CollectionsSpanish Music
IN THE NEWS

Spanish Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Art songs and folk songs have never moved very far from each other in the Spanish tradition. The theater music - zarzuelas and opera - builds on the same forms and family of rhythms, and songs of one century rejoice in their close ties with the songs of the last. Repertorio Espanol, the theater company based in New York City, offered examples from both fields in a recital yesterday at Old Pine Street Church. Pianist Pablo Zinger, the music director of the company, and singers Brenda Feliciano and Thelma Ithier-Sterling performed songs from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico and Spain in a program sponsored by the Latin American Guild for the Arts.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
It is simplistic to argue that musicians should play music only from their natural habitat, but when Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducts Spanish music, he strikes a chord that cannot be mistaken with musicians and listeners. Conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mann Music Center last night, Fruhbeck brought back Falla's short opera, La Vida Breve, and created, in the formal arrangement of the orchestral stage, a fervent and compelling theatrical evening. The impetuosity of the music and Fruhbeck's sure grasp of the means of ensuring its freshness combined to make this the high point of the first half of the orchestra's season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Radio listeners expecting to hear salsa and merengue on Spanish-language WTEL-AM (860) got a bigger jolt than what normally comes with their Cafe Bustelo yesterday. The station is now airing talk programming. En ingles. Beasley Broadcasting, which owns four stations in the market, including WWDB-FM (96.5), changed WTEL's format to all-talk and renamed it WWDB-AM. The move left a dozen WTEL staffers in limbo, said Jorge Antonely, WTEL program director. At 7 a.m., WWDB program director Jim Casale and general manager Dan Sullivan announced the changes, effective immediately.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Five hundred years later, anyone eager to discover the old world of Spanish music has to turn to Columbus - or rather to the explorer's son, Ferdinand. He had in his library a collection of 15th-century Spanish music fundamental to knowing what Columbus' contemporaries sang and strummed for dancing. From that collection, and another found in the 19th century, the Renaissance Wind Band fashioned its own Columbian exposition for three weekend concerts, including one Saturday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
When the dust has settled, it will be apparent that Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos has been a leader in bringing unusual music in general and Spanish opera in particular to Philadelphia audiences. The 53-year-old Spanish conductor continues his tradition today, tomorrow and Tuesday when he leads the Philadelphia Orchestra in the local premiere of Falla's El Retablo de Maese Pedro, a short opera (with puppets) based on an episode from Don Quixote. In his seasons as a guest conductor here, Fruhbeck has plumbed Spanish opera and ballet, and led works by Turina, Granados and others that stressed aspects of the Spanish mien.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
Jason Vieaux might have chosen some better music for his Sunday recital, but the sound of his guitar was almost always engaging, especially in moments of extreme softness. And during Spanish and Latin American pieces, his strumming and nimble finger work evoked images of feverish dancing. Vieaux, silver medalist in this year's Walter W. Naumburg International Guitar Competition in New York, made his Philadelphia-area debut in a one-day-only performance presented by Astral Artistic Services at Beth Zion Beth Israel Temple in Center City.
LIVING
February 16, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Juan, 9, is asked if he likes school, he says two words - "I'm good. " What he's good at is drawing. Never mind what the lesson is - he's drawing Spider Man, a smiling face with glasses, and buildings. The teacher was concerned when he started drawing teary-eyed clowns. Then she heard that clown pictures hung in his bedroom and he liked them a lot. At church Juan loves to attend Sunday school. He especially likes decorating pictures of Jesus, and says, "Jesus is God's son. He loves me. " Juan entered foster care with severe neglect in his background, and it took a long time for him to joyfully realize there'd be food whenever he was hungry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
These are days for lovers of the keyboard. Three pianists whose artistry I respect are scheduled to play in Philadelphia. Unfortunately, it may be difficult to hear Gloria Whitney, the Eaken Trio's keyboardist, because the group's recital Sunday evening at the Laurel Hill mansion in Fairmount Park is nearly sold out. The Eaken is playing two of Haydn's delectable piano trios as well as music by Kodaly. Two distinguished pianists are Philadelphia Orchestra guests this week at the Mann Music Center, beginning Monday with Horacio Gutierrez.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
Perhaps it was the dinner-hour thunderstorm that rumbled through Philadelphia yesterday evening. Perhaps it was a surfeit of Mozart (et al.) on the Square. Whatever the reason, attendance was very sparse for last night's concert by the Lehigh String Quartet at the Church of the Holy Trinity. As noted in an earlier review, emptiness overresonates in this church, and the young quartet had to make themselves understood through an acoustical fog - which they had the intelligence and understanding to do. Programs for the Mozart on the Square Festival tend to be militantly conventional, and within that context, yesterday's assortment of works provided something out of the ordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Eliot Fisk has been paying the rent. Wending his way across Europe, a solo guitarist with orchestra after orchestra, he plays Joaquin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, a great work that has all but wiped out of existence the other concertos in the repertoire. Paying the rent, he explained, because he plays the concerto for money but other contemporary works for love. Philadelphia audiences will hear some of the love side Saturday, when he celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Classical Guitar Society with a recital at Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 2012
SO, I'M NOT going to lie, Philly. You got me feeling a little like Michael Corleone over here. Just when I thought I was done with journalism, you dragged me back in. OK, I dragged myself back. But you gave me no choice. When I moved from Connecticut to Philadelphia a year ago because of my husband's job, I left a nearly two-decade career at the Hartford Courant , more than half of that as a columnist. It was - on most days - the best job in the world. But a new city calls for a new adventure, right?
