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Spectacular Bid

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SPORTS
December 14, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
On the track, the decade began with Spectacular Bid's perfect tour of America in 1980. Some horses have had years as good. Few horses ever have been better than "the Bid" was in 1980. The decade ended with the wonderful finish of the 1989 Breeders' Cup Classic between Sunday Silence and Easy Goer. Sunday Silence won for the third time in four meetings, but both horses left their backers waiting for more in 1990. In between, the decade offered the wonderful spirit of John Henry, the rags-to-unheard-of-riches saga of Spend A Buck, the perfection of Personal Ensign and the elegance of Alysheba.
SPORTS
September 13, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
Craig Donnelly, who has been handicapping thoroughbred races in The Inquirer since 1971, when he was a senior at Radnor High School, has retired from the newspaper and will no longer be making selections. Over the years, Donnelly has picked the races at Garden State Park, Philadelphia Park, Atlantic City, Meadowlands, Liberty Bell Park, and Keystone. He once picked all eight races correctly at Delaware, and the most impressive horses he saw run in person were Spectacular Bid in 1979 and Afleet Alex in 2005.
SPORTS
May 4, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Trying to predict the winner of a horse race is a fool's game, and doing so for the Kentucky Derby - a jostling, 20-horse charge over a distance none of them has previously mastered - is a game for only the bravest of fools or the most foolish of the brave. Bill Handleman was my professor as I learned those hard lessons. He was a devoted addict of the calculus required for balancing the limits of a horse's pedigree, its will to run, the savvy of its trainer and jockey, the bias of a particular racetrack, the conditions of the day, the fickle nature of racing luck, and all of those factors as they were measured against the other horses in the race.
SPORTS
September 14, 1988 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Fate was after jockey Matt Vigliotti during the last week of February at Garden State. One night, he was thrown clear as his mount crashed though the outside rail. Then, he was tossed in a gate accident. Finally, he was dropped in the paddock Feb. 26. The third time was no charm. Vigliotti suffered a broken left thigh. Yesterday, 6 1/2 months after being injured, Vigliotti was back. The 30-year-old rider, who has won 977 races at Philadelphia Park (only Tony Black, Rick Wilson and Jake Nied have won more)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2004 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Jockey Stewart Elliott was sitting on a stool, wearing blue-and-white checks, half-reading a racing form in the shaded paddock at Monmouth Park Racetrack. It was just before the sixth race on a hot Sunday in Oceanport, N.J., and his next mount was about as far from Smarty Jones as one could imagine. It was St. Patrick's Day in July. If you wore green to the track, you got into the grandstand for free and heard a bagpipe band play songs like "You're a Grand Old Flag," not "My Old Kentucky Home," as Elliott heard at the Derby.
SPORTS
October 30, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
A race track press box is among the most cynical places on earth. A more- hardened bunch you will rarely see. Everything is scrutinized with skepticism. It is the very nature of the business. Truth and horse racing are not often synonymous. It's trying to get to the truth that makes the sport such a riddle. Very few of those in the press box don't back their opinions with cash. That, too, is the very nature of the game. And it leads to cynicism. What then to make of the polite applause that broke out a few minutes after 3 p.m. Saturday in the press box at Belmont Park.
SPORTS
August 3, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
When normal people near the age of 58, they contemplate retirement. Bill Shoemaker will be 58 on Aug. 19. And he is exactly six months away from retirement. But he definitely is not normal. Shoemaker, in the midst of a yearlong farewell tour around the world, brings his road show to Philadelphia Park tomorrow and Saturday. He will sign autographs, pose for pictures, give interviews and ride in at least four races on Saturday. (All for a casual $10,000 fee. This is, after all, still America.
SPORTS
April 20, 1987 | By DICK JERARDI, Daily News Sports Writer
The 2-year-old champion hasn't won the Kentucky Derby since Spectacular Bid in 1979. If nothing else is clear about this year's Kentucky Derby, it became evident Saturday that Capote, last year's 2-year-old champ, won't win it. After his weak effort in the Wood Memorial, there is some question if he should even be in it. But Capote is trained by Wayne Lukas, the man who has won everything - except the Derby. Lukas probably will be there May 2 - along with Capote, and perhaps as many as three other horses.
SPORTS
March 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Undefeated Declan's Moon is off the Kentucky Derby trail with a minor knee injury and won't return to horse racing for at least 5 months. Trainer Ron Ellis said yesterday that the injury - a hairline fracture to a bone that runs from the shoulder to the knee - was discovered several days after Declan's Moon won the Santa Catalina at Santa Anita last Saturday in his 3-year-old debut. The injury is not career-threatening, Ellis said in a phone interview from California, but "it looks like he's probably going to be out of training about 60 days, and we don't have 60 days to spare.
SPORTS
October 29, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call a sculptor. Get the monument started. Citation, Man o' War and that legendary crowd of racetrack warriors can expect company. A late-blooming 5-year-old horse named Cigar banged on the door of thoroughbred immortality at Belmont Park yesterday, winning the $3 million Breeders' Cup Classic in record time - and in the mud. His time over a track that had been soaked by 10 hours of rain was 1 minute, 59 2/5 seconds, a stakes record by a full...
