not break. Parents and children in the gymnasium cheered as the judge, Principal James Palmer, shook his head.
LIVING
May 21, 1993 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I'm in first grade and I like to write sentences. " Dwayne, 6, is sitting at a table as he speaks, drawing a train with red magic marker. "Philadelphia starts with a P," he says, "and I like to color, too. See - here's the dirt and oil in the carts behind the train. The dirt's for flowers. " It's a well-drawn picture, with smoke from the stack, wheels, rails, a tunnel, and even a window for the engineer. Dwayne is progressing at an age- appropriate level in school and has an average IQ. He's slight, with an elfin face, sunny smile and happy disposition, despite the neglect and deprivation in his background.
NEWS
February 28, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Glazer, 88, a folk singer who was best known for his hit children's song "On Top of Spaghetti," died of complications from a stroke last Friday at St. John's Home in Rochester, N.Y. Mr. Glazer, who grew up in South Philadelphia but spent most of his adult life in the New York area, suffered a stroke in December en route from his home in Chestnut Hill to his son John's home in Rochester. A member of a generation of troubadours who popularized protest songs, Mr. Glazer recorded an album, Songs of the Spanish Civil War, with Pete Seeger in 1943 and later recorded Songs of Peace, Freedom and Protest on his own. He was a prolific songwriter for others, including Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and Bob Dylan, who recorded the ballad "Talking Inflation Blues" in 1960.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | By Regina Medina, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let the spaghetti-sauce wars begin. The combatants are Van den Bergh Foods Co., of Chicago, and Camden's Campbell Soup Co., which make rival spaghetti sauces. Van den Bergh has sued Campbell over a series of TV commercials that the Chicago company says mislead consumers about the consistency of its product. Van den Bergh, maker of Ragu sauces, wants to stop the commercials and is seeking unspecified damages from Campbell, which makes Prego sauces. The suit was filed on June 23 in federal court in New York.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
This is a column about food. Because I'm on a diet. Since I can't have food, it's all I think about. I've been working a lot, and as you may know, I keep the TV on in my office when I work. And everything on TV is about food. In other words, it's TV's fault I gained a permanent 10 pounds. Half the shows on TV are cooking shows, and I watch every one of them. Rachael Ray, Anthony Bourdain, Martha Stewart, Lidia Bastianich, Mike Colameco, Ina Garten, and Nigella Lawson.
FOOD
April 22, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Who says spaghetti sauce has to be Italian? For that matter, who says it has to be fattening? If pasta is your passion but you'd welcome a change from oregano and tomato paste, today we share some other ideas for saucing spaghetti. Like all our Slim Gourmet recipes, these are low in fat and calories. Our first is a Blanquette de Veau Sauce, a creamy white sauce made with veal and white wine: BLANQUETTE DE VEAU SAUCE FOR SPAGHETTI 1 pound lean, fat-trimmed veal, ground 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 small onion, minced optional: 1 clove garlic, minced optional: pinch each, dried: basil and thyme 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg salt, pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1/4 cup cold water 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley Spray a large non-stick skillet with cooking spray.
FOOD
December 29, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Spaghetti is so popular it's almost our national comfort food. But when Italians really need soothing, they skip the tomato sauce and go for "al bianco" or "white" food with a sauce like this lemon-scented meat ragu. It comes from Good Cooking: the New Basics by Jill Dupleix (Silverback; $20). Australian-born Dupleix is a food columnist for the London Times and author of 12 cookbooks, this latest available here in softcover. Her quick and easy modern take on traditional foods echoes her belief that a happy cook and good ingredients make the best meals.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Guernsey Le Pelley
Up until a few years ago I thought I was a perfectly normal eater and most everyone else ate funny. My wife - who is also a funny eater - assures me this is not so. People, over a period of time, get into a gastronomic rut, and to have this pointed out invites either indignation or indigestion. Or both. A lot of people put ketchup on French fried potatoes, but a one-time friend of mine put ketchup on mashed potatoes. That is weird by anyone's standards. In my case, I always suck the pimento out of stuffed green olives before I eat them.
FOOD
April 24, 1991 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
Bistro food - unpretenious, simple and good tasting - is winning converts in America. For years, this casual, wholesome fare has been Europe's answer to American fast food. Now this easy-to-make food is exactly the thing for contemporary American tastes. The hallmark of bistro cuisine is straightforward combinations of ordinary ingredients that don't take up a lot of precious time in preparing. Fortunately, many convenience foods that we rely on can find a place in bistro-style dishes.
