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Spider

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NEWS
May 26, 2006 | Justine Karp For the Daily News
Standing an astounding 9 feet high and more than 27 feet wide, a massive spider sculpture has been installed on the east terrace at the Philadelphia Art Museum. The placement was funded by the Pew Charitable Trust. The artist, Louise Bourgeois, was born in Paris in 1911. Her art has been exhibited all over the world. Her sculptures are generally made of marble and bronze, but some of her creations also include wax, plaster, latex and cement. Bourgeois formulated ideas for this creation based on the relationship she had with her mom, a tapestry weaver who was overprotective and industrious.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All Adam Solow had in mind was a little container gardening when he planted a rosebush in front of the Center City rowhouse he shares with three other guys near Fitler Square. But then along came a spider. Little did he know the neighborhood would come with it. It's one of those tales of serendipity in the city. For the past month or so, on any given day, scores of passersby, the arachnidically interested and the curious alike, have been stopping to gawk at, admire, and even get a little freaked out by a huge and magnificently marked yellow-and-black spider that has taken up residence outside Solow's otherwise average urban home in the 2400 block of Pine Street.
NEWS
September 20, 2003 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pine Street spider is gone. Hurricane Isabel didn't get her, but it appears that a thief may have. "It was gone way before the hurricane hit. It looks like it was stolen. It's really pathetic," said Adam Solow, whose rowhouse on the 2400 block of Pine Street had been home to the large yellow-and-black spider since August. The spider, an Argiope aurantia, had captured the interest of many of its human neighbors and became a bit of a community bridge. Sometimes spiders decide to move on, but this specimen's human hosts don't think that's what happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | by Gary Thompson Daily News Movie Critic
In "Along Came a Spider," a brainy psycho killer lures an empathic profiler cop into Washington's Union Station via cell phone. Gosh, I haven't seen that since. . .last month, in "Hannibal," when brainy psycho Hannibal Lecter lures empathic profiler Clarice Starling into Union Station via cell phone, right before he is kidnapped by the henchmen of still ANOTHER brainy psycho who'd staked the place out. Think of the congestion if they arrived on the same day. "Will the genius serial killer who drinks martinis made from the tears of frightened children PLEASE move his van from the taxi stand?
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | BY DAVE BARRY
On my 41st birthday, a Sunday in July, I went out to face the spider. It had to happen. There comes a time in a man's life, when a man reaches a certain age (41), and he hears a voice - often this happens when he is lying on the couch reading about Norway in the Travel section - and this voice says: "Happy Birthday. Do you think you could do something about the spider?" And a man knows, just as surely as he knows the importance of batting left- handed against a right-handed pitcher, that he must heed this voice, because it belongs to his wife, Beth, who, although she is a liberated and independent and tough Woman of the '80s, is deeply respectful of the natural division of responsibilities that has guided the human race for nearly 4 million years, under which it is always the woman who notices when you are running low on toilet paper, and it is always the man who faces the spider.
LIVING
February 12, 1996 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One day during the period that scientists call "the greening of the Earth," a spider, or something very much like a spider, stretched out and died. This was in the Late Devonian Period. Trees were forming and spreading from lakes and streams, colonizing the world-desert with the earliest forests. The Earth's continents had yet to separate: The Catskill Mountain Formation that stretches from New York into Pennsylvania - the place where the little arachnid expired - was still south of the equator.
NEWS
July 2, 2007 | By Erika Gebel, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Lounging on the hammock by her backyard woodpile, Jennifer Reynolds suddenly became aware of something behind her left knee. "I did not feel the moment I got bitten," she recalls. That was a Saturday. By Monday, people were commenting on her leg. By Tuesday, a hideous boil emerged. At nearby Riddle Memorial Hospital's emergency room, two of the three doctors who examined her were convinced that this was the work of the notorious brown recluse spider. The previous week, the doctors told her, they'd cut out a piece of a patient's chest to prevent a similar wound from degenerating.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet, learning about Kurds and Kuwait. Along came a spider who sat down beside her - and then kidnapped the U.S. senator's preteen daughter from her exclusive prep school, demanding not only ransom but also the attention of criminal profiler Alex Ross. Along Came a Spider is a movie that exists principally for Morgan Freeman to reprise his role as forensic detective Alex Ross, previously seen in the 1997 cat-and-mouse Kiss the Girls. This is not a bad thing, for those fans of detective yarns and of Freeman.
