CollectionsSpecial Olympics
IN THE NEWS

Special Olympics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
About 130 police, IRS agents and other members of South Jersey law enforcement are expected to take part Friday in a 67-mile torch run from Atlantic City to Camden to benefit the Special Olympics. This is the seventh year for the statewide run, but only the second year that South Jersey law enforcement officials will be involved, said Gary Evangelista, a Camden patrolman who with Pat Vesci of Camden County Central Dispatch organized the event. Last year, the South Jersey torch run covered 12 miles, from the LARC School in Bellmawr to the Hall of Justice in Camden.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The 40 equestrians stood singing or listening to " . . . and the home of the brave," the last line of the national anthem. Many of them were about to start a brave effort, testing their skills in the third annual Montgomery County Special Olympics Equestrian Event, held last Sunday in Evansburg State Park. The games are for mentally and physically handicapped athletes ranging in age from 8 to 40. They compete individually and as members of teams in such events as pole bending, relay races, and walking and trotting.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | For The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
They roller-skated, rode horses, ran, played volleyball in competition at Villanova last weekend. The three-day Fall Festival of the 1992 Special Olympics drew participants from throughout the state.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | by Regina Medina , Daily News Staff Writer
James Moody took the Visa card slogan to heart: it was every place he wanted to be. The 34-year-old Montgomery County resident used the credit card to purchase a bunch of compact discs, a slew of clothes and bags of groceries to stock his refrigerator in Souderton. Problem was, the Visa didn't belong to the CD-loving clotheshorse. It was the property of the state's Special Olympics program, which employed Moody as a controller from May 1999 until he was fired in December. Moody was arrested and charged yesterday with theft, fraud, and related offenses and is being held in jail after he failed to post $50,000 bail.
NEWS
March 21, 2009 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
WASHINGTON - President Obama's appearance on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno attracted the largest audience to NBC's late-night program in more than four years. Unfortunately for the president, that meant a lot of people also heard him make a wisecrack about the Special Olympics that was criticized as insensitive and prompted the White House to swiftly apologize. His gaffe came toward the end of the interview Thursday, when Leno ribbed Obama about his poor bowling skills, derided on the campaign trail.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Dante Anthony Fuoco, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lady Gaga said the word when her song "Born This Way" was labeled a Madonna rip-off. LeBron James muttered it in May after a reporter posed a question to a teammate. The word got Tracy Morgan in trouble last month, and was used nearly 20 times in the 2008 film Tropic Thunder , to the discontent of some. And on the heels of legislation by other states and Congress, Pennsylvania is poised to remove the word from its legislative lexicon. Retarded - derived from mental retardation , once a sterile, clinical term for a person with intellectual disabilities - is increasingly considered a demeaning description and hurtful verbal jab. So is retarded - "the 'R' word," as some now say - a slur?
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | BY RICH PORCO
The Special Olympics program could use your help. As you're probably aware, the Special Olympics is the world's largest program of sports training and athletic competition for mentally retarded children and adults, with over one million participants. I'm proud to be able to say that the 1700 mummers in the Murray Comic Club, of which I am president, are volunteering their time as comics and face- painters to help raise money to benefit the Special Olympics program. We're asking area residents and businesses to donate $1 to benefit the Special Olympics by entering a balloon in "The Special Balloon Olympics.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Ellen Dean Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
Cipriano Gomez is not a typical sports champion. Just 11, Gomez is a special-education student, and he won two medals at the annual state Special Olympics skiing competition March 9-11. Although he was bumped up from the novice to the intermediate class at the last minute, Gomez won a silver medal in the slalom, a bronze medal in the downhill and a fourth-place ribbon in the giant slalom. "He has a very good attitude, and he trains very well," said Paula Clark, a music teacher at the Chester County Intermediate Unit, who is county manager for the Special Olympics, the nationwide sports program for mentally handicapped children and adults.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
As her son John competed in the 5-kilometer run at Saturday's South Jersey Special Olympics, Kathleen Jeffries urged him to slow down. "He wants to be out in front, but he sometimes has trouble pacing himself," Jeffries said as her son rounded the far turn on the cinder track at Washington Township High School. "He used to be a sprinter; and the first time he ran a distance race, he started out way ahead and had nothing left for the rest of the race. Sometimes, he still has problems with his pacing.
NEWS
May 10, 2004
I AM APPALLED at the op-ed you featured on the Special Olympics. Without even getting into my opinion on such segregated activities, ones in which people with disabilities are seen as pitiful and less than worthy of participation in society with the rest of the human race, you need to know that your language is offensive and demeaning. "Mentally handicapped"? "Emotionally retarded"? "Retarded"? These terms are as offensive as any racial or ethnic slur. And how comforting to know that the Special Olympics segregates individuals according to their IQ and so-called "ability levels.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John Pierce, 74, of Philadelphia, a retired elementary school physical education teacher, died Thursday, May 26, of cancer at a hospice in Christiana, Del. Known to family as "Johnny," Mr. Pierce was a native of Chester, Md., on Kent Island, the largest island in the Chesapeake Bay. He was the sixth of eight children born to Lina Pauls and Percy Pierce Sr. Mr. Pierce graduated from Kennard High School in Centreville, Md., in 1959, and earned...
