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FOOD
April 12, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Maliyah Gregg's eyes lit up when she spied a package of bacon on the counter for cooking class in the convent kitchen at St. Martin De Porres in North Philadelphia. And then she saw the spinach. "Can I eat just the bacon? Please? Just the bacon and a boiled egg. It will be like breakfast. Please?" After four weeks of cooking lessons, I had gotten the message loud and clear from Maliyah and the other 5th and 6th grade girls: We want meat! While many people are eating less meat and trying to center meals around other proteins for health and environmental reasons, these girls are not quite buying in. I heard the same chorus from my own two boys when I tried meatless family dinners when they were growing up. For them, it just didn't feel like dinner without meat.
FOOD
April 14, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Spinach salad days are here! If you're a gardener, you know spinach likes cool growing weather. That's why springtime tends to be a prime harvest time for the best fresh spinach, making it abundantly available on the supermarket produce counter. Even people who "don't like spinach" (your kids, for example) tend to regard it as a whole different veggie when they encounter it in a salad. That's because uncooked spinach has little of the bitter flavor notes that some people find objectionable in cooked spinach.
NEWS
August 29, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Ah yes, the '70s. Not as emotional as the '60s, not as greedy as the '80s. A Pinto of a Decade, someone said back then. It was decade of "getting in touch with your own feelings. " People talked about their "space. " It was a decade of "energy crisis. " If you weren't lowering your thermostat, you were waiting in line at the gas pump. If you weren't speculating whether gas would be rationed (it wasn't), you were upset because the price of gas rose from 30 cents a gallon to more than a dollar.
FOOD
April 7, 1996 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sweet and sour is the antithesis of togetherness. Rather than meshing into a new and improved flavor, the pair refuses to combine. Instead it vibrates: sweet/sour/sweet/sour/sweet/sour. Which means that as soon as we try to commit our palates to one of them, the other flavor appears, wiping its predecessor away. This phenomenon of taste perception, called layering, is both a treasure and a challenge to anyone who cooks. Because we perceive flavors sequentially, rather than all rolled up together, it is possible to concoct highly sophisticated flavor blends, in which hundreds of tastes blossom and fade across the palate.
NEWS
November 9, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by autumn colors and colonial ambience, the Centre Bridge Inn couldn't have looked more inviting. Now there's something to be said for pretty wrapping, but when it comes to restaurants, a view can only do so much. I arrived, ready to be romanced, by both handsome companion and luscious bounty. The first came through. The latter stood me up. The Centre Bridge Inn, also a 10-room bed and breakfast, has a history of calamities. After its original construction in 1705, as the Centre Bridge House, it was flooded in 1930 and then destroyed by fires in 1932 and 1954.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2001 | by Sono Motoyama Daily News Staff Writer
Decorated like a J.P. Morgan fantasy, the swank new steakhouse the Capital Grille is popular with just who you'd expect - white guys in suits. At 8:30 on a Thursday evening, the place was packed with them - six or seven at a table, laughing, talking on headsets, high-fiving each other and downing massive quantities of red meat. At the bar were a cluster or two of dudded-up gals, perhaps there in hopes of picking up one of these Masters of the Universe. With 13 other locations, including Washington, D.C.; Boston; Chicago; Dallas; and the original in Providence, R.I., the Philly incarnation (with 240 seats!
FOOD
May 12, 1991 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The statue of an Egyptian goddess greets customers in the dusty doorway. She is one of a roomful of antiques at Liberties, a restaurant and bar that duplicates one of this historic (Northern Liberties) neighborhood's early taverns. Liberties' ceiling is copper and tin. The floor is mostly mosaic tile, the sort you still find in the bathrooms of unrestored Victorian rowhouses. The mirror behind the long, curving wooden bar is clouded and, hence, kind to the reflections of aging customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1993 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
There's no doubt that Cafe Einstein, the small, casual dining spot at Race Street near Second, has mastered the equation good food plus reasonable prices plus imaginative decor equals a devoted following. But then, why not? The menu is well-designed and the prices prudent. Einstein, open about six years now, has brick, overhead beams and a skylight, which add a touch of country hominess to this otherwise urban cafe. Original art dots the walls. There's crisp linen on the tables (topped with glass)
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
There's a new appendage to the sign outside the Catfish Cafe in East Falls - one that reads, "And Steakhouse. " The cozy, friendly corner tappie that has catered to fish lovers for seven years has added steaks to the menu, but I'm happy to report that nothing else has changed. The bar and dining room in the century-old building remain charmingly old-fashioned; the welcome's still warm; the prices moderate; the fish dishes fine. When I last reviewed the Catfish more than four years ago, the menu's token chicken breast entree seemed like an afterthought.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Although it hasn't been open long, the Walnut Hill Tavern in Germantown already has a solid sense of self. The simple menu is a model of sandwich-or-entree variety and low prices; the staff is exceptionally pleasant; the place is equally comfortable for family dining or a drink with friends; there's takeout for those who live nearby. A pianist plays in the handsome bar after 9:30 on Friday and Saturday nights. Once word gets out, crowds are sure to pile in. The three wood-paneled dining rooms have an obvious labor-of-love look.
