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Special Education

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NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Lem Lloyd, Special to The Inquirer
With little more than four weeks until the start of the new school year, Chester County educators are trying to figure out the state of special- education programs affecting about 5,500 children across the county. On Wednesday, superintendents and their representatives from the county's 12 school districts met with officials from the county's Intermediate Unit to learn what the IU would charge to continue running special-education programs. The meeting was closed to the public and the media, but afterward, several of the superintendents said they were finding it difficult to make decisions so long as the state budget process remained deadlocked.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
When Lavelle Patterson and Kenneth Blake joined a picket line set up by members and supporters of Chester's Concerned Citizens for Educational Renewal last week, each said he had a personal reason for protesting the treatment of special-education students in the Chester-Upland School District. "I was in special-education classes from third to 11th grade, and I shouldn't have been there. I am concerned that there are other students in special ed that don't belong there," said Patterson, who added that after getting out of special-education classes, he ended up graduating in June from Chester High School with honor-roll grades.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
All last year, parents of special-education students attended Gloucester City Board of Education meetings and complained that their children were not making progress in reading and writing and that the school district was failing to meet their needs. Their persistent complaints have brought state monitoring and a 10-point corrective-action plan to the special-education programs run by the Gloucester City schools. The district had, until now, consolidated its special-education classes at a single school.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
After a yearlong study, a committee has recommended that the Wallingford- Swarthmore school board increase staffing for the district's special- education classes. The Community Curriculum Committee for Special Education, which was appointed by the school board, made its report at a board planning session Tuesday night. The committee, composed of teachers, parents and residents, studied throughout 1986 how special education is carried out in the district. Members observed special-education classes, met with special-education teachers, and conducted a survey of teachers, parents and students in grades 5-12.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Lem Lloyd, Special to The Inquirer
When it comes to providing special education to their students, three Chester County school districts have said they can do it cheaper and more efficiently on their own. And so, last night, the countywide Intermediate Unit - the public agency that has been providing special education for years - cut its operating staff by more than 10 percent, furloughing 34 employees. The IU teachers, speech therapists and instructional aides being furloughed work in the Avon Grove, Kennett and Unionville/Chadds Ford School Districts - the three districts that have chosen to run most of their programs themselves.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Nancy Caprara, Special to The Inquirer
The Kennett Consolidated School District has joined other Pennsylvania school districts and educational organizations in a lawsuit filed in Commonwealth Court seeking to force the state to pay its share of special- education costs this school year. By law, the state is required to pay a portion of expenses for special- education programs. "When you're trying to encourage someone to play by the rules, you have to let them know when you're concerned, you have to get their attention," said Superintendent Larry Bosley.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
A week after a community committee recommended increased staffing for special education in the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, a parent has assailed the program as a failure. "Our school district program fails the test for a number of reasons," Joseph Rizzello told school board members at Monday's business meeting. Rizzello said teachers assigned to areas other than special education did not fully accept learning-disabled students and did not completely understand the type of education those students needed.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
An expected $1 million gap in state funding for county special-education programs may force the Chester County Intermediate Unit to make significant cuts in teachers and classes serving more than 5,200 students, according to school officials. News of the funding shortfall has left parents, teachers and advocates of handicapped and disabled children worried over which programs and services may be eliminated or curtailed. Those issues will likely be decided on Tuesday, when the Intermediate Unit board meets at its new offices in the Oaklands Corporate Center at 8 p.m. The Intermediate Unit moved to the new offices in Exton off U.S. Route 30 last week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to the way charter schools are paid for teaching children in special-education classes, critics say Pennsylvania has been flunking basic math for years - and unfairly subtracting hundreds of millions of dollars from taxpayers' wallets. Last week, the Wolf administration took the first step in a case observers say could bring the issue to a head - a bid to block $24.7 million in charter payouts in the cash-strapped Chester Upland School District. Public school advocates say large charter school payouts are the result of faulty calculations that lawmakers and state officials have had a hard time erasing.