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Special Education

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NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Lem Lloyd, Special to The Inquirer
With little more than four weeks until the start of the new school year, Chester County educators are trying to figure out the state of special- education programs affecting about 5,500 children across the county. On Wednesday, superintendents and their representatives from the county's 12 school districts met with officials from the county's Intermediate Unit to learn what the IU would charge to continue running special-education programs. The meeting was closed to the public and the media, but afterward, several of the superintendents said they were finding it difficult to make decisions so long as the state budget process remained deadlocked.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
When Lavelle Patterson and Kenneth Blake joined a picket line set up by members and supporters of Chester's Concerned Citizens for Educational Renewal last week, each said he had a personal reason for protesting the treatment of special-education students in the Chester-Upland School District. "I was in special-education classes from third to 11th grade, and I shouldn't have been there. I am concerned that there are other students in special ed that don't belong there," said Patterson, who added that after getting out of special-education classes, he ended up graduating in June from Chester High School with honor-roll grades.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
All last year, parents of special-education students attended Gloucester City Board of Education meetings and complained that their children were not making progress in reading and writing and that the school district was failing to meet their needs. Their persistent complaints have brought state monitoring and a 10-point corrective-action plan to the special-education programs run by the Gloucester City schools. The district had, until now, consolidated its special-education classes at a single school.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
After a yearlong study, a committee has recommended that the Wallingford- Swarthmore school board increase staffing for the district's special- education classes. The Community Curriculum Committee for Special Education, which was appointed by the school board, made its report at a board planning session Tuesday night. The committee, composed of teachers, parents and residents, studied throughout 1986 how special education is carried out in the district. Members observed special-education classes, met with special-education teachers, and conducted a survey of teachers, parents and students in grades 5-12.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Lem Lloyd, Special to The Inquirer
When it comes to providing special education to their students, three Chester County school districts have said they can do it cheaper and more efficiently on their own. And so, last night, the countywide Intermediate Unit - the public agency that has been providing special education for years - cut its operating staff by more than 10 percent, furloughing 34 employees. The IU teachers, speech therapists and instructional aides being furloughed work in the Avon Grove, Kennett and Unionville/Chadds Ford School Districts - the three districts that have chosen to run most of their programs themselves.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Nancy Caprara, Special to The Inquirer
The Kennett Consolidated School District has joined other Pennsylvania school districts and educational organizations in a lawsuit filed in Commonwealth Court seeking to force the state to pay its share of special- education costs this school year. By law, the state is required to pay a portion of expenses for special- education programs. "When you're trying to encourage someone to play by the rules, you have to let them know when you're concerned, you have to get their attention," said Superintendent Larry Bosley.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
A week after a community committee recommended increased staffing for special education in the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, a parent has assailed the program as a failure. "Our school district program fails the test for a number of reasons," Joseph Rizzello told school board members at Monday's business meeting. Rizzello said teachers assigned to areas other than special education did not fully accept learning-disabled students and did not completely understand the type of education those students needed.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
An expected $1 million gap in state funding for county special-education programs may force the Chester County Intermediate Unit to make significant cuts in teachers and classes serving more than 5,200 students, according to school officials. News of the funding shortfall has left parents, teachers and advocates of handicapped and disabled children worried over which programs and services may be eliminated or curtailed. Those issues will likely be decided on Tuesday, when the Intermediate Unit board meets at its new offices in the Oaklands Corporate Center at 8 p.m. The Intermediate Unit moved to the new offices in Exton off U.S. Route 30 last week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Tom Wolf is governor of Pennsylvania During the 2016-17 budget season, we accomplished three important priorities that I believe are critical to moving Pennsylvania forward. Working with the legislature, I secured increased funding for our schools and resources to battle the commonwealth's opioid epidemic, and greatly reduced our deficit. Funding our schools has always been a top priority for me. In this budget, I was able to secure an additional $200 million in basic education funding, as well as a $30 million increase for early-childhood education; a $20 million increase for special education and a $10 million increase for early intervention; and a nearly $40 million increase for higher education.