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Special Master

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SPORTS
March 14, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a closed-door meeting tomorrow at an undisclosed Philadelphia location, some of the nation's foremost legal minds could determine who lines up as the Eagles' No. 1 wide receiver next season. Stephen B. Burbank, a University of Pennsylvania law professor, will step up for his first time as the impartial "special master" for the NFL and hear arguments about whether wide receiver Terrell Owens should get to be a free agent. Owens was all set to become a free agent in February, with a huge payday looming, when his agent, David Joseph, missed a Feb. 21 deadline to file the paperwork with Owens' team, the San Francisco 49ers.
NEWS
March 31, 2004 | By BRAD GEIGER
AS A LIFE-long Philadelphia sports fan, I rejoiced when our Eagles landed Terrell Owens. For once, the annual pains of January were replaced with promise, with the hope of a premier wide receiver shedding defenders, catching Donovan McNabb's passes and carrying us over the Berlin Wall of NFC title games and into the Super Bowl. Yet something was missing. After the Eagles, 49ers and Ravens worked out an agreement, a part of me still felt empty. I was elated about Owens, but wondered: "What will become of the Special Master we read so much about?"
SPORTS
March 11, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a Hail Mary attempt to win Terrell Owens' freedom to play for the Eagles, the NFL Players Association has invoked the "special master" clause in its labor agreement with the league. The special master is an independent legal expert, agreed upon by the league and the union, who hears the arguments and makes binding decisions, under review by a federal judge. The current special master, since 2002, is Stephen Burbank, who happens to be a longtime professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester Upland School District officials agreed yesterday to expand the tenure and powers of a court-appointed special master who is overseeing the reform of the district's special-education program. The district also agreed to hire a full-time psychologist; speech, occupational and behavioral therapists; and other specially trained professionals. The agreement came to light at a hearing in federal court before U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d in Philadelphia. It is part of a series of reforms ordered by Gawthrop to create a functioning special-education program in the district, which is rated among the worst in the state.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | By Suzette Hackney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Federal Judge Robert S. Gawthrop ruled with a stern hand Wednesday, appointing a special master to oversee reform in the Chester Upland School District and threatening anyone who got in the way of improvements, but yesterday his tone was conciliatory and encouraging in a visit to Chester High School. Gawthrop, along with new special master David J. Rostetter, met with teachers, students and administrators in the school library to discuss ways to improve the district's special education program and its overall education system.
SPORTS
March 13, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrell Owens' hearing to determine if the wide receiver should be declared a free agent has been rescheduled from today to Monday and will take place in Philadelphia rather than via conference call. "We thought it would be better if every one involved had a chance to sit in person and hear the discussions and arguments on both sides," Carl Francis, a spokesman for the NFL Players Association, said yesterday. Stephen Burbank, the University of Pennsylvania law professor who will hear the "special master" case at his campus office, said the decision to meet in person was agreed upon by all parties involved.
SPORTS
March 9, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A University of Pennsylvania law professor could decide Terrell Owens' fate. The NFL Players Association issued a news release yesterday stating that it had filed a "special master" case on behalf of the wide receiver, who was traded to the Baltimore Ravens but desperately wants to be declared a free agent so he can sign with the Eagles. Stephen B. Burbank, the David Berger Professor for the Administration of Justice at Penn, will hear the case. He was jointly selected in November 2002 by the league and the players association to serve as the special master.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For nearly five years, a federal judge has ordered, exhorted, nagged and warned the Chester Upland School District to reform its special-education system. On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d ran out of patience. He declared the district in contempt of court and announced he would appoint an independent administrator, or "special master," to carry out the court- ordered reforms. In a withering 29-page opinion, Gawthrop described a school district hamstrung by mismanagement, waste and incompetence, despite having been given "opportunity, after opportunity, after opportunity to set things straight.
SPORTS
March 13, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen B. Burbank's voice-mail greeting at the University of Pennsylvania last weekend informed callers that the law professor was on vacation, providing the number of a Southern California beach resort to call "in case of emergency. " Then came the emergency - the San Francisco 49ers traded Terrell Owens to the Baltimore Ravens instead of to the Eagles - and everyone called. On Monday, the NFL Players Association dusted off a seldom-used article in its labor contract with the league, requesting that an impartial "special master" review the Owens situation.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The court-appointed special master for the Chester Upland School District is expected to propose tomorrow that the state take over and manage the district's special education programs - including hiring and firing staff. David Rostetter said he planned to release a 100-page proposal to district officials in which he will say that the drastic step, a first for Pennsylvania public education, is necessary due to the ongoing educational crisis. "No place else in Pennsylvania is like Chester Upland.