NEWS
January 26, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Maybe it's fatuous to think of Spanish repertoire as warm-weather music (Madrid temps can dip to 25 degrees this time of year), but the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia's sunny program of Joaquin Turina, Joaquin Rodrigo, and Bizet couldn't have been more welcome Monday, particularly as conducted by Andrew Grams. He knows how to polish music without airbrushing it into inconsequentiality. On paper, the program promised charm over substance. Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez is full of inviting tunes and folksy atmosphere, while Bizet's Symphony No. 1 is full of engaging melodies but is still the work of the 17-year-old future composer of Carmen . The most substantial piece was the least known, Turina's La Oracion de Torero ( The Bullfighter's Prayer )
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Juana Molina creates fluid, constantly shifting songs. They blend singer-songwriterly acoustic guitars, understated, beguiling vocals, and circular, looplike patterns. On Son, however, the Argentinian's entrancing fourth album, nothing sounds fixed or static. "La Verdad" and "Un Beso Llega" begin with Molina singing structured melodies before the vocals evolve into nearly wordless fantasias, as if the songs remix themselves. "I was told that to be a songwriter, you had to write with this A part, this B part, and C part, these prestructured things, [but]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1999 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So you decided not to take the Concorde to Paris to celebrate the new year. You're not taking one of those expensive cruises to the Caribbean, either. You thought better of spending the evening downing drinks and trying to have fun while thinking of the bill at some exorbitantly costly restaurant. It just didn't seem like such a fun idea to hire a baby-sitter for enough to pay for her first semester at college. Lots of people have decided that to greet 2000 they'd like to be with family and to wake up Saturday with a clear head.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Radio listeners expecting to hear salsa and merengue on Spanish-language WTEL-AM (860) got a bigger jolt than what normally comes with their Cafe Bustelo yesterday. The station is now airing talk programming. En ingles. Beasley Broadcasting, which owns four stations in the market, including WWDB-FM (96.5), changed WTEL's format to all-talk and renamed it WWDB-AM. The move left a dozen WTEL staffers in limbo, said Jorge Antonely, WTEL program director. At 7 a.m., WWDB program director Jim Casale and general manager Dan Sullivan announced the changes, effective immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Eliot Fisk has been paying the rent. Wending his way across Europe, a solo guitarist with orchestra after orchestra, he plays Joaquin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, a great work that has all but wiped out of existence the other concertos in the repertoire. Paying the rent, he explained, because he plays the concerto for money but other contemporary works for love. Philadelphia audiences will hear some of the love side Saturday, when he celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Classical Guitar Society with a recital at Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
Jason Vieaux might have chosen some better music for his Sunday recital, but the sound of his guitar was almost always engaging, especially in moments of extreme softness. And during Spanish and Latin American pieces, his strumming and nimble finger work evoked images of feverish dancing. Vieaux, silver medalist in this year's Walter W. Naumburg International Guitar Competition in New York, made his Philadelphia-area debut in a one-day-only performance presented by Astral Artistic Services at Beth Zion Beth Israel Temple in Center City.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The men of Ballet Folklorico Kuikaltiani from Puebla, Mexico, clasped machetes firmly in their hands, awaiting a chance to show off the folk dances of their country. When music for "El Jarabe Nayarita" began, they started clanging machetes together. Soon the seven men, dressed in outfits worn by workers in Nayarit's sugar cane industry, were clanging the sharpened blades around their thighs and behind their backs while stomping and jumping from a squatting position. "I am so proud of this, because this is a very good presentation of the culture of my country," said Carlos Villalt, a representative of the Mexican consulate in Philadelphia, who attended Monday night's hour-long program of traditional dances from the Mexican states of Guerrero, Veracruz, Chihuahua and Jalisco.
LIVING
February 16, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Juan, 9, is asked if he likes school, he says two words - "I'm good. " What he's good at is drawing. Never mind what the lesson is - he's drawing Spider Man, a smiling face with glasses, and buildings. The teacher was concerned when he started drawing teary-eyed clowns. Then she heard that clown pictures hung in his bedroom and he liked them a lot. At church Juan loves to attend Sunday school. He especially likes decorating pictures of Jesus, and says, "Jesus is God's son. He loves me. " Juan entered foster care with severe neglect in his background, and it took a long time for him to joyfully realize there'd be food whenever he was hungry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
These are days for lovers of the keyboard. Three pianists whose artistry I respect are scheduled to play in Philadelphia. Unfortunately, it may be difficult to hear Gloria Whitney, the Eaken Trio's keyboardist, because the group's recital Sunday evening at the Laurel Hill mansion in Fairmount Park is nearly sold out. The Eaken is playing two of Haydn's delectable piano trios as well as music by Kodaly. Two distinguished pianists are Philadelphia Orchestra guests this week at the Mann Music Center, beginning Monday with Horacio Gutierrez.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|