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Sperm Bank

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NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mention the answering machine and Wendy Cohen scowls. Of all the chores her business demands, checking that blamed contraption is the one that drives her nuts. Some days, it seems every moron in town awaits her on the overnight tape. It goes with the territory. Cohen runs a sperm bank. And not just any sperm bank. Her company, Pennsylvania Sperm Bank Inc., is the only commercial sperm bank in Pennsylvania. Her customers, therefore, show up from as far as Pittsburgh. And though the sperm bank no longer advertises, its Mayfair address and phone number are right there in Ma Bell's White Pages.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Larry Hackett, New York Daily News
"I like myself," says Sam, a 20-year-old college student. "I think there should be more people like me. " So, apparently, do the folks at Sam's sperm bank, where the business major from upstate New York has been making deposits since October. Sam doesn't know whether anyone has become pregnant, but the sperm bank wouldn't pay, he imagines, "unless they could sell every single sample. " The recent controversy over whether a Queens woman was inseminated with the wrong semen from a Manhattan sperm bank has refocused attention on sperm donation and artificial insemination, a procedure that has produced well above 30,000 births in the U.S., according to government statistics.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | by David Kronke, Los Angeles Daily News
Calling "Frozen Assets" moronic discredits morons. The only surprise in this hapless, hopelessly contrived romantic comedy is that "name" actors such as Corbin Bernsen and Shelley Long (OK, they're not great names, but they are "names") agreed to appear in what otherwise would have been an awful but anonymous straight-to-video release. Bernsen stars as Zach, a corporate zombie dispatched by his boss to a tiny town in Oregon, where the only hotel is - get this - a brothel. He's assigned to shore up a failing bank in a tiny Oregon town; what he doesn't know is that it's - get this - a sperm bank.
NEWS
January 10, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blood tests were negative for all 290 women who showed up to be tested for signs of AIDS after Pennsylvania Hospital announced that AIDS antibodies had been detected in the blood of a sperm bank donor and in blood serum used in its in-vitro fertilization laboratory. An additional 311 women who had been notified of possible exposure to the AIDS virus did not taken part in the screening, said Dolores Ziff, hospital spokeswoman. A total of 601 women had been contacted after the hospital found antibodies to the AIDS virus in two unrelated cases: in the blood of a man who had been a regular donor for about 2 1/2 years to the hospital's sperm bank and in a batch of blood serum used in the hospital's in-vitro fertilization laboratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A man who has recently escaped from a mental hospital peers into a microscope and cackles at the sight of intensely magnified sperm. . . . Unfortunately, a Hollywood executive who is demonstrably more unhinged than the fugitive patient also thought this was funny, and the awful result is a stillborn comedy called Frozen Assets. We live in the era of high concept and lowered expectations, when the latest Steven Seagal outing is pitched as "Die Hard on a battleship. " I assume it was after a lunch that was unfashionably heavy on the martinis that producer and writer Don Klein proposed "Yuppie takes over a sperm bank" and found some gullible takers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Kaysaree Salgado, 24, and Brenda Huertas, 33, of Port Richmond THE CHILD: Zoe Rae Huertas Salgado, born April 25, 2016 HOW KAYSAREE FED THE BABY WHEN SHE HAD TROUBLE LATCHING: She expressed milk into a medicine cup, then used a syringe. Kaysaree was a dimpled 22-year-old with a self-described "old soul. " Brenda was a tattooed "bad girl" with a rock-solid work ethic. They met online, through PlentyOfFish.com, and called their first meeting a "puppy date" - Kaysaree with her miniature pinscher, Prince, and Brenda with her pit bull, Charli.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING BORROWED Victoria Ingram-Curlee has finally made good on her wedding promise to her husband. In two 2 1/2-hour operations in San Diego on Wednesday, four doctors removed one of her kidneys and implanted it in Randall Curlee. "The operations, both of them, were quite successful," said Dr. Robert Mendez. Husband and wife were recuperating yesterday in separate rooms at Sharp Memorial Hospital, where they were married Oct. 11. They should be able to go home as early as next week, doctors said.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Conrad Weniger says he made a secret sex deal with his former paramour. Weniger said he agreed to help Susan Kesler have a child only after she promised not to ask him to support it. She sued him after the baby boy arrived. When Weniger was ordered to provide financial support to the child by a Crawford County judge, he appealed. Last week, the state Superior Court ruled against Weniger. Judge Michael Eakin said Weniger should not consider himself a mere sperm donor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Kids were always part of the picture. Rowan and Tyler are the oldest in their families; both worked their way through college by babysitting and being nannies. And when they met, at a party in New York that neither really wanted to attend, a mutual enthusiasm for children was part of the spark. "Our eyes met, and I thought: I'm going to hang out with that person," Rowan recalls. Their chat lasted five hours - long enough for the pair to leave the party and head back to Tyler's place in Brooklyn, with Rowan's bike on board; later that night, Rowan cycled all the way back home to Harlem.
NEWS
September 4, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have three children. Before we were married, we discussed that I wanted a big family. He said he didn't want kids at all. This didn't bother me because I had been told I would never be able to have children. We ended up not only having one "surprise" baby, but three. My dilemma is I desperately want to have more children. My husband has not only said no - he's said HELL no, over his dead body. Then he got a vasectomy. I feel I'm between a rock and a hard place.
