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Spelling Bee

NEWS
April 2, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Local spelling champ Matthew Malloy admitted that most of the words he learned to spell will never come up in conversation. "Some words, I don't know when I could ever use them," said 13-year-old Matthew, who beat 29 other spelling bee contenders Saturday to win the 1990 Greater Philadelphia Regional Spelling Bee, sponsored by the Daily News. The seventh-grader at St. Cecilia's School in Northeast Philadelphia learned to spell words like "argillaceous," meaning "of, relating to, or containing clay or clay minerals," and "polydactyly," the bonecrusher that eliminated second-place winner 11-year-old Judy Chao of Doylestown.
NEWS
May 28, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Drew Alvarez, an eighth grader from Germantown, Tenn., cannot speak, but that does not keep him from spelling. With the aid of a modified electronic dictionary developed by Burlington Township-based Franklin Electronic Publishers, Drew, 14, took off for the 71st annual Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee in Washington, which began yesterday and was scheduled to end today. He used the handheld device, which he calls "Frankie," to spell out words, as he did to win the mid-South regional spelling competition and advance to the finals.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | From MICHAEL LACING and LEON CZIKOWSKY
FAIR IS FAIR Fay Vincent realigned four teams in the National League, saying it was in the best interest of baseball. To make things even fairer, he announced that he's studying the possibility of allowing the Phillies four outs an inning. NAME GAME Republican leaders had mixed reaction to the naming of Sen. Al Gore as Democratic candidate for vice president. Although his name is short and should pose no real problem if Dan Quayle was asked to spell it, it does have a tricky "e. " BAD JUDGMENT A report out of L.A. says that Daryl Gates had a secret police force that spied on celebrities like Robert Redford, Connie Chung and Tommy LaSorda.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Colonial Middle School sixth-grader Matthew Goldich gobbled up tortilla and recovered from beriberi. He skewered brochette, trod over whorlywort (a coiled plant root) and didn't blush at miniaceous (a reddish color). If dorsiferous hadn't been such as backbreaker, Goldich might have been one of the youngest entrants in the national spelling bee in Washington next month. Instead, Goldich came in second in a regional semifinal competition held Friday at Norristown High School that was won by eighth-grader Jayatri Das of Upper Merion Middle School.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By Peter Mucha and Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A home-schooled Chester County eighth grader is one of 45 National Spelling Bee contestants who will compete in today's nationally broadcast semifinals - and possibly tonight's prime-time finals. Meghan Reynolds, 14, of Landenberg, spelled duende correctly in the fourth and last of yesterday's preliminary rounds of the 81st annual bee in Washington to qualify for today's competition. Duende means the power to attract through personal magnetism and charm, according to Merriam-Webster online.
NEWS
March 30, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How do you spell irresistible? Another iridescent tile in the spelling-bee-as-metaphor-of-America mosaic, Akeelah and the Bee is an endearing inspirational of an 11-year-old abecedarian from South Central Los Angeles who wins her middle-school contest and can't imagine that she'll advance to the regionals, let alone the nationals, of what might be called the Orthographic Olympics. Imagine The Karate Kid hooking up with Boyz N the Hood and spawning Girlz and the Word. As Akeelah Anderson, the underachiever fearful of being branded a brainiac by sister seventh graders, Keke Palmer soars, carrying writer/director Doug Atchison's film on new 'tween wings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How do you spell irresistible? Another iridescent tile in the spelling-bee-as-metaphor-of-America mosaic, Akeelah and the Bee is an endearing, inspirational tale of an 11-year-old abecedarian from South Central Los Angeles who wins her middle-school contest and can't imagine that she'll advance to the regionals, let alone the nationals, of what might be called the Orthographic Olympics. Imagine The Karate Kid hooking up with Boyz N the Hood and spawning Girlz and the Word.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In this equestrian competition, youths don't have to worry about warming up their horses or making them jump. But they do need to know how to warm them up, and the maximum height a horse can jump. Youngsters and young adults study these fine points and others to prepare for the so-called "Know-Down" quizzing competitions, sponsored by a national equestrian organization. Members of the Radnor Hunt Pony Club, made up of children and young adults up to age 21, clinched victories this month in a regional Know-Down competition that had participants from a dozen other pony clubs.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The stakes were high for the 10 participants in the spelling bee at the police substation in Delsea Estates, with the teams, the Angels and the Eliminators, battling for the ultimate prize - a pizza party. With his team down by three points, Brian Marshall, 12, of the Eliminators, was up against Sheronda Smith, 11, of the Angels. The word: century. Brian's guess, "centery," gave Sheronda the floor. She spelled it correctly, and the Angels took the point. The Eliminators, in Brian's words, "got eliminated.
NEWS
August 4, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a rook! Instead of fireworks last night on Jon & Kate Plus 8, you got all the excitement of a spelling bee. The show was returning after a long hiatus that was engendered by the couple's breathlessly reported decision to separate. The expectation was that the new episodes would delve into the bitter unraveling of the Gosselins' marriage, the fairy-tale-gone-sour scenario that has made them tabloid staples. But in back-to-back episodes, we hardly saw Jon and Kate together.
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