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SPORTS
May 4, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Trying to predict the winner of a horse race is a fool's game, and doing so for the Kentucky Derby - a jostling, 20-horse charge over a distance none of them has previously mastered - is a game for only the bravest of fools or the most foolish of the brave. Bill Handleman was my professor as I learned those hard lessons. He was a devoted addict of the calculus required for balancing the limits of a horse's pedigree, its will to run, the savvy of its trainer and jockey, the bias of a particular racetrack, the conditions of the day, the fickle nature of racing luck, and all of those factors as they were measured against the other horses in the race.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012 | Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
I WAS WALKING walking out of Pimlico a few hours after an unforgettable Preakness when I spotted a few friends still taking about I'll Have Another's impossible rally past Bodemeister. Hall of Fame jockey Jerry Bailey was in the group. He said to me: "Did you think there was any way he was going to catch him?" My answer: "No, did you?" No, again.   That was the instant that clinched in my mind what my eyes had seen. When a horse does something you almost can't believe, that horse has gone into some other dimension and you better take him very seriously.
SPORTS
September 13, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
Craig Donnelly, who has been handicapping thoroughbred races in The Inquirer since 1971, when he was a senior at Radnor High School, has retired from the newspaper and will no longer be making selections. Over the years, Donnelly has picked the races at Garden State Park, Philadelphia Park, Atlantic City, Meadowlands, Liberty Bell Park, and Keystone. He once picked all eight races correctly at Delaware, and the most impressive horses he saw run in person were Spectacular Bid in 1979 and Afleet Alex in 2005.
SPORTS
May 6, 2007 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Several things that have not happened before, and a few that happen only rarely, came to pass in the 133d running of the Kentucky Derby yesterday, but in the end the most logical outcome of all carried the day - the best horse won. Street Sense, the winner of last year's Breeders' Cup Juvenile and a steady performer that had never finished out of the money in his seven previous races, bored a hole along the rail and came from far...
SPORTS
March 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Undefeated Declan's Moon is off the Kentucky Derby trail with a minor knee injury and won't return to horse racing for at least 5 months. Trainer Ron Ellis said yesterday that the injury - a hairline fracture to a bone that runs from the shoulder to the knee - was discovered several days after Declan's Moon won the Santa Catalina at Santa Anita last Saturday in his 3-year-old debut. The injury is not career-threatening, Ellis said in a phone interview from California, but "it looks like he's probably going to be out of training about 60 days, and we don't have 60 days to spare.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2004 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Jockey Stewart Elliott was sitting on a stool, wearing blue-and-white checks, half-reading a racing form in the shaded paddock at Monmouth Park Racetrack. It was just before the sixth race on a hot Sunday in Oceanport, N.J., and his next mount was about as far from Smarty Jones as one could imagine. It was St. Patrick's Day in July. If you wore green to the track, you got into the grandstand for free and heard a bagpipe band play songs like "You're a Grand Old Flag," not "My Old Kentucky Home," as Elliott heard at the Derby.
SPORTS
June 2, 2004 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
WHAT'S next? If Smarty Jones wins the Belmont on Saturday, becoming the second undefeated horse to win the Triple Crown, becoming the leading money winner in the whole cockeyed history of horse racing, how long will it take someone in the media mob to ask trainer John Servis, "What's next?" In Vegas, the over-under is 48 seconds. "If this horse wins the Belmont," Servis said the other day, "I will probably break down and cry . . . just taking it all in . . . because I haven't been able to enjoy the [Kentucky]
SPORTS
May 27, 2004 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
BOB LEVY thinks Smarty Jones will win the Belmont and earn that $5 million bonus that goes to a Triple Crown winner. "He's the best horse," Levy gushes. "He's the most athletic horse. He's the fastest horse. None of the horses that have run with him can beat him. " And then he pauses, sighs, and adds a racing disclaimer that goes back to Man o' War. Maybe further. "Unless something happens," he whispers. "There is no sure thing in racing. I had a horse five [lengths] in front at the eighth pole.
SPORTS
June 3, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Roman, the thoroughbred breeding consultant and Ph.D oil industry executive from Houston, hates to spoil the Triple Crown party this weekend for Charismatic at Belmont Park. But his figures show that the big red locomotive from California simply does not belong with the 11 Triple Crown immortals he seeks to join. Sorry, but he will be stopped on the threshold of greatness the way 14 other Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winners were. At least, that's what Roman's research tells him, and the controversial breeding consultant and dosage advocate from Houston has done a lot of it. His advice: Save your money.
SPORTS
June 3, 1997 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Compose a list of the 20 greatest horses in American racing history and there would be a place for Buckpasser, Cigar, Damascus, Dr. Fager, Easy Goer, Forego, John Henry, Kelso, Man o' War, Nashua, Native Dancer, Spectacular Bid and Sunday Silence. None won the Triple Crown. Some just weren't ready for that five-week crucible as 3-year-olds, and made their marks later. Seven tried and failed to win the three races at three race tracks at three different distances over those 35 days in May and June.
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