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NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
While declaring that Moorestown "has made a good-faith effort thus far" toward meeting its affordable-housing obligations, Burlington County Superior Court Judge Ronald Bookbinder on Tuesday ruled that an advocacy group could challenge the constitutionality of the township's plan. But Bookbinder denied a request by the advocacy group, Fair Share Housing Center, that he allow builders to sue the township for exclusionary zoning, at least for now. Two builders also had petitioned to be allowed to sue. "Are they [Moorestown]
BUSINESS
November 24, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The journey of SugarHouse Casino from its selection for one of two Philadelphia slots licenses and its opening to gamblers was long, winding, and four years in duration - from December 2006 to September 2010. Barring another financial crisis such as the one that began in 2008, which hobbled SugarHouse's financing, prospects of opening more quickly are good for Live! Hotel & Casino, which the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board selected Tuesday to build Philadelphia's second casino.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
State Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffery's invective-laced apology for sending pornographic e-mails only makes it more urgent to resolve his status on the bench as soon as possible. The backhanded apology, which had the audacity to question whether he "offended anyone" by sending or receiving more than 230 sexually explicit e-mails, criticized Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille for creating a "cooked-up controversy. " The jurists' antagonism is disturbing enough, but that a Supreme Court justice thought nothing of e-mailing porn destroys public trust.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Petro Vlahos, 96, whose work took movie viewers to a spectacular chariot race in Ben-Hur and let Dick Van Dyke dance among penguins in Mary Poppins , died Feb. 10, his family announced. No other details were released. Mr. Vlahos laid the groundwork that made a modern movie genre - the blockbuster - possible. He did it by vastly improving a composite-image process commonly known as the "blue-screen effect. " By devising new ways to combine separately shot footage of actors and backgrounds into a single scene, he opened the door to such spectaculars as Star Wars and Titanic.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On this historic day, I thought we'd go once more into the breach with the Field Negro, the plain-talking, fire-stoking Philly blogger about all things Black. Field and I have this occasional date - we meet over lunch at the Down Home Diner and see how many people we can frighten with our conversation. We tend to talk about race. We first met during primary season 2008, after Barack Obama's epic "A More Perfect Union" speech. We touched base after the election of America's first black president - a result neither of us expected.
SPORTS
September 19, 2012
New Orleans Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma met with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell on Monday to discuss his suspension that was temporarily lifted. "I've got no expectations right now," Vilma said as he entered NFL headquarters with his lawyer, Peter Ginsberg, shortly before 2 p.m. They came out a little more than three hours later, and Vilma called the meeting "very frank, very truthful. " Vilma was one of four players suspended in the bounty scandal. But an appeals panel this month said Goodell must clarify his rulings to ensure no part of his decisions was based on salary-cap violations.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
TRENTON - A judge appointed a special overseer Tuesday to ensure that foreclosure proceedings in New Jersey conform to the law. The move comes after state Supreme Court Chief Justice Stuart Rabner in December ordered some of the nation's biggest mortgage lenders to show why their foreclosure operations should not be suspended in New Jersey over reports of widespread irregularities. General Equity Judge Mary C. Jacobson, designated by Rabner to oversee foreclosure matters in the state, ruled Tuesday to adopt a stipulation requiring the lenders to follow a series of regulations that Jacobson said would safeguard the foreclosure process.
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey has been directed to appear in federal court in Washington next week in connection with alleged destruction of evidence that may have been crucial to a lawsuit about mass arrests of antiglobalization protesters in 2002. A special master, U.S. District Judge John M. Facciola, who was appointed by another federal judge to look into the evidence matter, issued an order last month directing Ramsey and 13 others to appear in court. Facciola said the people needed to be advised of their constitutional right not to incriminate themselves because there was "a possibility that the completion of my responsibilities will lead to a referral to the United States Attorney's Office for possible prosecution.
NEWS
March 25, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Responding to calls for help from the developers of the SugarHouse casino, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court yesterday appointed a special master to mediate disputes with Philadelphia officials. In a petition in January, the investment group had accused Mayor Nutter and his administration of holding up construction of the waterfront slots parlor. The Supreme Court named John W. Herron, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge since 1988, as special master. It also ordered the city to immediately issue a foundation permit "without condition.
NEWS
March 29, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert B. Wolf, 90, of Miquon, retired senior partner in the law firm of Wolf Block, Schorr & Solis-Cohen, community activist, and advocate for juvenile justice, died of heart failure Friday at home. Mr. Wolf became involved in juvenile justice in the 1960s while serving as chairman of the Pennsylvania Committee on Crime and Delinquency. In 1968, he headed a Philadelphia Bar Association Committee to develop a program to pay for legal representation for juveniles. In 1984, U.S. District Judge Joseph S. Lord named Mr. Wolf a special master to be Lord's "eyes and ears" at the Youth Study Center in Philadelphia after allegations that staff were beating inmates.
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