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Special Forces

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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - A decade after the United States began two wars that put women at the front lines of unconventional fighting, the Pentagon crept closer Thursday to formally allowing them to serve in combat by announcing an additional 14,000 combat-related jobs for female service members. The changes are intended to acknowledge the role that women play in today's wars and give them more chances to rise up the military ranks. Particularly affected will be the Army, the largest of the services, where the vast majority of combat-related roles are now held by men. Women still won't be allowed to serve in special forces or infantries - the frontline fighting units - leading some advocates and service members to argue that the changes don't go far enough.
SPORTS
July 22, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Responding to a request from Greece, the United States committed 400 American special forces soldiers to help protect the Olympics, a U.S. counterterrorism official said yesterday, as security costs for the games swelled to a record-breaking $1.5 billion. It was not yet decided where the U.S. soldiers would be based: in Athens, on the nearby island of Crete or on alert in Europe, where they are based in Germany. The United States is in the process of discussing with the Greek government where the soldiers will be positioned, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
The question obsessing the U.S. military is how to train Iraqis to take over responsibility for their internal security from U.S. troops. A huge U.S. troop presence in Iraqi cities is abrasive, and is a visible symbol of occupation. Every day one sees scenes like these: A car bomb exploded at 7:10 a.m. yesterday a block from my hotel, shattering windows and killing two street sweepers. Hours later, the workers in the Milky Way ice cream bar and the Jadriyah Hairdresser for men were sweeping up piles of glass and plaster in front of their shops.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
The genie is out of the bottle in the mountain mists above Sarajevo and for those who also serve by only standing and waiting, it's too late to do anything but hope for the best. It is presumed that the besieging Bosnian Serbs aren't on to this yet, but those five United Nations monitors who met with their commander on Mount Bjeslasnica yesterday weren't the only newcomers on the heights. According to European intelligence sources, U.S. Special Forces teams with portable laser target designators, or LTDs, have also slipped into secret mountain positions.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | By Tom Stump
Sept. 14, 1970, dawned wet and overcast in Southern Laos. Sixteen Special Forces troops with their Montagnard allies were beginning their fourth and final day deep in enemy territory. Code-named Operation Tailwind, their mission was to attract enemy attention to relieve another besieged allied force. A recent CNN report has seriously misrepresented this incident. Although CNN has apologized for "serious faults" in its story, I feel obliged to tell what I saw. By every measure, the Special Forces group had successfully completed its mission.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | By Steven Thomma and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Pentagon officials said yesterday that the special forces troops who raided a Taliban command compound injured or killed Taliban fighters, seized intelligence material, and destroyed the facility. The raid, which took place overnight Friday into yesterday morning, was the first confirmed face-to-face ground warfare involving U.S. troops in Afghanistan. The U.S. special forces also engaged Taliban fighters at an airfield in southern Afghanistan, brushing aside their "light resistance," collecting intelligence, and destroying a small cache of weapons.
NEWS
January 31, 2006 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Pentagon plans to expand the military's special-operations forces, build more bombers, and strengthen ties with foreign allies and other parts of the U.S. government to destroy terrorist networks abroad and defend against them at home. The plans are part of a series of changes outlined in the Quadrennial Defense Review that will be delivered to Congress next Monday. They represent a shift in focus from defeating foreign armies to fighting terrorists and other irregular forces in what military planners now call "the long war. " According to a draft copy, the Pentagon plans to boost the overall number of special operations troops by 15 percent.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If the United States is to play a major role in an offensive on international terrorists, current and former senior commanders say, U.S. forces will have to be retrained for pinpoint strikes in foreign lands, made lighter and more mobile, and retooled with better intelligence, communications and surveillance systems. U.S. forces are the world's mightiest, capable of wreaking massive devastation. But nuclear weapons, tanks and aircraft carriers are about as useful for fighting the shadowy, stateless fanatics behind Tuesday's catastrophic acts of terrorism as a sledge hammer is for micro-surgery.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By David Zucchino, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the news came, everyone who knew and loved Larry Freedman was struck by a curious thought: Now wasn't it just like Larry to run off to Somalia and not tell anybody? No one - not his sister or his father, not his best friend or his old Army buddy - knew that retired Sgt. Lawrence Freedman was working on Operation Restore Hope. And just like that, he was gone, blown up at age 51 by a tank mine Dec. 23 on his way to some obscure hamlet in the Somali desert. Lawrence Norman Freedman, known as "Gus" to his old Mount Airy friends and "Super Jew" to his Green Beret comrades, died as he had lived: fast, hard and discreetly.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
