FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2001
You're in one of Philadelphia's newest, choicest restaurants, when all of a sudden: "Waiter, there's a human-relations commission spy in my soup!" In an effort to find out if local restaurateurs are as diverse in their hiring practices as they are in their menu selections, the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations has sent more than 30 employees to spy on eateries. Commission executive director Lazar Kleit says visual inspections, while incomplete, will help determine if a full-scale investigation of discrimination in the restaurant industry is warranted.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bait Klaus Kuron dangled was the kind that makes spies drool. In 1981, he dropped an anonymous letter in the mailbox at the East German diplomatic mission in Bonn. Kuron, a top West German counterintelligence specialist, peppered the letter with hints of Cold War secrets he could tell. To the East Germans, his offer seemed almost too good to be true. Apparently fearing a trap, they waited until the middle of 1982 before setting up a meeting. For the next eight years, Kuron, a man with a taste for expensive vacations, sold the East Germans a steady flow of valuable information.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* THE AMERICANS. 10 p.m. tomorrow, FX. JAMES BOND never supervised anyone's homework. Or ran a mom-and-pop business. And he certainly never gave a moment's thought to having his exploits, sexual or otherwise, interrupted by curious offspring. Ian Fleming's superspy might have crumbled under the pressures faced daily by KGB operatives Philip (Matthew Rhys) and Elizabeth (Keri Russell) Jennings in FX's "The Americans," juggling espionage and parenthood in Reagan-era suburbia. As "The Americans" returns tomorrow for a second season in which that juggling act becomes ever more perilous, the Jenningses aren't alone in depicting spies whose double lives may look more like those of our neighbors than like anything from a John le Carré novel.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The trouble with glasnost is that espionage movies made before the Cold War thaw and released after seem as quaint as a two-way radio wristwatch. The Trouble With Spies is such a film, and because this harmless but lifeless whimsy got released the week of the U.S.-U.S.S.R. summit, it seems about as up-to-date as a 1962 calendar. Written and directed by '60s cult filmmaker Burt Kennedy (The War Wagon, Welcome to Hard Times ), Spies is an embarrassment. Its cuteness is dumb, but its sheer ineptness stupefies.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
Why is "The Trouble with Spies" as stupefyingly, as profoundly, boring as it is - so boring that its scant 89 minutes seem like 890? It may be because of the plot, which is about a bumbling British secret agent named Appleton Porter (Donald Sutherland - and it's never explained why he doesn't talk with an English accent) who's sent to a Mediterranean island to ferret out a truth serum developed by the Russians. It's not only ludicrous and hard to follow but hopelessly out of date, the kind of mock-Bond nonsense that proliferated in the late '60s but hasn't been seen much since.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By Richard Cohen
The spy John Walker Jr. sold the Soviets blueprints of American coding equipment. The damage to U.S. security was profound. "If there had been a war, we would have won it," remarked Vitaly Yurchenko, the KGB official who defected to the United States and then defected back to the Soviet Union. Yurchenko was characteristically confused. If there had been a war, no one would have won. Three former Marine guards at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow are now under arrest. Two are charged with allowing Soviet agents virtual free run of the embassy, including the most secure rooms on the building's seventh floor.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
No one has been convicted and executed for violations of the Espionage Act since Julius and Ethel Rosenberg in 1953. In part this is due to Supreme Court decisions in the 1970s which required legislatures to set specific guidelines for when capital punishment could be invoked. Since then, the federal government has not sought the death penalty for such acts as selling or giving U.S. secrets to a foreign power. A senior Justice Department official tells me the Administration is seeking legislative changes so that the death penalty might again be imposed in these cases.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | BY PAUL DAVIS
A naval intelligence officer once told me of an old KGB adage: "Forget the chiefs and generals, get me a file clerk. " The Soviet spy agency believed that although senior western military and intelligence officials were certainly valuable as spies, a good clerk could get his hands on a multitude of secret documents without attracting attention. The KGB had the favor returned when Vasili Mitrokhin, the KGB's former archivist, handed British intelligence six trunkloads of notes taken from the KGB's files of espionage against the West.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