SPORTS
April 11, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Columnist
Washington Township High School quarterback Mike Piperno passed for 1,563 yards and 17 touchdowns last season. But he's not the only Minuteman with a good arm. "A couple of these kids could really throw," Piperno said of participants in a Project Unify clinic on Wednesday. "I was getting nervous for my [starting quarterback] spot. " Piperno and fellow juniors Austin Hacking and Ryan Brady led the way as about 50 football players teamed with schoolmates with and without disabilities in a clinic designed to teach youngsters about passing, catching, and taking handoffs.
SPORTS
January 26, 2016 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Ten cups. There always has to be 10 cups. That's the way Rachel Grace, the manager for the North Penn girls' basketball team, likes it. Or rather, that's what coach Maggie deMarteleire prefers, and similar to the mind-set of a successful player, Grace does what her coach asks of her. Over the course of a game, the conscientious Grace immediately greets each player who is subbed out with water. During timeouts, she supplies the cups as soon as the whistle blows. Then she's back, meticulously filling the cups throughout the entirety of the contest.
TRAVEL
January 24, 2016
Eagle-eyed idea Connecticut . Cold, clear days are good for spotting bald eagles, hawks, and kestrels from the Shepaug Dam overlooking the Housatonic River. Observation area run by volunteers, open Wed., Sat., Sun. Reservations required. Shepaug Dam Bald Eagle Observation , Southbury, through first weekend of March. Hard stuff Delaware . Tours of a craft distillery give an inside look at making gin, vodka, corn whiskey, and experimental spirits. Set in a 1940s-era movie theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lovable Lyle the Crocodile was discovered lounging in a bathtub in a Manhattan brownstone in 1962. First by the Primms, the family that bought the building from the acrobatic reptile's performing partner, Signor Valenti, and then by readers of Bernard Waber's classic children's book The House on East 88th Street . What followed was a series about the cosmopolitan croc - he shops the Upper East Side, picnics in Central Park, skates at Rockefeller Center...
SPORTS
August 28, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
DARRYL DAWKINS was more than a court jester. More than a supplier of monikers for dunks. And more than the guy in the loud, pastel or snakeskin suits. I was fortunate enough to know Dawkins on a personal level. On four occasions, he came to speak at the basketball camp I operate and no distance was too far. One time he left his home in Allentown an extra hour early (6:30 a.m.) because he was afraid he might run into traffic on the Turnpike and be late for his 9:30 engagement in Willingboro, N.J. That's the Darryl Dawkins I was fortunate to know.
SPORTS
July 28, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE SPECIAL Olympics World Games kicked off in Los Angeles over the weekend, and the Opening Ceremonies included an inspiring speech by Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles. Charles, who won a national title at Texas and has gained over 1,000 yards each of the last three seasons - and five of his seven with the Chiefs - shared a story that resonated with the crowd. "When I was a boy, I had trouble reading," Charles said. "I found out I had a learning disability. People made fun of me. They said I would never go anywhere.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
TAILGATERS AT Penn State football games will have a new brew to wash down all their 'dogs and ribs next season. The Latrobe City Brewing Co. is producing the Paterno Legacy Series of beer in honor of the late Joe Paterno, who died in January of 2012. JoePa spent 62 seasons with the Lions, 46 as their head coach, before he was fired amid the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal. The idea for the beer came from Jay Paterno, Joe's son, who was his father's assistant for 17 seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Channing: Not so good Channing Tatum , who continues to grow as an artist - and no doubt as a human being - tells fans in a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) session that some of his early performances weren't exactly worthy of an Oscar. "How many times is too many times to seeĀ  Step Up ?" one fan asked TC of his 2006 romantic dance film co-starringĀ  Jenna Dewan Tatum . "Hahahahaha! I guess you need to see it as many times as it takes you to realize how bad my acting is in it," says TC. "And fast-forward to the dancing parts after that.
NEWS
June 6, 2015
ISSUE | SPECIAL ATHLETES Relay a message Despite advances that have been made over the years, men, women, and children with disabilities face negative stereotypes on a daily basis. This summer, Special Olympics and Bank of America are providing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for people to join the movement for equality. We're bringing the Unified Relay Across America to cities and towns throughout the country, including Philadelphia, where it continues Friday. The relay will give Philadelphians an unprecedented opportunity to show their commitment to inclusion and respect for all by simply getting involved.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|