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NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is stepping up aid for Mexico's bloody drug war with a new U.S.-based special-operations headquarters to teach Mexican security forces how to hunt drug cartels the same way special operations teams hunt al-Qaeda, according to documents and interviews with multiple U.S. officials. Such assistance could help newly elected Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto establish a military force to focus on drug criminal networks that have terrorized Mexico's northern states and threatened the Southwest border.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By KIMBERLY DOZIER, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - As traditional military operations are cut back, the Pentagon is moving to expand the worldwide reach of the U.S. Special Operations Command to strike back wherever threats arise. U.S. officials say the Pentagon and the White House have embraced a proposal by special-operations chief Adm. Bill McRaven to push troops that are withdrawing from war zones to reinforce special-operations units in areas somewhat neglected during the decade-long focus on al Qaeda. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta shared few details in the new Pentagon budget he outlined yesterday, but officials explained the plan in greater detail to the Associated Press.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Heidi Vogt and Amir Shah, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - A police officer opened fire on U.S. and Afghan forces at a police headquarters in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, sparking a firefight that killed two U.S. troops and two other Afghan policemen. The attacker was also killed in the shootout, officials said. In a second incident, outside Kabul, U.S. troops fired on a truck approaching their military convoy, killing two Afghan men inside. The shooting in the eastern Wardak province was the latest in a series of insider attacks against coalition and Afghan forces that have threatened to undermine their alliance at a time when cooperation would aid the handover of security responsibility to local forces next year.
NEWS
February 4, 2006 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Pentagon plans to strengthen its special-operations forces to fight terrorists and insurgents in the coming decades, but it will not increase the military's ground forces or eliminate any of its most expensive weapons programs, according to a long-range plan released yesterday. The Quadrennial Defense Review, the Pentagon's strategic plan that is updated every four years, makes the war on terrorism the military's top priority, Gen. Peter Pace, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said.
NEWS
April 20, 2003 | By Joseph L. Galloway INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An old adage says that no war plan survives first contact with the enemy, but the central element of the American plan to defeat Iraq - quickly punching through to Baghdad - did. Gen. Tommy Franks, the coalition commander, fixed his sights on the Iraqi capital and never wavered. After initially proposing a much larger invasion force, he eventually relented, accepted the view of Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld, and assumed considerable risk by launching a bold attack with a relatively small force of only three divisions.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. military commanders said Wednesday that there were no plans to turn the Afghan war over to CIA control after 2014, with special operations answering to American intelligence officials. "There are absolutely no plans right now to put special operations under Title 50 in Afghanistan now that I am aware of," said Adm. Bill McRaven, the overall special-operations commander, referring to the legal authority under which the CIA operates. Gen. James Mattis, who heads U.S. Central Command, and McRaven told the House Armed Services Committee that they would continue an emphasis on special-operations training of Afghan forces, especially at the village level.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Top Pentagon officials are considering putting elite special-operations troops under CIA control in Afghanistan after 2014, just as they were during last year's raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan, sources told the Associated Press. The plan is one of several possible scenarios Pentagon staffers are debating. It has not yet been presented to Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta, the White House, or Congress, the sources said. If the plan were adopted, the United States and Afghanistan could say there are no more U.S. troops on the ground in the war-torn country because once the SEALs, Rangers, and other elite units are assigned to CIA control, even temporarily, they become spies.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
FORT BRAGG, N.C. - A scene of stomach-clenching gore confronted the special operations troops: the shredded remains of a suicide bomber, scattered around the checkpoint. But the blood and body are fake, like the Hollywood-style explosion that began a classroom exercise designed to teach these students to look past the grisly mess for the evidence that could lead to those who built the bomb. Fort Bragg's Special Warfare Center shows how the United States has turned hunting terror networks into half-science, half-art-form since the al-Qaeda attacks of Sept.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
A veteran Philadelphia police officer has been named to a top job in the SEPTA police force. E. Teresa Peay-Clark, 49, of Northeast Philadelphia, will assume the newly created position of inspector of special operations. She will be one of two inspectors, who serve as the top deputies to recently hired Police Chief Thomas Nestel III. Peay-Clark, who will be paid $102,336 a year, will be in charge of investigations, SWAT teams, canine operations, and training. - Paul Nussbaum  
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Hillel Italie and Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A member of the Navy SEAL team that killed Osama bin Laden has written a firsthand account of the operation, triggering more questions about the possible public release of classified information involving the historic assault of the terror leader's compound in Pakistan. U.S. military officials say they do not believe the book has been read or cleared by the Defense Department, which reviews publications by military members to make sure no classified material is revealed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2013