While the media focus on the battle to drive ISIS from the Iraqi city of Fallujah, the most critical drive to crush the caliphate is happening in Syria. Right now. Helped by U.S. special forces, Syrian Kurds and Sunni tribal fighters are laying the groundwork for retaking the caliphate's capital in Raqqa. I was in northern Syria in March and talked to Syrian Kurdish leaders about these efforts, which are heating up north of the city. This week, I heard the latest details from Saleh Muslim, a top political leader of the Syrian Kurds.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
FORGET THE IDEA of a stadium. Temple University is in the unique position to establish a leadership role by rallying other colleges and universities to donate money to the struggling public schools. By passing on the stadium, Temple makes a powerful statement that can make a much larger impact in the lives of students on the playing field of "life. " By kick-starting a program, higher education in the city benefits on many levels. Peter Tobia Philadelphia Letter told a lie Lora Neal rants on about the Black Lives Matter movement mentioning all the familiar names, but that's what it is. Just rants.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Cook loves to enchant an audience. As a high school student in Palos Verdes, Calif., he once performed as a close-up magician in front of Hollywood greats including Daniel Day-Lewis and Sylvester Stallone. Now pursuing a doctorate in economics at the University of Pennsylvania, Cook was once a member of the Magic Castle Junior Society in Los Angeles, where young performers sharpen their magic acts. Now, he's found another outlet for creating alternative realities. His first thriller novel, Sabotage , is being published Tuesday by Tor/Forge Books, followed by a release party and book signing at the Penn Bookstore at 6 p.m. Sabotage follows the adventures of a team of graduate students working to take down a villain with dangerous weapons technology who controls a hijacked cruise ship and could be linked to the disappearance of a Stanford University professor.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
Why is everybody making noise just because I took some girls who were in Western education anyway? - Abubakar Shekau Those are the words of the Islamist leader described as "the craziest of all commanders. " He organized the raid that kidnapped 300 girls from a Nigerian boarding school three weeks ago. Reason doesn't seem to be in Shekau's vocabulary, which only adds to the urgency to free the children. While the United States has offered intelligence assistance, hostage negotiators, and other aid, Britain said it will send special forces if Nigeria asks.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Esam Mohamed, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - More than 1,000 inmates escaped a prison Saturday in Libya as protesters stormed political party offices across the country, signs of the simmering unrest gripping a nation overrun by militias and awash in weaponry. It was not immediately clear whether the jailbreak at al-Kweifiya prison was related to the demonstrations. Protesters had massed across Libya over the killing of an activist critical of the country's Muslim Brotherhood. Inmates started a riot and set fires after security forces opened fire on three detainees who tried to escape the facility outside Benghazi, a security official at al-Kweifiya prison said.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
Gunman kills 4 at Israeli bank JERUSALEM - A gunman stormed into a bank in the southern Israeli city of Beersheba on Monday, killing four people and taking a hostage before killing himself, police said. Police initially suspected a bungled bank robbery, but later changed their assessment. They identified the gunman as a former military officer who had fallen on hard times financially. The 40-year-old man arrived at the bank to withdraw money and settle a debt, police said. He reportedly got into an argument with the bank manager and came back an hour later with a handgun that was licensed to him and opened fire.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
HARRISBURG - Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's "major claims" as he appeals a child sexual-abuse conviction include the many years that went by before accusers notified authorities, according to a pair of defense filings Monday. Attorney Norris Gelman said only one of the eight boys who testified against Sandusky reported allegations of abuse promptly. The others waited between four and 14 years. Penn State's costs from the scandal topped $41 million as of the end of December, the university posted Monday.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Richard Leiby and Sayed Salahuddin, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai on Sunday ordered all U.S. Special Operations forces to leave a strategically important province in two weeks, alleging that they have been involved in the torture and murder of "innocent people. " A presidential office statement that followed a meeting of Afghanistan's National Security Council also demanded an immediate halt to special-forces activity in Wardak province west of Kabul, a hub of counterinsurgency operations. The action comes after Karzai last week banned his forces from calling in NATO air strikes in populated areas, citing civilian casualties.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Should the United States leave any troops in Afghanistan after 2014? Would that prevent the return of militant jihadis who could threaten nuclear-armed Pakistan next door? With most or all U.S. forces set to leave Afghanistan by 2014, President Obama is considering a "zero option," which would mean relying on drone strikes and special forces to counter militants, while leaving overall security to shaky Afghan forces. Is this the best approach, I asked Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, who, as U.S. commander in Afghanistan, presided over the U.S. troop "surge," but also led the Joint Special Operations Command in its fight against al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI)
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