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Special Treatment

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NEWS
August 11, 2009
IF YOU listen to Republicans in Harrisburg, Philadelphia's request for legislation to help balance the city budget is a demand for special treatment. However, a quick look at recent history shows that linking Philadelphia's request to the passage of the state budget is actually especially bad treatment. Back in 2003, Pittsburgh was in the middle of a serious financial crisis. Local officials teamed up with members of the state Legislature and sought permission to raise a number of taxes.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
A Parkesburg councilman on Monday accused Mayor William E. Wilson Jr. of receiving special treatment from the borough police and called for an independent investigation. Councilman Donald A. Althouse said the borough police were slow to respond to a disorderly conduct complaint made against Wilson by a resident in September. Althouse also asked that the district attorney or the state attorney general intervene. "I have grave concerns about the conduct of the Police Department," Althouse said at the meeting.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | BY MARIAN B. TASCO
When City Council votes today on Bill No. 298, "Interference with Access to Reproductive Health Care Facilities," it will not be affording special treatment for abortion sites as stated in this column Friday by Michael McMonagle; it will be protecting the constitutional rights of Philadelphia women to a safe and reliable medical procedure. In no way does this legislation prevent Operation Rescue or any similar organization from making its presentation, distributing literature or counseling any woman who is willing to accept their counsel.
NEWS
March 24, 1989
There is a trial in Chicago. In the dock are a couple of real scumbags, "sports agents" who seemed remarkably adept at appropriating large amounts of money from not-very-bright young men. The agents clearly took the money. The only question before the court seems to be whether these greedy dopes willingly submitted to their skinnings. Interestingly enough, it's clear that the agents weren't the only people exploiting these kids. They didn't do nearly as good a job as the universities purporting to educate them.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | by Kathleen Shea, Daily News Television Critic
It's time again for the annual sackful of TV Christmas specials. Despite a trendlet toward chat about religious values on network series lately (did you catch Murphy Brown debating the afterlife with the "FYI" staff the other night?) this year, like all the rest before it, network Christmas programming is geared much more toward "Frosty the Snowman" than babes in the manger. In fact, the one non-animated, non-musical show with overt discussion of religion, a children's special put together for ABC by a couple of ministers, has been bumped here by Channel 6 to 6 o'clock in the morning Sunday, Dec. 5. HIGHLIGHTS OF NEW STUFF: CBS does Christmas commercials throughout the years in "Brought to You by Santa.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Frank Reeves, Special to The Inquirer
Crews from the Philadelphia Electric Co. last month rerouted the electrical circuits leading to the Gladwyne home of Joseph F. Paquette Jr., the company's chairman and chief executive officer. PE spokesman Neal McDermott denied this week that Paquette got special treatment or that work in other neighborhoods was delayed so PE crews could work in Gladwyne. Paquette lives in a Gladwyne neighborhood that has been plagued with downed wires and power outages, especially in the summer during electrical storms.
NEWS
October 22, 2004 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County Commissioner Tom Ellis did not receive special consideration in an alleged domestic violence incident involving his ex-girlfriend, a victim's advocate said yesterday. Maria Macaluso, executive director of the Women's Center of Montgomery County, said that she spoke with the Cheltenham police and local courts to make sure that Ellis' former fiancee, Lisa Ann Whalen, was treated the same as any other woman who filed a petition from abuse order. And while the experience demonstrated serious flaws in the ways that victims are treated, she said, they were the same frustrations experienced by many women who go through the system.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
An alleged drug dealer and murderer from the Dominican Republic received no special treatment when he was given a life-saving heart transplant at Temple University Hospital last Feb. 24, according to officials involved in the case. Bartolome Moya, 36, got the transplant "because he was going to die without it," said hospital spokesman Bob Villier. Howard Nathan, executive director of the Delaware Valley Transplant Program, which coordinates the supply of organs for area hospitals, said Moya was treated just like any other potential recipient.
SPORTS
September 16, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
New Orleans Saints running back Reggie Bush insisted yesterday he and his family have done nothing wrong, responding to allegations that they accepted gifts, money and other benefits worth more than $100,000 from two marketing agents during his career at Southern California. "I'm not worried about any of these allegations or anything like that, because I know what the truth is, like I said from Day 1," Bush said. Yahoo.com reported Thursday that Michael Michaels, a marketing agency investor who wanted to represent the Heisman Trophy winner, and current Bush marketing agent Mike Ornstein supplied Bush and his family with gifts while he was still at USC. Each hoped to represent Bush once he left school.