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Paul B. Winkler, 79, of Lawrenceville, N.J., the groundbreaking executive director of the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education from 1975 to May of this year, died of cancer on Tuesday, July 12, at his home. In March 1994, the New Jersey Senate adopted "an act regarding genocide education in the public schools. " It stated that "every board of education shall include instruction on the Holocaust and genocide in an appropriate place in the curriculum of all elementary and secondary school pupils.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - With hours to spare before the start of the new fiscal year, the Republican-controlled legislature gave its final sign-off to a $31.5 billion spending plan that Gov. Wolf said he could support. That was the good news for those aiming for an on-time budget. The bad news for all sides is that there is no agreement on how to pay for the plan, which calls for increasing funding for public schools, early childhood and special education, and state colleges and universities.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Ryan Morehart thought he had found a field that was both valuable and enjoyable: child care. But as he advanced, he realized there wasn't much advancing to do. He considered going back to school, but that didn't promise enough financial benefit. "I love working with kids," said Morehart, 29, of Philadelphia. But after nine years in early childhood education, he switched to office management. "My benefits are a lot better, the pay is a lot better, I have money left over to the point where we could do stuff," he said.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
William G. Goldschmidt Jr., 68, of Drexel Hill, a leader and teacher in special education, died Thursday, May 19, of cancer at home. Mr. Goldschmidt created and implemented programs for special-education students at schools in the Philadelphia suburbs. Wherever he worked, he hired a team of teachers and infused in them his fervor and zest for education, his family said in a tribute. "He kept in close contact as friends with many of them throughout the years," his family said. "He was not just a supervisor, he was a true leader.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When John Casavecchia and Dr. Russell Harris bought the historic Oaks Cloister in Germantown in 2002, Dr. Harris said, "it had been abandoned for over 10 years. " The house, off Wissahickon Avenue near Lincoln Drive, was designed and built by Joseph M. Huston (1866-1940), the architect of the Pennsylvania Capitol in Harrisburg, Harris said. As Mr. Casavecchia and Harris, his life partner, restored the property, it earned several awards, including one from what is now the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia in 2007.
NEWS
February 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
$33.3B Total spending proposed for the 2016-17 fiscal year. $2.7B Amount that would be generated by new or increased taxes. $217M Revenue that would be generated from a tax on natural gas drilling. $200M New funding for public schools. $60M New spending sought for early childhood education. $50M Funding increase proposed for special education. $10.15 Proposal for Pennsylvania minimum wage. Note: Figures based on passage of current budget proposal.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to the way charter schools are paid for teaching children in special-education classes, critics say Pennsylvania has been flunking basic math for years - and unfairly subtracting hundreds of millions of dollars from taxpayers' wallets. Last week, the Wolf administration took the first step in a case observers say could bring the issue to a head - a bid to block $24.7 million in charter payouts in the cash-strapped Chester Upland School District. Public school advocates say large charter school payouts are the result of faulty calculations that lawmakers and state officials have had a hard time erasing.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LAVERNE CASE didn't want to hear that children with special needs couldn't make it in society. As a special-education teacher in Philadelphia for more than 35 years, LaVerne saw it as her role in life to help those children go on to normal, productive lives. "She didn't believe that those children couldn't lead regular lives," said her nephew, Jeff Hill. "She had a special way with those children. " LaVerne Pauline Case, a woman noted for doing things her way; funny, compassionate, a devoted churchwoman who lent her voice to the choirs and composed songs for her beloved sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha; and a devoted aunt, died of heart failure on June 25. She was 77 and lived at Wesley Enhanced Living at Stapeley in Germantown.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS all about the kids. Bruce Burgess was dedicated to educating students with special needs. He spent much of his career with the Philadelphia School District as an administrator in charge of the special-education programs in dozens of schools, from kindergarten to high school. But his first love was teaching. "He was an outstanding teacher," said former colleague Anne Barnosky, a retired teacher and administrator. "He always wanted to make sure the kids got what they needed.
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