A veteran Philadelphia police officer has been named to a top job in the SEPTA police force. E. Teresa Peay-Clark, 49, of Northeast Philadelphia, will assume the newly created position of inspector of special operations. She will be one of two inspectors, who serve as the top deputies to recently hired Police Chief Thomas Nestel III. Peay-Clark, who will be paid $102,336 a year, will be in charge of investigations, SWAT teams, canine operations, and training. - Paul Nussbaum  
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Heidi Vogt and Amir Shah, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - A police officer opened fire on U.S. and Afghan forces at a police headquarters in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, sparking a firefight that killed two U.S. troops and two other Afghan policemen. The attacker was also killed in the shootout, officials said. In a second incident, outside Kabul, U.S. troops fired on a truck approaching their military convoy, killing two Afghan men inside. The shooting in the eastern Wardak province was the latest in a series of insider attacks against coalition and Afghan forces that have threatened to undermine their alliance at a time when cooperation would aid the handover of security responsibility to local forces next year.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is stepping up aid for Mexico's bloody drug war with a new U.S.-based special-operations headquarters to teach Mexican security forces how to hunt drug cartels the same way special operations teams hunt al-Qaeda, according to documents and interviews with multiple U.S. officials. Such assistance could help newly elected Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto establish a military force to focus on drug criminal networks that have terrorized Mexico's northern states and threatened the Southwest border.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Mark Bowden
Mark Bowden is the author of "The Finish: The Killing of Osama bin Laden," from which the following is excerpted The raid that killed Osama bin Laden on May 1, 2011, was the brief, climactic end of a story that had begun almost 10 years before, with the attacks of Sept. 11. It had taken that long to put the al-Qaeda founder in America's crosshairs. Even so, as President Obama instructed CIA Director Leon Panetta and Joint Special Operations Commander Bill McRaven to launch the raid on the curious compound in Abbottabad, he was only half sure bin Laden was there - "This is 50-50," he told his advisers.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Hillel Italie and Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A member of the Navy SEAL team that killed Osama bin Laden has written a firsthand account of the operation, triggering more questions about the possible public release of classified information involving the historic assault of the terror leader's compound in Pakistan. U.S. military officials say they do not believe the book has been read or cleared by the Defense Department, which reviews publications by military members to make sure no classified material is revealed.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Heidi Vogt and Rahim Faiez, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan's president said Saturday the United States had put the two countries' security pact at risk with a unilateral air strike that killed 18 civilians, and a Taliban suicide bomber killed four French soldiers responding to a tip-off about a bomb hidden under a bridge. The violence and the dispute highlight the muddled nature of the international mission in Afghanistan as NATO coalition countries try to shift to a training role in a country still very much at war. The majority of NATO and U.S. forces are scheduled to leave the country by the end of 2014, but the exit is looking far from neat at the beginning of the hot summer months, when fighting typically surges.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALANDI, AFGHANISTAN - Moving from house to house, a U.S. Army sergeant opened fire yesterday on Afghan villagers as they slept, killing 16 people - mostly women and children - in an attack that reignited fury at the U.S. presence following a wave of deadly protests over Americans burning Qurans. The attack threatened the deepest breach yet in U.S.-Afghan relations, raising questions both in Washington and Kabul about why American troops are still fighting in Afghanistan after 10 years of conflict and the killing of Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. military commanders said Wednesday that there were no plans to turn the Afghan war over to CIA control after 2014, with special operations answering to American intelligence officials. "There are absolutely no plans right now to put special operations under Title 50 in Afghanistan now that I am aware of," said Adm. Bill McRaven, the overall special-operations commander, referring to the legal authority under which the CIA operates. Gen. James Mattis, who heads U.S. Central Command, and McRaven told the House Armed Services Committee that they would continue an emphasis on special-operations training of Afghan forces, especially at the village level.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Top Pentagon officials are considering putting elite special-operations troops under CIA control in Afghanistan after 2014, just as they were during last year's raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan, sources told the Associated Press. The plan is one of several possible scenarios Pentagon staffers are debating. It has not yet been presented to Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta, the White House, or Congress, the sources said. If the plan were adopted, the United States and Afghanistan could say there are no more U.S. troops on the ground in the war-torn country because once the SEALs, Rangers, and other elite units are assigned to CIA control, even temporarily, they become spies.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By KIMBERLY DOZIER, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - As traditional military operations are cut back, the Pentagon is moving to expand the worldwide reach of the U.S. Special Operations Command to strike back wherever threats arise. U.S. officials say the Pentagon and the White House have embraced a proposal by special-operations chief Adm. Bill McRaven to push troops that are withdrawing from war zones to reinforce special-operations units in areas somewhat neglected during the decade-long focus on al Qaeda. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta shared few details in the new Pentagon budget he outlined yesterday, but officials explained the plan in greater detail to the Associated Press.
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