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NEWS
September 4, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have three children. Before we were married, we discussed that I wanted a big family. He said he didn't want kids at all. This didn't bother me because I had been told I would never be able to have children. We ended up not only having one "surprise" baby, but three. My dilemma is I desperately want to have more children. My husband has not only said no - he's said HELL no, over his dead body. Then he got a vasectomy. I feel I'm between a rock and a hard place.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Kaysaree Salgado, 24, and Brenda Huertas, 33, of Port Richmond THE CHILD: Zoe Rae Huertas Salgado, born April 25, 2016 HOW KAYSAREE FED THE BABY WHEN SHE HAD TROUBLE LATCHING: She expressed milk into a medicine cup, then used a syringe. Kaysaree was a dimpled 22-year-old with a self-described "old soul. " Brenda was a tattooed "bad girl" with a rock-solid work ethic. They met online, through PlentyOfFish.com, and called their first meeting a "puppy date" - Kaysaree with her miniature pinscher, Prince, and Brenda with her pit bull, Charli.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, for The Inquirer
THE PARENTS: Laura Jennings, 31, and Jen Jennings, 35, of Phoenixville THE CHILD: Joss Lynne Jennings, born March 16, 2016 HOW THEY CHOSE THE BABY'S NAME: They wanted a gender-neutral name that would work for a boy or a girl; plus, they liked that the child could be called "JJ. " It doesn't look like a mixed marriage. But for Jen, raised Catholic in Bucks County, and Laura, who grew up in central Pennsylvania as the only child of evangelical parents, differences surfaced from the start: Laura chattered when she was nervous; Jen grew quiet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Kids were always part of the picture. Rowan and Tyler are the oldest in their families; both worked their way through college by babysitting and being nannies. And when they met, at a party in New York that neither really wanted to attend, a mutual enthusiasm for children was part of the spark. "Our eyes met, and I thought: I'm going to hang out with that person," Rowan recalls. Their chat lasted five hours - long enough for the pair to leave the party and head back to Tyler's place in Brooklyn, with Rowan's bike on board; later that night, Rowan cycled all the way back home to Harlem.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Each woman thought she was being stood up. While Pam fidgeted at Tria Cafe on South 18th Street, Sam sat restlessly at Tria's Spruce Street location - without her phone, because she thought it was rude to bring one on a first date. It took 45 minutes to resolve the glitch. But there were no hard feelings; as recent transplants to Philadelphia - Sam from Kentucky and Pam from Buffalo - they understood the challenge of fumbling around a new city. Soon, they were exploring together - the Christmas lights at Longwood Gardens, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the restaurants of the "gayborhood.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY ROGER MOORE, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
"STARBUCK" is a big, fat French-Canadian hug of a movie, a sperm-donations-gone-wrong farce that manages the occasional belly laugh, but also offers moving takes on parenthood, family and what it means to grow up. David Wozniak (Patrick Huard) makes one wonder what the French word for "galoot" is. He's the black sheep in his Montreal family, a thirty-something slacker who can't do the easiest job in the family's butcher shop right - driving the delivery truck. He's forever taking the truck for personal errands, forgetting to do this or that and then lying the moment he's found out. He's in hock to loan sharks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Jake Coyle, Associated Press
The Babymakers is the kind of comedy that makes you appreciate Judd Apatow all the more. This is what happens when emotion and character are sacrificed for jokes, when set pieces are preferred over narrative, when a movie is just a collection of so-so gags. The Babymakers isn't exactly an official Broken Lizard comedy ( Super Troopers , Beerfest ), but it bears the comedy troupe's hallmarks of goofy gratuity and good-natured slapstick. It's directed by the group's Jay Chadrasekhar (he also appears as a former Indian mobster)
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Conrad Weniger says he made a secret sex deal with his former paramour. Weniger said he agreed to help Susan Kesler have a child only after she promised not to ask him to support it. She sued him after the baby boy arrived. When Weniger was ordered to provide financial support to the child by a Crawford County judge, he appealed. Last week, the state Superior Court ruled against Weniger. Judge Michael Eakin said Weniger should not consider himself a mere sperm donor.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
A good man isn't hard to find. You just have to know where to look. Sperm bank catalogs. The GQ for the y-chromosome. These days, more and more women intent on getting pregnant with Mr. Right - or just borrowing some of his DNA - are letting their fingers do the walking through sperm bank listings of donors, effectively taking the mate out of mating. Channel 10 news anchor Renee Chenault is just one high-profile example of a professional woman who chose single motherhood through the science of artificial insemination.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Mark Angeles and April Adamson Daily News Staff Writers
You're a woman between the ages of 35 and 45 and you're a high-profile exec. You work 80-hour weeks and don't have time to cook your own dinner, let alone find the man of your dreams. But your biological clock is ticking away. So you head to your local fertility specialist to be artificially inseminated. Nearly 100,000 working women- turned-single moms choose this route each year, women who want children but feel they'll never find Mr. Right in time. "They feel that if they wait too long, they won't have children," said Dr. Jeffrey Steinberg, of the Fertility Institutes in Beverly Hills.
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