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NEWS
May 31, 1996 | by Jack McGuire, Marianne Costantinou and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
DNA tests have determined that semen found in the office of Kevin Murray, a court administrator who killed himself after a woman accused him of forcing her to perform oral sex there, was not Murray's, according to police sources. Murray, 42, the father of five, shot himself to death in a city-owned car in a Center City parking garage Jan. 25. The woman, Kathleen Zwaan, 24, has since filed a $10 million civil rights suit, claiming that shortly after Murray's suicide, Municipal Court officials fired her from her $80,000-a-year job with the court's protection from abuse unit.
NEWS
June 18, 2001 | MICHELLE MALKIN
MILO JACOB Manheim didn't celebrate Father's Day this weekend. Like a growing number of celebrity babies, 3-month-old Milo doesn't have a dad in his life - and that's exactly the way his biological mother wants it. Chalk up another victim of Hollywood's twisted family values. Actress Camryn Manheim, an outspoken liberal, is publicly defiant about her decision to be an unmarried single mother by choice. "There is no father," she tells reporters who request the identity of Milo's other parent.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
More women are seeking to be artificially inseminated with dead men's sperm, University of Pennsylvania researchers have found. For over a decade, the post-mortem insemination has been done only when men give their consent before they die. But in the last few years, requests for sperm extraction from men who did not give prior consent have increased signficantly, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Urology....
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wilmington City Council has gone on record urging the U.S. and Delaware governments to confer the "rights of personhood" on each and every human sperm. In a resolution, the council declared: "Laws should be enacted by all legislative bodies in the United States to promote equal representation, and should potentially include laws in defense of 'personhood,' forbidding every man from destroying his semen. " The resolution passed, 8-4, Thursday night. Loretta Walsh, the councilwoman who introduced the resolution, told the Wilmington News Journal: "What's good for the gander is good for the goose.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My oldest son came to me nine months ago asking my opinion. He wanted to donate sperm to a black lesbian couple (for a fee) so they could have a biracial child. He told me he needed the money. I told him I didn't approve because they were lesbians. (Sorry, I'll be bashed for that statement, but I have to be honest.) I have a biracial 10-year-old son, so race isn't the issue. Had it been a heterosexual couple of any race, I would have been OK. However, what I told him was that if he gave up his rights to the child, I, too, wouldn't have grandparents' rights.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The testimony of two experts about sperm found on slain jogger Kimberly Ernest may have added new levels of confusion for jurors considering the case against her two accused killers. The confusion arises because tears around the victim's vagina makes it appear that Ernest was raped, but the only sperm found was in her rectum. DNA testing showed it matches neither defendant Herbert Haak nor Richard Wise. The defense claims the sperm was left by the real killer. The prosecution contends it came from consensual sex prior to the murder.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It seemed a bizarre request: Pam Maresca, 22, wanted doctors to extract sperm from her husband hours after he had died in a car crash. The Florida woman thought perhaps she could keep part of him alive by having his baby. Today, his sperm remain frozen in a sperm bank while she decides what to do, and a new medical-legal controversy brews over the extraction of sperm from the recently dead. The practice, done at the request of loved ones, has become surprisingly common, according to a survey by University of Pennsylvania medical ethicist Arthur Caplan.
NEWS
July 27, 2010 | By Emily Fuggetta, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Devon Wolfkiel knows her father is a thin man with hazel eyes and wavy brown hair - but she may never know his name. Wolfkiel, 20, a New York University student, was conceived with sperm from Penn State's Milton S. Hershey Clinic through artificial insemination. After graduating from high school, she found a paper in her parents' room with information, but nothing she could use to identify her donor. She said her search is not urgent, but in her late teens, when she began to feel a sense of medical responsibility for herself, she decided to try to find her donor's medical information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My oldest son came to me nine months ago asking my opinion. He wanted to donate sperm to a black lesbian couple (for a fee) so they could have a biracial child. He told me he needed the money. I told him I didn't approve because they were lesbians. (Sorry, I'll be bashed for that statement, but I have to be honest.) I have a biracial 10-year-old son, so race isn't the issue. Had it been a heterosexual couple of any race, I would have been OK. However, what I told him was that if he gave up his rights to the child, I, too, wouldn't have grandparents' rights.
