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Spina Bifida

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NEWS
November 26, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Start with the legs: From the knees down, they move like pendulums, slowly swinging in loose ovals as Dennis Dadak ambles through the school's corridors, moving on arm locomotion, his calves almost independent of his thighs. Then one is drawn to the 10-year-old's face: The mahogany-hued thatch of hair, the broad cheekbones, eyes brown and big as chestnuts, and underpinning it all a smile like a familiar slap on the back. The smile lurks there, under the boy's other features, sometimes on the edge of deviousness, more often testing the waters of a stranger's friendliness.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward B. Charney, 48, of Cherry Hill, a dedicated professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who was widely recognized for his work with children with spina bifida, died of cancer Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. "His interest in helping children with these chronic disabilities was special," said William Schwartz, associate chairman of the department of pediatrics at CHOP. "He'd take care of patients from the projects with as much enthusiasm as a child from some fancy family.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 14, Noah Kipfmiller has begun to think about what he'd like to be when he grows up. "Kind of like a video game designer," said the Bay City, Mich., eighth grader. He does not ponder his distinction as the world's first person to have had successful fetal surgery for a devastating spinal cord birth defect. "I have a scrapbook," his mother, Mellissa, said of the hoopla surrounding her son's 1998 birth. "I showed it to Noah. He's just not that into it yet. " Although Noah may not appreciate it, he is a measure of the success - and the implacable limits - of fetal surgery for severe spina bifida, which only recently ceased to be deemed experimental.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children who received fetal surgery to correct the most severe form of spina bifida were far more likely to walk as toddlers than those who had surgery after birth, concluded a new study led by researchers at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The seven-year study confirmed some of the highest hopes of believers in the procedure, once thought to be speculative. It also raises new questions, including how to improve results while lessening risks for the mother and baby.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Marie McCullough and Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Pioneering surgery to fix spina bifida long before a baby is born is proving to have benefits, but the risks and limits of the operation remain considerable and controversial. Two new studies conducted by doctors at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Vanderbilt University Medical Center concluded that surgery in the womb can improve potentially devastating brain malformations that usually cause hydrocephalus, or "water on the brain. " Many babies who underwent the surgery were spared the need for a lifelong shunt to drain the fluid.
NEWS
January 18, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly five years after the first fetal surgeries to repair spina bifida, it is clear that the daring operation has significant benefits but does not spare babies from handicaps caused by the birth defect. The latest data, based on the first 39 surgeries performed at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, were presented yesterday in New Orleans at the annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Mark Johnson, director of obstetrical services for Children's division of fetal surgery, reported that surgery in the womb consistently corrected a brain malformation that causes hydrocephalus, or "water on the brain.
NEWS
April 4, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time, scientists have implanted a human organ, the bladder, in seven children after using their own cells to grow the organs in a lab in the first clinical trial of its kind, according to a study published in the Lancet medical journal. The children, ages 4 to 19, were born with defective bladders because of spina bifida and received replacement bladders between 1999 and 2001 at Children's Hospital of Boston, part of Harvard Medical School. The technology, which holds promise for other organs, including the heart, kidney, pancreas and liver, was developed by pediatric urologist Anthony Atala and colleagues formerly of Boston Children's and now Wake Forest University Institute for Regenerative Medicine, according to the April 4 online edition of the Lancet, a British medical journal.
NEWS
March 5, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tim Jones glided over the ice, circling and firing pucks off the sideboards at the Skate Zone in Voorhees. The 18-year-old from Mount Ephraim was waiting impatiently for the goal to be set up so he could begin his final practice before leaving for Turin, Italy, where he will compete in the Paralympics as a member of the 15-man United States sled hockey team. The Paralympics run from Friday to March 19. "I just want to perform to the best of my ability," Jones said in an interview not long ago. Jones plays right wing for the U.S. team, which won the gold medal in 2002 and is favored to win it again this year.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
#Prayfordominic FLETCHER COX does. He's been praying for Dominic since March 7, when he sent a Facebook video message: "I hope you feel better, man. We're praying for you. " The message arrived just hours before doctors operated on the Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma in Dominic's brain. It is a rare, recurring, malignant tumor that turned a 7-year-old sharpshooter into the other kid on Lenape Lane with a wheelchair. Dominic Liples' 5-year-old little brother, Ciarlo, was born with spina bifida.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The reveille bugle shatters the early morning silence and an overnight camp in upper Montgomery County gradually comes to life. Campers sleeping in whitewashed wooden cabins get dressed and ready for a day filled with swimming, sports and crafts. The routine could describe almost any overnight camp. But this one, the Variety Club camp in Worcester, is special because half of its campers are in wheelchairs, disabled by spina bifida, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and amputations from congenital cancers.
