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NEWS
August 17, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
For the 100th time, students will assemble today for the first day of classes at an institution whose promotional literature boasts, "There is no other place like Milton Hershey School. " And it's true. Indeed, there is no other place on Earth quite like it. It is the world's wealthiest, largest residential school for students in prekindergarten through 12th grade, school officials say. It sprawls over 10,000 acres of rolling green hills and is centered on a domed, marble building.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Where others saw just a slightly rundown day camp, school Superintendent Carmine DeSopo saw a state-of-the-art school for students with severe emotional and behavioral problems. That was 1988. Nearly nine years later, DeSopo's vision has become a reality, with Wednesday's opening of a core facility by the Burlington County Special Services School District for high school-age students unable to succeed in a traditional setting. The $6 million, 40,000-square-foot facility is the main building on the 44-acre Lumberton campus.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a thin line, Clearview Regional School District Superintendent Michael Toscano says, between a problem child and a child with problems. And both can be overlooked in the sometimes crowded world of public education. But with a plan that he says will likely take effect when classes begin in September, both groups may get some extra attention at Clearview. The district is finalizing plans for an alternative school that will operate in the high school's building after school hours.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At the end of the business day, Christopher Tompkins hurries from Ocean City Primary School with typical enthusiasm. It's the start of the day where the difference between Christopher and his classmates is most noticeable. The 7-year-old can't wait to get to the job. And it may be his hard-won victory to attend his neighborhood public school that fuels his desire. "We won, we won," Christopher joyfully chants as he talks about the school district's failed attempt to have him transferred to a facility for handicapped children.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
TODAY, THERESA Kellenbenz is reading this column. Until recently, this is something the 65-year-old great-grandmother could not do. "I can read words now, books. " Kellenbenz, a wisp of a woman, glows when she says this. "I've read about 15 books. Not real high books, but I read them. " That would be a big enough accomplishment for anyone. But as nurturing grandmothers tend to do, Kellenbenz wanted her family to share in her success. So, shortly after starting the literacy tutoring program last year at the Lutheran Settlement House in Fishtown, Kellenbenz encouraged her 46-year-old daughter, Dawn Marston, to join.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro school board voted last night to appeal a decision by the state education commissioner to classify the former head of the township's school for problem students as a high school principal. Commissioner Saul Cooperman ruled earlier this month that Joseph Pezzullo be named a principal instead of being laid off by the board when the special school was closed last June. Cooperman also ruled that Pezzullo be given back pay at the pay scale for principals from the time of his layoff.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Coatesville school board will hold a public hearing tomorrow night on several proposals to avoid overcrowding at three of the five elementary schools. District administrators have predicted that in the next few years, the district will have a slight increase in the number of elementary school students. That, combined with the district's recent effort to keep class sizes small, is expected to produce overcrowding at Caln, East Fallowfield and Friendship Elementary Schools.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro school board last night took a step toward resolving a 13- month legal battle between the district and its former coordinator of the special school for students with discipline problems. Eight of the district's nine board members voted to pay Joseph Pezzullo the $48,872 he would have earned in 1987-88 had the Alternate School not been closed in July 1987. Although Pezzullo will receive the retroactive pay, his future in the district remained uncertain.
SPORTS
January 1, 1991 | By Gwen Knapp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linebacker Lance Johnstone, a three-year starter on a Germantown team that improved from 0-10 in 1988 to 8-1 this season, will play college ball with a Temple team that has made a similar turnaround. Johnstone made the oral commitment on Dec. 16, the last day of his official visit to Temple. Rutgers, Delaware State and Virginia Union also offered to pay for visits, but Temple was his first and last stop. Delaware State is Division I-AA, and Virginia Union is Division II, and "I've always had a dream of playing Division I football," he said.