FOOD
March 18, 1987 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Spaghetti is a natural convenience food. Made of nothing but flour and water, it can be stored at room temperature for years and be freshly cooked just minutes later. Spaghetti sauces, though, are usually a different story. Most of them call for long lists of ingredients and hours of simmering. Jarred and canned varieties cut preparation time, but many of them are loaded with salt, sugar and preservatives, making them undesirable for many consumers. The good news is that there are scores of spaghetti sauces that can be made in minutes from a few artfully combined ingredients.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
This is a column about food. Because I'm on a diet. Since I can't have food, it's all I think about. I've been working a lot, and as you may know, I keep the TV on in my office when I work. And everything on TV is about food. In other words, it's TV's fault I gained a permanent 10 pounds. Half the shows on TV are cooking shows, and I watch every one of them. Rachael Ray, Anthony Bourdain, Martha Stewart, Lidia Bastianich, Mike Colameco, Ina Garten, and Nigella Lawson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 whole egg 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese or part pecorino and part Parmesan ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon salt 4 ounces spaghetti 2 teaspoons unsalted butter (or use salted butter and less salt) 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces pancetta cut into ¼-inch-thick slices (substitute 4 strips crumbled bacon or 4 tablespoons bacon bits)   1. In a large bowl, whisk together egg, cheese, and pepper. Keep bowl near stove.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
ROME - They twirled, they sniffed, they slurped, they chewed. The dozen homemakers who gathered at a Rome hotel on a recent afternoon took their work terribly seriously, rating plates of pasta for chewiness, saltiness, gumminess, or done-ness - that perfect balance known as al dente, or firm to the bite. Pasta is serious business in Italy, and the recent blind taste test by the world's biggest pasta-maker drove home that an awful lot of thought goes into making the simple combination of durum wheat semolina and water from which Italy's national dish is made.
FOOD
March 22, 2012 | By Susan M. Selasky, Detroit Free Press
This variation on the traditional pasta carbonara dish used crispy salami instead of pancetta or bacon as a topper. I added asparagus to the recipe as an ode to to spring.   Spaghetti Carbonara With Asparagus and Crispy Salami Makes 4 servings 2 large eggs 3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese (plus more for serving) 1/4 cup half-and-half 3/4 pound dry spaghetti 1/2 pound trimmed asparagus, cut into 2-inch pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 pound salami, cut into 1/4-inch-wide strips 3 cloves garlic, peeled, chopped 1/4 cup white wine Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1/2 cup chopped parsley for garnish 1. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs, Parmesan cheese, and half-and-half.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
It was the summer of our discontent. Where to begin? An earthquake, a hurricane, and a visit from Mother Mary. A disaster trifecta. The perfect storm of catastrophes. The Manny, Moe, and Jack of nightmares. Just kidding. She was here for two months, and now that she's gone back to Miami, I miss her. When I feel sad, I turn on Everybody Loves Raymond , really really REALLY LOUD. And then I don't miss her anymore. She came up because a sewer main broke under her house, necessitating all manner of repair work, and I figured it would be best if she wasn't there to tell the workmen they were working too hard or they were really cute.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The coolest thing about Union Transfer, the Spring Garden Street music venue set to open Sept. 21 with a show by Philadelphia indie-rock band Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, might be that the club will actually be cool. That's cool as in temperature. The club, booked by Sean Agnew of R5 Productions in partnership with New York promoter Bowery Presents, will be the polar opposite of the three-digit thermometer readings frequently registered at the First Unitarian Church, the wood-paneled sweatbox that's the centerpiece of Agnew's indie empire.
FOOD
June 30, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ah, the Fourth: burgers on the grill, fresh-squeezed lemonade, creamy potato salad, the first corn of the season, and . . . Crabs and spaghetti? If you are a member of the Campanaro family, that's what you smell in your Fourth of July dreams. "It's one of those things you long for, you know?" said Lou Campanaro, chef and co-owner of Village Belle, the Italian-leaning Front Street restaurant. As a chef, and member of a family who love to eat and cook (and compete; just ask them about their family meatball contest)
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For such a harmless-looking character, she engenders strong feelings: revered and reviled as a picture of womanhood. But now the commercial powerhouse that is Cathy, the starring schlub of a 34-year-old comic strip, will retire so her creator can obsess over another character dear to her heart - her daughter. "I want the chance to be a completely devoted, overbearing, overpowering mom for one year," said Cathy Guisewite, 60, from her home in Los Angeles, noting that her daughter just became a high school senior.
NEWS
September 18, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Frederick Roth Jr., 81, of Bryn Athyn, a retired librarian and a Korean War veteran, died of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis on Wednesday, Sept. 15, at his home. From 1994 until retiring in 2004, Mr. Roth was librarian at the Swedenborg Library at the Academy of the New Church in Bryn Athyn. He was an active member of the General Church of the New Jerusalem, which follows the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg, an 18th-century Swedish scientist, mystic, and philosopher.
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