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Speed Limit

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NEWS
April 18, 1989 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak wants a federal judge to invalidate the 39-m.p.h. speed limit set by Pennsauken on trains passing through the township. The National Railroad Passenger Corp., which operates Amtrak, sued the township Friday, arguing that federal regulations regarding train speeds supersede any state or local laws. Concerned about public safety in the wake of plans to build the so-called Gamblers' Express train line between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, Pennsauken passed an ordinance on Oct. 27, 1986, imposing the 39-m.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
In response to residents' complaints that the 35 mile-per-hour speed limit on Primos Avenue is too high, the Glenolden Borough Council has endorsed a proposal to lower the limit to 25 miles per hour. The council's action at its caucus Tuesday night was prompted by a letter sent by state Rep. Ronald Raymond (R., Delaware) stating that several residents of both Glenolden and Folcroft had told him that the road was dangerous with a 35 mile-per-hour limit. According to council president Thomas Connery, the Folcroft Borough Council has agreed to write a letter to the state Department of Transportation urging it to lower the speed limit on Primos Avenue, which is on the boundary shared by Folcroft and Glenolden.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
The speed limit on the Primos Avenue Bridge that runs between Folcroft and Glenolden will remain at 35 m.p.h. despite efforts by the two boroughs to have it lowered. At the Folcroft Borough Council meeting Monday night, Councilman Thomas Coletti, chairman of the Highway Committee, announced that PennDOT had conducted an engineering and traffic study on Primos Avenue and decided not to lower the speed limit. In a letter sent to both boroughs, PennDOT district traffic engineer Douglas May said, "The results of the study indicated that a reduction of the speed limit is not warranted.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
The Newtown Township Board of Supervisors has accepted the offer of three Saw Mill Road residents who have volunteered their driveways for use by police in conducting a traffic survey. Several residents of Saw Mill and connecting roads presented a petition to the board Monday night, asking for its help in reducing the speed limit on Saw Mill Road to 25 m.p.h. from the current 35 m.p.h. and in installing stop signs at five connecting roads. Cynthia O'Donnell, a Saw Mill Road resident who circulated the petition, told the board that increased traffic and speeding traffic, particularly around curves in the road, posed a danger to those living nearby and to pedestrians using the road.
NEWS
March 20, 1987
The 55-mile-per-hour speed limit was adopted in the midst of the energy crisis to save fuel. It has survived into the oil-glut era because it also saves lives. The problem is that people no longer obey it and police rarely enforce it. Interstate highways were designed to be driven at speeds as fast as 70 m.p.h. and even the most law-abiding people find that they whisk along the highways at illegal speeds without feeling any sense of guilt or peril. If the 55-m.p.h. limit now seems questionable to residents of the highly urbanized Northeast corridor, you can imagine how popular it is in Montana or West Texas or any of those other places where people drive 90 miles for dinner and a movie.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Another Uwchlan neighborhood wants lower speed limits. John Mesher, who lives in the Charter Oaks development, gave the township supervisors a petition with 112 signatures asking that the proposed 30-m.p.h. speed limit be reduced to 25 m.p.h. because of safety concerns. Mesher said that there were about 175 children under age 12 in the development of about 120 houses, and that they were likely to play in the street because of small, steep yards. "We hear you, and we'll do whatever we can to help," said C. Ward Braceland, supervisors chairman, at the meeting Monday.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
Re: Inaccurate Radar Guns. Pennsylvania has not set or enforced posted speed limits for safety reasons for a long time. The establishment sees the enforcement program as a revenue generator, not a safety program. Any police department that found out many of its tickets were questionable due to faulty equipment would voluntarily dismiss them, and request the court to refund fines already collected. That would be the honorable thing to do, but it was not done. If the program was really about safety, then that would be the mindset of everyone connected.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
Pass Buzby's General Store, the Harmony Gun Club, the municipal office- trailer, scattered homesteads and poof! in a swirl of Pine Barren's dust, you are out of Chatsworth - a man-made variation in the wild blur of evergreen and sand along Route 563. Summer people drive this road to get to Bass River State Park - fast. Resident Charles Robinson knows. From his front porch he has seen cars fly across the tiny bridge that marks the entrance to Chatsworth. From a spot in the town's core he has used a radar detector to clock vehicles bolting through.
SPORTS
October 12, 1986 | By Brian MacQuarrie, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a battle brewing on the upper Delaware River between powerboaters and the National Park Service. At issue is a proposed 5 m.p.h. speed limit on all boating along 37 miles of the river below the Delaware Water Gap. The park service wants it, but arrayed in opposition are several vocal boating groups. Park rangers see a clear-cut safety problem in the narrow waterway that meanders through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Boaters see a bureaucratic menace and argue that a 5 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
Traffic, water and sewer issues, chemical spills and zoning were among the issues addressed Monday by the Warwick supervisors in a meeting that lasted more than three hours. A traffic ordinance lowering the speed limit on Guinea Lane from 35 m.p.h. to 25 m.p.h. was adopted in a 2-1 vote. Supervisor Arthur L. Pease 3d, who lives on Guinea Lane, voted against it. He did not agree with the other supervisors that the higher speed on the two-lane road separating Warwick and Warrington Townships was a safety concern.
