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NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Joseph Sobanko's patients often ask him which sunscreen is best. That's especially true this time of year, when people are going outside and the sun's rays are at their brightest - and most damaging. Whether the patient is blond or dark, freckled or fair, the Penn Medicine skin-cancer specialist has the same answer: Whichever sunscreen you'll actually use. Far too few of us do, he says. About one in five Americans will develop skin cancer - the most common kind of cancer - in their lifetimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1986 | Special to the Daily News
In 1978, the Food and Drug Administration recommended the use of sun protection factor numbers on sun lotions that contained sunscreens. To use the numbers, multiply the number of minutes it usually takes you to burn by the SPF number to get the length of time you can safely stay out in the sun. An SPF of 15 allows no sun penetration (some products carry numbers as high as 30, but the FDA doesn't sanction them). The FDA has also developed a list of six skin types for use in determining which SPF is right for you. Skin Type 1 burns easily and never tans.
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to make sunscreen products less confusing, the Food and Drug Administration has issued new rules for testing and labeling them. So far, confusion is growing. Several major news outlets inaccurately reported that the FDA is nixing the "sun protection factor" (SPF) on labels in favor of three categories of protection: minimum, moderate or high. In fact, the FDA says, the categories are optional. The SPF number, which indicates protection from sunburning rays, primarily ultraviolet B (UVB)
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services, Vogue magazine and USA Today contributed to this report
DIRECT YOUR FEET TO THE SHADY SIDE OF THE STREET: Dust off your sunscreens. It's getting to be that melanoma time of year again. Some fun facts about anti-ray goo: Most people don't put enough on. When in doubt, slather. The thin layer of slime you'd use with, say, a skin moisturizer is only about half adequate. Don't rub after slathering. This lowers the SPF. Just wipe on and let dry. (Massaging a 15 SPF into yourself reduces it to around an 11 or 12). You may use less if you jack up the SPF rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By JENNIFER ROTHACKER, McClatchy Newspapers
As the heat and sun settle in for summer, the calls to protect your skin from damaging rays begin. But with so many choices of sunscreens, sunglasses, hats and even sun-protective clothing, it might seem easier to hide out in a dark closet. Go ahead, break out the bathing suit. We've got the skin-care basics from two experts in the field: doctors Nancy Thomas, associate professor at the University of North Carolina's Department of Dermatology Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Kelly Nelson, assistant professor at Duke University Medical Center's Department of Dermatology.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Special to the Daily News
You can hardly say someone has "a healthy tan" these days. With scares about depleted ozone layers and burgeoning skin-cancer rates - not to mention windburn aging your epidermis to prune-like leather - can anyone be truly "tanned and rested?" Why, even the Coppertone baby is wearing No. 35 these days - and she only hits the beach after 4 p.m. Enter onto this sun-fearing stage the sun bunny's savior, the fire alarm for the monokini-and-Jams set - the UV SunSensor Patch. "No longer will you be able to whine, 'I used SPF 30 and it wasn't effective!
NEWS
June 18, 2011
New rules announced Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration should help sun worshipers at the Shore better protect themselves by clarifying the confusing and misleading labeling on sunscreens. With the regulations coming after three - count 'em - three decades of study, they're long overdue. The FDA review went on for at least as long as consumers have been confused by which to use among the dozens of sunscreen products on store shelves. UVB? UVA? Which sun protection factor, or SPF, is best?
NEWS
July 3, 2016
Q: How do I find a safe and effective sunscreen? A: Sunscreens are complicated products. They are regulated by the federal government with active drugs and ingredients that can affect different people in different ways. So before taking a bottle to the cash register: 1. Read the directions (and plan to follow them as closely as possible). Skipping the directions could mean that you or your family will be nursing a bad burn because not enough sunscreen was applied or re-applied.