SPORTS
May 1, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Travis Best, whose unhappy assignment in the first round of the playoffs is to stay in front of Allen Iverson, is not pleased with NBA officials at the moment. Best has fouled out of two games during the series, which the 76ers lead, two games to one, and could close out with a win tomorrow over the Indiana Pacers at Conseco Fieldhouse. Basketball is often a game of percentages, and Best has studied the fouls whistled against him and come up with a numerical value for those calls.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
It felt like now or never to Jesus Galano Sollet. The 50-year-old fisherman had long harbored a plan to flee Cuba for America. But in December 2014, when President Obama and Raul Castro announced the first diplomatic breakthrough between the two nations in 50 years, Sollet decided he had to make his move, and fast. Rumors were stirring on the island that the priority treatment the United States has given undocumented Cuban immigrants since the 1960s - a welcoming embrace extended to no other nationality - could end with the onset of normalized relations.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Bill Cosby's defense team on Thursday accused Montgomery County prosecutors of playing "gotcha" with his rights by ignoring what they said was a valid, decade-old agreement not to charge him, even if it was never put in writing. The District Attorney's Office "cannot rely on the fact that the agreement was not reduced to writing as a basis for shirking its obligation," defense lawyer Brian McMonagle wrote in a filing that again urged a judge to throw out the sexual-assault case against Cosby.
SPORTS
April 26, 2015 | Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacob Hafer was in a hurry on Friday. He wanted to get the Berks Catholic 4x100 relay team off to a fast start in its race at the 121st Penn Relays. He also wanted to get back to the Reading area in time to prepare for his senior prom. Hafer has a busy life. A good life. A miraculous life. "Someone died so I could live," Hafer said in a stark and poignant description of his special place in this world as the recipient of a heart transplant. Hafer, a thoughtful 19-year-old, will be the first to say that every day is special for him. But some days are more special than others.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
WHY WOULD the United States decline to provide a serum that can cure Ebola to poor and desperate victims in several African nations where close to 1,000 people have died of the virus? Because it doesn't have such a serum. What the U.S. does have are a number of possible treatments for Ebola that are in the experimental stages. Most were developed with the help of federal financing after 9/11; drug companies previously had little financial incentive to develop drugs for an illness that affected relatively few people, all of them in developing countries.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER Philadelphia Traffic Court higher-up acknowledged yesterday that he now considers ticket-fixing to be wrong, but didn't previously because it was part of the everyday culture. "I didn't then" think it was wrong, testified Robert DeEmilio, who had worked as deputy court administrator in Traffic Court. Assistant U.S. Attorney Anthony Wzorek asked if "there were people who were more equal under the law" - people who received preferential treatment on a traffic ticket because they were connected to the judges.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AFTER A SIX-DAY break, the federal trial of six former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges and a Chinatown businessman accused of conspiring in a ticket-fixing scheme resumed yesterday. The morning's testimony centered on a ticket that was issued on Interstate 95 in Philadelphia to Diandra Salvatore, of Blackwood, Camden County. Salvatore was issued a ticket by a state trooper on Aug. 26, 2010, for allegedly speeding - driving 85 mph in a 55-mph zone. The ticket carried a fine of $247.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
SOON ENOUGH, people involved in a labor dispute will no longer be allowed to stalk, harass or threaten another person in the dispute with weapons of mass destruction. Currently, under the Pennsylvania crime code, such activities are permitted. House Bill 1154, sponsored by state Rep. Ron Miller, R-York, will remove the special carve-out for those involved in a labor dispute. It passed the House last month. Yesterday, a slightly amended version unanimously passed the Senate, 48-0.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WEARING JEANS, a tan pullover and white Nikes, a middle-age man sat silently in the audience of a federal courtroom yesterday and stared straight ahead. Occasionally, his face reddened and his lips pursed, as he appeared to fight back tears. Otherwise, he could've been anyone. But Dominic Verdi, 58, isn't just anyone. He's a former city official accused of using his office to extort business for a beer distributorship that he allegedly co-owns, and he's facing up to 140 years in prison and a $1.75 million maximum fine.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
A FEDERAL grand jury has charged former city official Dominic Verdi with seven counts of extortion, fraud and conspiracy for using his office to direct business to Chappy's Beer, Butts & Bets - a South Philadelphia beer distributor he co-owned. As deputy commissioner of the Department of Licenses & Inspections and a member of the Public Nuisance Task Force, Verdi, 58, allegedly orchestrated special treatment for bars and clubs that bought beer from Chappy's, according to an indictment from U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Columnist
Fittingly for a player who does a lot on the basketball court and makes it look easy - from running the point to jumping center, from blocking shots to making touch passes in midair, from hitting three-pointers to driving to the hoop - Alex Louin gets the star treatment at Mount St. Joseph. Some of her friends, numbering five to two or three dozen, support her during games. They sometimes have their faces painted, with "Alex" scrawled on their foreheads. They shout her name. They chant her Twitter handle, "How u Louin?"
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