NEWS
July 16, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dozens of principals in Philadelphia public schools are to be replaced next fall, including those at large high schools troubled last year by brawls and the death of a teenager during a basketball game. Among those scheduled to move to other schools are Gloria Pelzer, principal of Germantown High School, and her son, Hilderbrand Pelzer 3d, principal of Simon Gratz High School in Nicetown. Both Pelzers, who have been at their schools three years, have been reassigned to principal jobs at smaller schools.
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NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
The salaries of top administrators at private special-needs schools in New Jersey have drawn the attention of a state watchdog, who said dozens of school directors make far more than allowed for their colleagues in public schools. A new report from the Office of the State Auditor says that at least some of the state's nearly 200 private special-needs schools - which are funded by public schools that send students to them - pay exorbitant salaries to their top administrators and that the state has done little to rein in those salaries.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
TODAY, THERESA Kellenbenz is reading this column. Until recently, this is something the 65-year-old great-grandmother could not do. "I can read words now, books. " Kellenbenz, a wisp of a woman, glows when she says this. "I've read about 15 books. Not real high books, but I read them. " That would be a big enough accomplishment for anyone. But as nurturing grandmothers tend to do, Kellenbenz wanted her family to share in her success. So, shortly after starting the literacy tutoring program last year at the Lutheran Settlement House in Fishtown, Kellenbenz encouraged her 46-year-old daughter, Dawn Marston, to join.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
An unexpected change in the process of selecting Renaissance school projects in Camden under the Urban Hope Act, announced Thursday evening at a special school board meeting, incensed several board members. But at least one party was ecstatic. The Camden Center for Youth Development, which has offered educational and counseling services for decades, now will have its Renaissance proposal considered. It is the fourth group to submit a plan. The center had prepared a proposal for a Renaissance school to serve 875 youths in sixth grade through high school.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden School District has failed to serve its basic mission of educating students and must make substantial changes or face state intervention, according to an in-depth review released Thursday by the state Department of Education. New Jersey could take over the district, according to Education Department rules. Instead, it's giving Camden one more chance. The report laid out a series recommendations to the "district in crisis," including embracing the new Renaissance schools concept.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia will close one of its five special-education schools in June. Archangels Academy in Levittown will close, and the school's 30 students will transfer to two other special-education schools operated by the archdiocese, Our Lady of Confidence in Willow Grove and St. Katherine Day School in Wynnewood, the archdiocese announced Monday. Archangels Academy has specialized in educating students who have autism, moderate to mild cognitive impairments, and developmental delays.
NEWS
May 17, 2010 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will close one of its five special-education schools in June. Archangels Academy in Levittown will close, and the school's 30 students will transfer to two other special-education schools operated by the archdiocese: Our Lady of Confidence in Willow Grove and St. Katherine Day School in Wynnewood, the archdiocese announced Monday. Archangels Academy has specialized in educating students who have autism, moderate to mild cognitive impairments and developmental delays.
NEWS
November 2, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Will Camden go for a "super" high school? In a couple of weeks, city residents will get a chance to sound off on a proposal to bring the district's magnet high schools under a new, shared roof on the future Camden High School campus. In an education plan submitted by the Camden school board and now under consideration by the state Department of Education, city school officials are looking at the possibility of moving two - or even all three - of the magnets into Camden High when its $100 million renovation is complete.
NEWS
August 17, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
For the 100th time, students will assemble today for the first day of classes at an institution whose promotional literature boasts, "There is no other place like Milton Hershey School. " And it's true. Indeed, there is no other place on Earth quite like it. It is the world's wealthiest, largest residential school for students in prekindergarten through 12th grade, school officials say. It sprawls over 10,000 acres of rolling green hills and is centered on a domed, marble building.
NEWS
November 28, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 16, Joaquin Rosa was ready to drop out of school. He failed several grades, got into fights, was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and struggled with an overwhelming and disturbing desire to kill someone. He said he was abused by a relative as a child and had a father who was in jail for much of his young life - both fueling his anger. But after nearly a year of counseling to deal with that anger, Rosa was ready to think about school again, and he heeded the words of his grandmother: Be the first person in your family to graduate from high school.
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