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FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
In modern America, Hanukkah generally overlaps with the Christmas season of gifts and parties. But this year, when the first day of Hanukkah falls on Thanksgiving Day, it bears reflecting on the commonalities of those two holidays: Indeed, both are based on a quest for freedom and both include food traditions to recall days long ago. The food traditions of Hanukkah center on oil, commemorating the story of one day's supply of oil burning for...
FOOD
April 12, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Maliyah Gregg's eyes lit up when she spied a package of bacon on the counter for cooking class in the convent kitchen at St. Martin De Porres in North Philadelphia. And then she saw the spinach. "Can I eat just the bacon? Please? Just the bacon and a boiled egg. It will be like breakfast. Please?" After four weeks of cooking lessons, I had gotten the message loud and clear from Maliyah and the other 5th and 6th grade girls: We want meat! While many people are eating less meat and trying to center meals around other proteins for health and environmental reasons, these girls are not quite buying in. I heard the same chorus from my own two boys when I tried meatless family dinners when they were growing up. For them, it just didn't feel like dinner without meat.
NEWS
June 13, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
ORSON, Pa. - With their easy laughter and scholarly ways, these seven friends sure don't act like rustlers. But on this day, they're definitely on the hunt in northeastern Pennsylvania, combing through overgrown cemeteries and roadside brambles in search of forgotten treasure: old roses. "These roses are part of American history, part of who we are as a people. They should be kept alive," says the Rev. Douglas Seidel, pastor of Jesus Focus Ministry in Churchville and a longtime rose-rustler.
NEWS
November 9, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by autumn colors and colonial ambience, the Centre Bridge Inn couldn't have looked more inviting. Now there's something to be said for pretty wrapping, but when it comes to restaurants, a view can only do so much. I arrived, ready to be romanced, by both handsome companion and luscious bounty. The first came through. The latter stood me up. The Centre Bridge Inn, also a 10-room bed and breakfast, has a history of calamities. After its original construction in 1705, as the Centre Bridge House, it was flooded in 1930 and then destroyed by fires in 1932 and 1954.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Prince Albert of Monaco opened the tiny principality's first consulate in Cuba on Thursday and said he hoped the move would bolster investment in Cuba by his citizens and increase cultural relations between the countries. The prince arrived on Monday for a five-day visit to discuss sports and other programs between Monaco and Cuba. Playing host was Vice President Jose Ramon Fernandez, president of Cuba's Olympics Committee. Albert - who heads the Olympics committee in his country, is a delegate to the International Olympic Committee, and has competed in every Winter Olympics as a bobsledder since 1988 - is next in line for the throne of Monaco, a five-square-mile principality on France's Mediterranean Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2001 | by Sono Motoyama Daily News Staff Writer
Decorated like a J.P. Morgan fantasy, the swank new steakhouse the Capital Grille is popular with just who you'd expect - white guys in suits. At 8:30 on a Thursday evening, the place was packed with them - six or seven at a table, laughing, talking on headsets, high-fiving each other and downing massive quantities of red meat. At the bar were a cluster or two of dudded-up gals, perhaps there in hopes of picking up one of these Masters of the Universe. With 13 other locations, including Washington, D.C.; Boston; Chicago; Dallas; and the original in Providence, R.I., the Philly incarnation (with 240 seats!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If there are more than 40 diners in the Marigold Dining Room, you'll have to wait for a table. But that's OK. There's a comfortable enclosed porch garnished with food magazines at this converted West Philadelphia corner rowhouse. And a wait could be well worth your time. Marigold has been a part of University City's food scene for about 70 years. A recent owner operated the restaurant for about 40 years; now, Charles "Chaz" Covington and Richard DeMatt are the culinary curators of this homespun piece of Americana.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
It was the perfect day for learning the true meaning of wind-chill factor. A day so marrow-numbing cold that just knowing you were on the way to a restaurant named July Grille & Gallery was enough to give you a lift. July, on Walnut Street a few doors east of Broad (construction on the corner building is an unfortunate barrier) is the creation of Charles Mereday, who had been the executive chef at Zanzibar Blue. He brings an interesting mix of culinary-school training and kitchen experience from Atlantic City to St. Croix.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | by Lauralee Dobbinss, For the Daily News
Living up to a big reputation is hard work, but for the past few years, Catelli on Main Street in Voorhees has been doing an admirable job of dazzling its customers with ambitious fare and a beautiful setting. Having heard so many good things about Catelli, three friends and I were particularly looking forward to a relaxing post-holiday meal. We settled in to our table in the elaborate main dining room and enjoyed a glass of wine as our waiter, who grated on everyone's nerves by referring to all of us as "dear," rambled through a list of specials that had all of our eyes glazed over by the time he was finished.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
Happy Fernandez was hungry - so hungry a flat tire on West River Drive wasn't going to get in her way en route to the Cresheim Cottage Cafe in Mount Airy. "The city will take at least 45 minutes to come and get us," Fernandez said as she started hurling objects from the trunk of the city car, pulled over at Ridge Avenue and Calumet Street. The city councilwoman at large, known for her pedestrian-advocacy campaigns, proved handy with a jack, figuring out its non-linear rotation after impatiently watching me try to force it into submission.
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