NEWS
March 18, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have a 19-month-old son and plan on trying for another baby soon. My husband's brother, who is sterile, called and asked my husband to donate sperm to him. I am very upset because my husband refuses to ask his brother to make any kind of compromises to protect our family and theirs, such as counseling to resolve any issues ahead of time. Before we were serious about each other, my husband donated to his brother's first wife. His brother wanted to keep it a secret from everyone - including the children - but his wife told all of her friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
All her life, Tiffany had trained herself to perform: back handsprings when she was a young gymnast, dance routines in musical theater, knee-hangs on aerial trapeze as an adult. And when it was time to get pregnant, she and Bets planned for more than a year. They signed a contract with the friend who agreed to donate sperm. They waited while a local cryobank screened and froze that sperm for a mandatory six-month quarantine. Tiffany began charting her basal temperatures. So why, month after month, was her body failing at the thing she wanted most?
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JOHN CORRIGAN, For the Daily News
REGINA Turner keeps pager, cellphone and surgical scrubs next to her bed in case the baby comes in the middle of the night. But rather than wait for water to break, she's looking for milk to drip from an udder. After all, My Special Girl is expected to deliver her foal within the next couple of weeks. And you can watch, right now through the live birth, via the new "foal cam" on the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's website, vet.upenn.edu/FoalCam. "We get requests to see what goes on behind the scenes all the time," said Turner, a vet and an associate professor of large-animal reproduction at the Georgia and Philip Hofmann Research Center for Animal Reproduction, at Penn's New Bolton Center.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Being just a kid himself, 7-year-old Sam Hornikel isn't concerned about his ability to have children of his own yet. He's thinking more about the soccer game he missed, or his math homework. But researchers around the world are working to give boys like Sam - who fought off cancer when he was only 3 years old - the opportunity to have their own family one day. Often, chemotherapy or radiation treatments can harm fertility. Typically, older patients can bank sperm, but for those who haven't gone through puberty yet, researchers are deep-freezing tiny pieces of their testicular tissue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
The first time Andrew Botwin said "Daddy," his mother gulped. Was this the moment Shari Botwin had anguished about ever since deciding, at age 38, to have a baby on her own? Was this the time to begin explaining about "choice mommies" and "donor daddies"? But Andrew didn't seem worried, Botwin recalled. He wasn't asking a question. He was trying out the new word with a 2-year-old's exuberance, the same way he yelps "Dora!" while watching television or "broccoli!" when naming his favorite foods.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
Just in case you needed another reason to be nice to Dad today: New research out of the University of Pennsylvania's medical and veterinary schools found stressful experiences can be transferred to sperm, increasing the odds that offspring will have blunted responses to stress. That, in turn, is known to be linked to anxiety and depression. OK, it's a mouse study. But the findings, according to the research last month in the Journal of Neuroscience , are the first to show an epigenetic link - a genetic change caused by outside influences - to stress-related diseases passed from father to child.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Eric Tucker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The roadside bomb that exploded outside Andrew Robinson's humvee in Iraq six years ago broke the Marine staff sergeant's neck and left him without use of his legs. It also cast doubt on his ability to father a child, a gnawing emotional wound for a then-23-year-old who had planned to start a family with his wife of less than two years. The catastrophic spinal cord injury meant the couple's best hope for children was in vitro fertilization, an expensive and time-consuming medical procedure whose cost isn't covered by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I had a major heart attack about two years ago. My cardiologist says my heart pumps only half as well as a healthy heart. I'm on a number of heart medications, but can you tell me whether anyone is studying a way to restore a weak heart like mine to the way it was? Answer: A heart attack is the permanent damage and death of heart muscle resulting from a blockage to the blood vessel supplying that area. Once an area of tissue is dead, it forms a permanent scar and is gone for good - or so we've always thought.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wilmington City Council has gone on record urging the U.S. and Delaware governments to confer the "rights of personhood" on each and every human sperm. In a resolution, the council declared: "Laws should be enacted by all legislative bodies in the United States to promote equal representation, and should potentially include laws in defense of 'personhood,' forbidding every man from destroying his semen. " The resolution passed, 8-4, Thursday night. Loretta Walsh, the councilwoman who introduced the resolution, told the Wilmington News Journal: "What's good for the gander is good for the goose.
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