LIVING
July 19, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
If, after all the summer's publicity about excessive sunning, you still crave a deep tan, think of it this way: The change in your skin color after you've been exposed to the sun is actually your body's defense against the sun's ultraviolet rays. While it might seem the fashionable thing to do, repeatedly exposing your skin to the sun is more like applying paint to peeling plaster. The price we're paying for our sun worship is an increase in skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is the most prevalent type of skin cancer, affecting one out of every eight Americans, according to the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Picture yourself and your friends at the beach. You're relaxing on the sand with your towel and maybe a little sunscreen, but you're not really pressed about that. You just want that deep, dark tan you've been dreaming about all winter. Now picture this. When you're in your late 20s, you look in the mirror, and you see wrinkles. Those days on the beach have caught up to you. And you'd better believe they will. Even though the future may seem millions of miles away, your skin gets damaged every time you tan - even when you tan just a little, but especially when you burn.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016
Q: How do I find a safe and effective sunscreen? A: Sunscreens are complicated products. They are regulated by the federal government with active drugs and ingredients that can affect different people in different ways. So before taking a bottle to the cash register: 1. Read the directions (and plan to follow them as closely as possible). Skipping the directions could mean that you or your family will be nursing a bad burn because not enough sunscreen was applied or re-applied.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I'm trying to understand when suntan lotion got weird. I remember the days when baby oil and vinegar counted as suntan lotion. Yes, you read that correctly. The Flying Scottolines used to go to the Jersey Shore for two weeks every summer, and Mother Mary would mix baby oil and red wine vinegar in a bottle before we left for a day at the beach. I have no idea where she got the recipe. Maybe the Mayo Clinic. Or the Mayonnaise Clinic. Anyway, we would slather on baby oil and vinegar, dressing ourselves like a salad.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Joseph Sobanko's patients often ask him which sunscreen is best. That's especially true this time of year, when people are going outside and the sun's rays are at their brightest - and most damaging. Whether the patient is blond or dark, freckled or fair, the Penn Medicine skin-cancer specialist has the same answer: Whichever sunscreen you'll actually use. Far too few of us do, he says. About one in five Americans will develop skin cancer - the most common kind of cancer - in their lifetimes.
NEWS
June 18, 2011
New rules announced Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration should help sun worshipers at the Shore better protect themselves by clarifying the confusing and misleading labeling on sunscreens. With the regulations coming after three - count 'em - three decades of study, they're long overdue. The FDA review went on for at least as long as consumers have been confused by which to use among the dozens of sunscreen products on store shelves. UVB? UVA? Which sun protection factor, or SPF, is best?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By JENNIFER ROTHACKER, McClatchy Newspapers
As the heat and sun settle in for summer, the calls to protect your skin from damaging rays begin. But with so many choices of sunscreens, sunglasses, hats and even sun-protective clothing, it might seem easier to hide out in a dark closet. Go ahead, break out the bathing suit. We've got the skin-care basics from two experts in the field: doctors Nancy Thomas, associate professor at the University of North Carolina's Department of Dermatology Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Kelly Nelson, assistant professor at Duke University Medical Center's Department of Dermatology.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Lauren Siegler
I admit it: I have cankles. What is a cankle, you may ask? Cankles are when there is no definition between your calf and your ankle. Since I am short, my cankles cause my legs to resemble tree stumps. I tried for a long time to disguise my cankles under long pants or with mile-high heels that elongated my legs. I would get jealous when I saw other women with slim and dainty ankles, and then obsess over my lack of them. The problem is that there is no way to get rid of cankles, except maybe plastic surgery, which is not an option for me. I thought that if I toned up my calves, my ankles would look thinner, but that made my legs look manlier and my ankles look as swollen as a pregnant woman in her third trimester.
NEWS
August 23, 2006 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is this a beach, or the parking lot at the Linc? Some days, it's hard to tell at the Cove, where people back their SUVs right up to the waterline, open up the back, and start the tailgate party. "It's like going to the Eagles, without the game," says Joe Abater, 50, of Deptford. Except for when the guys bring their generators, satellite dishes and TVs, and then they have the game too. It's been known to happen. Whatever works - right, sun worshippers? You take your beach with trucks, or without.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2002 | By ALEX RICHMOND For the Daily News
THINK THERE'S nothing new under the sun, beautywise? That all you have to do to pretty up your skin after months of hiding it under heavy sweaters is to slap on a little sunscreen? Oh, honey. Where have you been? From drugstore to department store, beauty innovations abound. It's time to throw out those bottles of summer necessities from yesteryear and get with the new. Umbrellas in a bottle Did you know that one week of baking on the beach equals a year of the incidental sun exposure you get walking around or driving?
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to make sunscreen products less confusing, the Food and Drug Administration has issued new rules for testing and labeling them. So far, confusion is growing. Several major news outlets inaccurately reported that the FDA is nixing the "sun protection factor" (SPF) on labels in favor of three categories of protection: minimum, moderate or high. In fact, the FDA says, the categories are optional. The SPF number, which indicates protection from sunburning rays, primarily ultraviolet B (UVB)
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | by Gale Hayman, Special to the Daily News
Look around at the stars today who have paid attention to the warnings about overexposure to the sun. Madonna, Sharon Stone and Kim Basinger, among others, are preserving their beauty by carefully protecting their skin. How, once and for all, do you really protect yourself against the sun? Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B rays are the sun's harmful rays, the ones that cause skin cancer and premature wrinkling, and you can't look for them, because they're invisible. They emanate directly from the sun, they're reflected from water, sand and snow, and they're a threat even on cloudy summer days.
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