NEWS
November 2, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any black man with a spider tattoo on his left hand was fair game yesterday. Just ask David Watson, 34, of North Philadelphia. The somewhat bulky African American has such a tattoo on his left hand - thus fitting the general description of the gunman who fatally shot Officer Chuck Cassidy at a West Oak Lane Dunkin' Donuts on Wednesday. Watson said he was still in bed shortly after 9 a.m. when police rushed in with guns drawn. There were about 10 officers, he said, and they took him to Police Headquarters for questioning.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | For The Inquirer / NANCY WEGARD
Come on up. The annual Holy Assumption Church Carnival opened Monday in Roebling and will run through Saturday night. Two revelers got into the swing of it on the Spider ride.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
What do you get when you serve Roadster Ricotta with Sports Car Sushi? The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider, a wedding of the original, Pininfarina-designed 124 Sport Spider, one of the loveliest Fiats ever, and the wonderfully playful Mazda Miata. Due in U.S. showrooms this summer, this latter-day evocation of that first Spider is a collaboration between Fiat and Mazda. The Japanese automaker supplies the Miata platform and some parts, and will build the rear-drive 124 Spider at its assembly plant in Hiroshima.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE MAN who helped Spider-Man reach the "big time" is coming back to the City of Brotherly Love for Wizard Philly 2015 - and he couldn't be happier. "I've been to Wizard Philly numerous times. I love Philly," said Dan Slott, one of the most popular and prolific writers working in comics today. "I am most looking forward to finally putting to rest . . . Pat's or Geno's? The eternal question! Though, I hear if I want the real Philly cheesesteak experience, I have to stray from the bright lights of Pat's and Geno's.
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
DRESSED OUT appropriately in uniforms that made them look like diseased gray bumblebees, the La Salle Explorers, a team that has confounded its own coach much of the season, was in full Sybil mode last night at Gola Arena. Playing against Richmond, the hottest team in the Atlantic 10, La Salle scored the game's first 10 points, played better than it has all season for the first 23 minutes and led by 16 points. The Explorers then proceeded to go the next 8 minutes without scoring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amazing, but not surprising The Amazing Spider-Man 2 , the first release of the summer movie season and the biggest film of the year for Sony Corp., led the U.S. box office in its opening weekend. Starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone , it netted $92 million at U.S. and Canadian theaters. International sales to date total $277 million. Sony says the movie - the fifth in its Spider-Man franchise, which began with director Sam Raimi 's 2002 film starring Tobey Maguire - is playing on 11,002 screens in China, the biggest release of any film in history.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
PERHAPS the fertile imagination of Stan Lee could conjure a villain with the power to bend time into a recurring loop. The fellow could use his Groundhog Day abilities to rob armored cars, or whatever, and while this was going on the rest of us could be forced to experience the same thing, over and over. Much as we now experience the "Spider-Man" movies, reboots of reboots of a character done to near-perfection, and very recently, by Sam Raimi. Case in point: "The Amazing Spider-Man 2," a long, low-energy movie, that begins with Spider-Man policing New York successfully, but failing in his relationship with Gwen (Emma Stone)
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
"AMAZING Spider-Man 2" star Andrew Garfield recently stirred some controversy when he said he brought up the possibility that Miles Morales - the half-black/half-Latino teen who replaced Peter Parker as Spidey in Marvel's Ultimate comic-book line - could replace him as the movie Spider-Man once Garfield spins his last web. While many dismissed the idea, Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso is not among them. "Yeah, I could easily see it happening," Alonso told Tattle Comics Guy Jerome Maida . "I'm excited by the prospect of seeing the world's most recognizable superhero peel back the mask and show a new face and how inclusive that would be and what a statement that would make - and I don't think I'm alone!"
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
AT THE box office and in the comic books that gave him birth, some signs are pointing to a slight decline in the popularity of Spider-Man, so Sony is hoping that "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" (in theaters today) will juice audiences for a franchise that already has four more sequels and spinoffs planned for the next four years. The first "Spider-Man" film a dozen years ago had a then-unheard of opening weekend haul of $114 million, on its way to a massive $403 million total. However, each subsequent film has seen a drop at the domestic box-office, culminating in "Amazing Spider-Man," the first film in what many thought was an unnecessary reboot, grossing only $262 million domestically.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Learn about the world from a bug's perspective Saturday at Walnut Street Theatre for Kids' production of Doreen Cronin's book Diary of a Worm, a Spider and a Fly . Go inside the creatures' world as they learn to overcome the same challenges that humans experience. Will Worm learn to stand on his own two feet even though he doesn't have any? Will Fly find her superhero powers in time to save her Aunt Rita? Is Spider too big and ready to shed his skin? Experience many teachable moments, including that all kinds of superheroes are important.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
SWEDISH GOLFER Daniela Holmqvist says she was bitten by a spider and used a tee to extract what she thought was potentially fatal venom before finishing her round during qualifying for the LPGA's season-opening Women's Australian Open. The Swedish Golf Federation reported on its website that Holmqvist was hitting out of the rough on the fourth hole at Royal Canberra Golf Club when she felt a sharp pain on her ankle. Holmqvist swatted the spider away and was told by people nearby that it could have been a black widow, so she used a golf tee to pierce the swelling and squeeze out the venom.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By MARK KENNEDY, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Look who's giving safety advice: None other than Broadway's one-time injury-happy Spider-Man. Reeve Carney, who plays the hero in the hit musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," and Robert Cuccioli, who plays the Green Goblin, put aside their substantial comic-book differences Thursday - and apparently any sense of irony - to team up and offer tips about keeping kids safe this Halloween. Flanked by four costumed villains from the show and representatives from the city's fire and police departments, the actors reminded parents to examine all Halloween candy and never eat any unwrapped treats, ensure children wear flame-retardant costumes and masks that never impeded their ability to see and hear, and avoid strangers or unfamiliar houses.
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