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LAVERNE CASE didn't want to hear that children with special needs couldn't make it in society. As a special-education teacher in Philadelphia for more than 35 years, LaVerne saw it as her role in life to help those children go on to normal, productive lives. "She didn't believe that those children couldn't lead regular lives," said her nephew, Jeff Hill. "She had a special way with those children. " LaVerne Pauline Case, a woman noted for doing things her way; funny, compassionate, a devoted churchwoman who lent her voice to the choirs and composed songs for her beloved sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha; and a devoted aunt, died of heart failure on June 25. She was 77 and lived at Wesley Enhanced Living at Stapeley in Germantown.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS all about the kids. Bruce Burgess was dedicated to educating students with special needs. He spent much of his career with the Philadelphia School District as an administrator in charge of the special-education programs in dozens of schools, from kindergarten to high school. But his first love was teaching. "He was an outstanding teacher," said former colleague Anne Barnosky, a retired teacher and administrator. "He always wanted to make sure the kids got what they needed.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. David Wood, 83, of Gloucester City, a former teacher and administrator at schools for disabled children in South Jersey, died of a brain tumor Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Wissahickon Hospice in Bala Cynwyd. Born in Ilford, on the northeast outskirts of London, Mr. Wood immigrated to the United States in his early 20s and became a citizen in the year he turned 50. He earned a bachelor's at Antioch College and in 1983 earned a master's in education at what is now Rowan University. "He was always interested in special education, education for the disabled," son Derek said.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A teacher at KIPP Philadelphia Elementary Academy has won a national teaching award. Dayna Perry was one of 10 teachers nationwide whom the KIPP Foundation honored for excellence in teaching Friday night in Houston during the annual conference of the national charter school network. Winners were selected based on their track records in improving student performance, commitment to helping students succeed, and leadership in the classroom and their schools. Each will receive $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Nine-year-old Israel's range of interests is nearly as wide as his smile. He loves cars, trucks, and for that matter, any moving machinery. His favorite pastimes include playing with Legos, watching action movies and cartoons on TV, wrestling, playing football, singing, listening to jokes and telling them (he has a very good memory). Cheerful and articulate, he is enrolled in special education at school, and benefits from the small class size and individual attention. As a result, he is steadily making academic strides.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Update: Stephanie Amato was released early Thursday after posting 10 percent of bail set at $125,000, according to court records. A special-education teacher in Mayfair has been accused of having a sexual relationship with one of her students, a 14-year-old boy. Stephanie Amato, a teacher at Ethan Allen Elementary, surrendered to authorities in the Special Victims Unit on Wednesday, a police spokeswoman said. After a months-long investigation, Amato, 30, was charged with statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, unlawful contact with a minor, interference with custody of children, endangering the welfare of a child, corruption of a minor, indecent assault and indecent exposure.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew D. Blake, 62, of Moorestown, a special-education teacher for 25 years, died of gastric cancer Monday, Dec. 16, at Samaritan Inpatient Hospice Center at Virtua Memorial in Mount Holly. Born in Teaneck, N.J., Mr. Blake studied special education at what is now Rowan University and soon after graduating started his first job, as a special-education teacher at Twin Hills Elementary School in Willingboro. He stayed in it for all 25 years of his career. "He loved it there - loved the teachers, he loved all the principals he worked for, and got along great with the aides, the parents; and he had generations of kids," said his wife, Norma, who for a decade was state librarian of New Jersey.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Helen Clare Kline, 90, a longtime nun and educator also known as Sister Mary Samuel, and a sister of the late Philadelphia City Councilwoman Joan Krajewski, died Sunday, Dec. 1, at St. Joseph Villa, a retirement community in Flourtown. Helen Kline was born in the Port Richmond section on Dec. 21, 1922, the second of nine children of Samuel and Anna Kline. She attended Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary School and John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls High School. Before becoming a nun, she worked in retail in Philadelphia, said her niece, Maureen Robbins.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO The new dean of Rowan University's College of Education has a mandate: Find a mandate. By the end of the academic year, her goal is to establish a mission for the school as the university increases its research focus and seeks to rise to national prominence. "My question is, for Rowan, what's going to be our stamp on our graduates?" said Monika Shealey, 39, who became Rowan's education dean in July after three years as an associate dean and associate professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Education.
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