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NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Columnist
Francesca and I just returned from a book tour, driving to bookstores in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. It was wonderful to meet our readers, and the only downside of the tour was the fault of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Let me explain. Loyal readers know I'm not the bravest driver in the world, especially when I'm crossing the Bay Bridge in Maryland. In fact, Francesca drove us over the bridge while I was in the passenger seat, driving myself over the deep end. I would like to meet the person who designed the Bay Bridge, which zooms straight up into the clouds, veers left at a seagull, reaches heaven, and then plunges back down again, barely skimming the top of the briny deep.
NEWS
February 21, 2016
A Bucks County woman who killed a cyclist while driving drunk last summer was sentenced Friday to 4 1/2 to 13 years in state prison. Wendy Kristen Hawkes, 34, of Ottsville pleaded guilty to charges including homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence, the Bucks County District Attorney's Office said Friday. Hawkes hit Daniel Wilson, 45, of Ottsville as he was riding his bicycle down Ervin Road in Tinicum Township on July 9. She was going 17 mph over the speed limit and had a blood alcohol content of 0.29 percent, said Assistant District Attorney Gregg Shore.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Federal investigators will open a new window into the deadly Amtrak Train 188 derailment in Philadelphia when they release a trove of documents Monday, including interview transcripts with the engineer. Those interviews could provide the most detailed view yet of Brandon Bostian, the engineer running the train in May when it sped to 106 m.p.h. - more than twice the speed limit for an approaching curve - before hurtling off the tracks in Frankford Junction, killing eight and injuring more than 200. Bostian's lawyer has said the engineer does not remember the crash.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Hoverboards were among the most in-demand gifts this past holiday season. But the motorized skateboards also have been cause for alarm. For one thing, they're known to burst into flames. In light of those cases, and scores of reported injuries from falls off them, a member of Philadelphia City Council plans to introduce legislation Thursday that would slap adults with a $25 fine if children in their care use the boards without helmets, knee and elbow pads, and wrist guards. "People underestimate the dangers," said Michael Rivlin, a hand-and-arm specialist at the Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IN WHAT MAY have been a tragic aftermath to the Made in America festival, two 25-year-olds were killed early yesterday by a taxicab near City Hall. Police say Amanda DiGirolomo, of Phoenixville, and Bryan Botti, of Baltimore - reportedly in town for the concert - were struck by a cab heading north on Broad Street near Arch after 4:30 a.m. Witnesses told investigators that the cab appeared to be traveling at about 50 mph, but police were not able to confirm that estimation yesterday.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mother of a 10-year-old Gloucester County boy struck and killed by a speeding police car in late December has filed a lawsuit against the county, Franklin Township, the police officer involved, and the New Jersey Department of Transportation. Attorneys for Michelle Harding of Franklin filed the suit Friday in federal court in Camden, alleging wrongful death and contending that a number of agencies acted negligently, effectively contributing to the accident. Harding had made known her intention to sue in the wake of her son's Dec. 28 death.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
FORMER Philadelphia Police Sgt. Thomas Winkis said he hoped David Farries' relatives could find some peace. "I'm truly sorry for the loss of Mr. Farries to his family," Winkis said in court. "I truly hope my actions today bring some closure to them. " That hope was expressed yesterday morning when Winkis, 46, pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter, DUI and reckless endangerment for slamming his Dodge Challenger into Farries' Ford Econoline van in 2013 in Holmesburg. The high-speed crash at State Road and Ashburner Street threw Farries, 55, from his van. He died three days later.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The engineer of Amtrak Train 188 was not talking or texting on his cellphone before the train's deadly derailment at Frankford Junction on May 12, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The finding supported statements by the lawyer for engineer Brandon Bostian that the engineer's cellphone was turned off and stowed in his bag during the trip. However, NTSB vice chair Tho "Bella" Dinh-Zarr told a Senate committee Wednesday that investigators have not determined whether the engineer was using an app or the phone for other purposes.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its latest response to the deadly May 12 Amtrak wreck at Frankford Junction in Philadelphia, the Federal Railroad Administration urged passenger railroads to better control train speed approaching tight curves and bridges. The safety advisory on Tuesday recommended that railroads identify locations where the speed limit drops by more than 20 m.p.h. entering the curve or bridge. Railroads should install automatic-braking circuitry at those locations to slow trains if the engineer doesn't, the FRA said.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans plan to press Amtrak officials Tuesday on why the rail line did not move faster to install safety upgrades that could have stopped Train 188 before it derailed last month in Philadelphia. Among the key questions expected at a morning hearing on Capitol Hill - the first since the incident that killed eight passengers - are why Amtrak did not devote more resources to activate a new-age safety system, and why an older safety system was only in place on the southbound side of the curve in Port Richmond, and not the northbound side, where the train left the tracks.
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