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SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
#Prayfordominic FLETCHER COX does. He's been praying for Dominic since March 7, when he sent a Facebook video message: "I hope you feel better, man. We're praying for you. " The message arrived just hours before doctors operated on the Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma in Dominic's brain. It is a rare, recurring, malignant tumor that turned a 7-year-old sharpshooter into the other kid on Lenape Lane with a wheelchair. Dominic Liples' 5-year-old little brother, Ciarlo, was born with spina bifida.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
ROBERT SHEDRICK returned from Vietnam in 1972 shaken and confused. He doesn't like talking about a tour there with the Marines when he lost several of his comrades, or about how he became homeless in 1995, or how he later lost his legs years after drinking water polluted with dry-cleaning fluid and benzene at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. "It was hell in Vietnam," Shedrick, 68, said yesterday across from Independence Hall, where he watched participants arrive at the end of Philly's first Veterans Day parade.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Serenely unaware of her star status, Audrey Rose Oberio nestled in the crook of her father's arm before going home last week from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Months earlier, surgeons had closed a hole in her spine, a defect called spina bifida. With her delivery May 28, the hospital celebrated the arrival of its 1,000th fetal-surgery patient - and the power of diagnosing and treating birth defects in the womb. "When you hit a milestone like this, you tend to be reflective," said Scott Adzick, the pioneering surgeon who in 1995 established Children's Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 14, Noah Kipfmiller has begun to think about what he'd like to be when he grows up. "Kind of like a video game designer," said the Bay City, Mich., eighth grader. He does not ponder his distinction as the world's first person to have had successful fetal surgery for a devastating spinal cord birth defect. "I have a scrapbook," his mother, Mellissa, said of the hoopla surrounding her son's 1998 birth. "I showed it to Noah. He's just not that into it yet. " Although Noah may not appreciate it, he is a measure of the success - and the implacable limits - of fetal surgery for severe spina bifida, which only recently ceased to be deemed experimental.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Dignitaries from the highest ranks of government grieved alongside ordinary citizens yesterday as the woman who served as Chicago's first lady for 22 years was remembered as an inspiration to cancer patients and a passionate woman who helped shape the identity of this tough, but sentimental city. Hundreds gathered inside one of Chicago's oldest churches for Maggie Daley's funeral Mass, while others stood outside, listening to the service over a loudspeaker. The wife of former Mayor Richard Daley died Thursday after a long fight with breast cancer.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children who received fetal surgery to correct the most severe form of spina bifida were far more likely to walk as toddlers than those who had surgery after birth, concluded a new study led by researchers at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The seven-year study confirmed some of the highest hopes of believers in the procedure, once thought to be speculative. It also raises new questions, including how to improve results while lessening risks for the mother and baby.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerard C. Benene, 64, a prizewinning Inquirer photographer and photo editor, died of kidney failure Wednesday, Dec. 15, at Vitas Hospice in Stratford. He had lived in Blackwood. Mr. Benene joined The Inquirer as a copy boy while in high school and then worked in the photo lab. He was a staff photographer from 1972 to 1982, when he became a photo editor. He retired in 2005. In 1973, he won several spot-news awards for a jarring photo of a wounded police officer, shot by another policeman who injured a second officer before killing himself.
NEWS
September 7, 2009 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When he was 8, he was playing wheelchair basketball. By 10, he was the youngest competitor in the Marine Corps Marathon, riding alongside his dad, so he wouldn't get bumped. But that took a different kind of courage. Last week Kevin Smiley spent several days procrastinating before he showed up in Center City with his sign of the times. He faced the morning rush at 16th and Market in a shirt and tie, a giant placard resting on the arms of his hand-pushed chair: His first day, Monday, the aspiring sportswriter kept his sign and his chin up for three hours, gave away six or seven resum├ęs, and left feeling as if he'd proven something to himself.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Lucks, 25, of Malvern, a research assistant, died of blood clots Feb. 27 at George Washington University Hospital in Washington. Mr. Lucks was born with spina bifida, which left his spinal cord incompletely developed. His legs were paralyzed, and he moved with the use of heavy braces and crutches. He rarely used a wheelchair, said his mother, Mary. He preferred to be treated like everyone else, even if it meant pushing himself up steps with a heavy backpack, she said.
SPORTS
January 23, 2008 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
Kaitlyn Willard always envisioned going somewhere with her athletic prowess. The Upper Darby High senior has spina bifida. It is a birth defect, depending on the type, that affects the development of the spinal cord and results in some degree of paralysis. Even with her condition, Willard is having her dream fulfilled. Willard will attend the University of Alabama on a partial athletic scholarship in September to play for the Crimson Tide's women's wheelchair basketball team. She's scheduled to sign her scholarship in February for a basketball scholarship, which covers 5 years.
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