*  ALLEGIANCE . 10 Thursdays, NBC10. NBC's "Allegiance" brings its reluctant Russian spies - and their CIA agent son - to Philadelphia Thursday. Besides including a cameo for Mayor Nutter, the show, which filmed two episodes here in October, takes viewers inside a local landmark most Philadelphians have seen only from the outside. The Masonic Temple on North Broad Street is the focus of a storyline in which the spies are racing the feds to retrieve something from City Hall on a Sunday without being detected.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I wonder whether it's possible to make a bad John le Carré movie: Every one of the 15 films and miniseries based on his espionage thrillers is well worth watching. There are the masterpieces, including Martin Ritt's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and the BBC's 1979 miniseries, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy . But even the weakest films - the 1984 terrorism romance The Little Drummer Girl and the 1990 Cold War love story The Russia House - still outstrip most spy movies.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joyce Xi doesn't want to see another family go through what hers has endured. That's why the daughter of the Temple University professor who was accused of spying for China, in charges that were then dropped, is demanding an apology from President Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch to her father and other Asian Americans wrongly charged. "I think it's important to have a public effort highlighting these injustices that my dad and others have faced, and also to be able to hold the government accountable," said Xi, 23, who graduated from Yale University on Monday with a degree in chemistry.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Jeremy Roebuck, and Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITERS
On nights when Xiaoxing Xi can't sleep, his mind races through the possibilities of what may have started it all. He thinks back to emails that could have prompted the FBI probe. About conversations that might have drawn the armed agents to his home. Through the events that left him publicly labeled a Chinese spy. It's been nearly a year since federal prosecutors accused Xi, a world renowned Temple University physicist, of selling scientific secrets with potential military applications to China.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Writer-director David Gordon Green has carved out an impressive career since his 2000 feature debut, George Washington , a moving story about a group of kids growing up in a poor rural town in North Carolina. Green followed up with a series of emotionally engaging, even raw, portraits of complex, flawed characters whose lives are touched by tragedy, including Undertow (2004), Snow Angels (2007), Joe (2013), and Manglehorn (2014). Green also is possessed of a rare comic genius - he's best known for a pair of sublimely funny stoner fantasies, Pineapple Express and Your Highness . He's at his best when he combines the tragic and the comic in his more absurdist dark comedies and social satires, including The Sitter , Prince Avalanche , Compliance - and his latest offering, the political comedy-drama Our Brand Is Crisis , an edgy, satirical look at the electoral process starring Sandra Bullock, Scoot McNairy, and Billy Bob Thornton.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Stephanie Czech Rader, 100, a spy in postwar Europe, died Thursday at he home in Alexandria, Va. She had Parkinson's disease, but the immediate cause was complications from recent surgery, said a friend, Michael Golden. Mrs. Rader was the daughter of Polish immigrants, uneducated laborers who settled in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in the early 1920s and barely spoke English. Her immersion in Polish language and culture proved critical to her success, against daunting odds, as a U.S. spy in Europe after World War II. Recruited to the Office of Strategic Services and the Strategic Services Unit of the War Department, precursors to the CIA, she was officially employed as a clerk at the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Ellen Gray, Staff Writer
LONDON SPY 10 p.m. Thursday, BBC America Boy meets boy. Boy loses boy in worst imaginable way. Boy takes on a dark and dangerous world to prove that the love of his life was real. So goes "London Spy," a five-episode heartbreak of a thriller that premieres Thursday on BBC America. Ben Whishaw ("The Hour," "Spectre") plays Danny, a worldly but not so wise young Londoner whose chance encounter with an introverted investment banker named Alex (Edward Holcroft)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2016
_ WAR & PEACE. 9 p.m. Mondays through Feb. 8, Lifetime, A&E, History Channel. It's a classic of Russian literature, spoken with the inevitable English accent (even Gillian Anderson has one), but this four-week Leo Tolstoy story, adapted by Andrew Davies ("Pride and Prejudice"), is also a splendid, sprawling romance. Lily James ("Downton Abbey") plays Natasha and Paul Dano is Pierre, who unexpectedly inherits a title and fortune but finds it can't buy happiness. _ MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IT TOOK the combination of James Bond and Charlie Brown to save the box office after a disastrous few weekends of flops. Both "Spectre" and "The Peanuts Movie" reinvigorated moviegoers who turned out in droves to check out the new fare. "Spectre" took an easy first-place spot with an estimated $73 million, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday, to become the second-biggest Bond opening of all time. The 24th film in the 53-year-old series stars Daniel Craig as 007 and cost a reported $250 million to produce.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
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