CollectionsSplitting Hairs
IN THE NEWS

Splitting Hairs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 2005
WHAT'S THE difference between constituent service and lobbying? City Councilman Michael Nutter says he was providing the same services as he would to any constituent in his district in 2003 when he called the sheriff's office several times to inquire about the status of a contract. But, as Erin Einhorn reported in yesterday's Daily News, the constituent in question was ward leader and political infighter Carol Campbell. The contract was a no-bid $80,000 deal to improve efficiency, services Sheriff John Green said this week "weren't needed.
NEWS
January 9, 1989
Who's right in the fight over the legality of splitting in two the job of city representative and commerce director? Mayor Goode says the recent opinion by City Solicitor Seymour Kurland supports the mayor's decision - when he first took office - to separate city rep from commerce director. City Councilman John Street says no way, that Kurland's opinion clearly establishes that splitting the jobs is contrary to the city charter. Frankly, it doesn't really matter who's right on this issue.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
On a gray Friday morning, bald guy Howard Brauner walks up to bald guy Breanden Barry to talk about Bald Guyz, Brauner's brand-new line of grooming products for, well, bald men. "No, no, no . . .," Barry says, hustling around the corner of Eighth Avenue and 58th Street. "I like being bald. I don't want to grow hair. " "This is not to grow hair," Brauner explains, offering Barry an opaque, paper-thin wipe to mop his hairless brow. "It's about taking care of the head. It's about celebrating your baldness.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Matt Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
Anthony and Betty Talamonti have received a variance allowing them to build six townhouses on a 19,000-square-foot Kennett Square tract despite the small size of four of the proposed lots. "I think it satisfies the spirit, if not the exact letter, of the law," Zoning Hearing Board member Peter Waldrop said at Tuesday's meeting. Waldrop said the four lots fell below the required 3,000-square-foot minimum size by less than 10 percent, and that the two remaining lots were well over the minimum.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
What's the giveaway? Body language? Quibbling? Defensiveness? Rambling answers? Or as one lawyerly wag put it - "If his nose grows. " Some of Philadelphia's top lawyers told how they gauge a witness's truthfulness after President Clinton's grand jury testimony was televised in the Monica Lewinsky case. Tom Bergstrom, defense attorney in the John du Pont murder case, looks for "the simple answer" in spotting lies. "There's all sorts of body language," he added.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
The Media Borough Council has approved an ordinance to increase the borough water rate 35.39 percent, raising the average water customer's quarterly bill to $51.11 each quarter. Finance chairman Robert Gioggia said the ordinance, passed by a vote of 5-1 at Thursday's monthly council meeting, will take effect March 31, pending approval from the state Public Utilities Commission. The increase will apply equally to Media Water Works customers inside and outside the borough, he said.
NEWS
March 12, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As it turns out, Wireless Philadelphia, the supposedly cost-free solution to the city's digital divide, is not completely without costs, the city's chief information officer said yesterday. Responding to questions from City Councilman Frank Rizzo during a budget hearing yesterday, Terry M. Phillis, the city's CIO, acknowledged that he was paying a consultant $200,000 this year as his "technical project manager. " Although Mayor John F. Street had promised that EarthLink would build Wireless Philadelphia at no cost to the city, officials had always anticipated that someone from the city would have to oversee the project, Phillis said.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
PICKING COCONUTS REALLY IS MONKEY BUSINESS Kai-Song took just 34 seconds to grab eight coconuts and win a coconut- picking contest in southern Thailand. Forty monkeys, specially trained to pick coconuts, took part in the competition in Surathani province, about 370 miles south of Bangkok. In the final round over the weekend, Kai-Song was initially neck-and-neck with his main challenger Hai-Kai, who took 40 seconds to shinny up the coconut tree and twist and break the stems of eight nuts and let them drop to the ground.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
To save more state money, Gov. Casey wants to extend his temporary 10 percent pay cut to state supervisors belonging to unions. The move is a shift in the administration's public position and is being met with resistance and threats of a lawsuit. For now it applies only to 1,800 Pennsylvania Social Services Union supervisors, but it could be extended to supervisors in eight other unions. Casey press aide John Taylor confirmed that the administration was talking with union leaders about cutting pay for 7,770 workers by 10 percent for 10 weeks starting next week.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
The executive director of Coatesville's water authority was suspended without pay Thursday night after the authority's board of directors learned she was the target of a state police investigation. Christina Frey, executive director of the City of Coatesville Authority since 1983, is being investigated by the White Collar Crime Unit for alleged irregularities in the authority's $3 million budget. She was suspended by unanimous vote after the board learned of the four- month-old investigation for the first time at its Thursday meeting.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Q: If my stock splits 2-for-1, what happens to my cost basis? - R.Z., Houston A: Your basis splits 2-for-1 along with the stock. Imagine that you bought 100 shares of Meteorite Insurance (ticker: HEDSUP) for $60 each, paying a $10 commission. Your cost basis is $6,010 - or $60.10 per share. After the split, you have 200 shares and your basis is still $6,010, or $30.05 per share. Always add the purchase commission to your cost basis and subtract the sale commission from your proceeds - you'll save a few tax dollars that way. If you're paying a lot more than $10 per trade in commissions, you might want to find a less-expensive brokerage.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
WASHINGTON - For once, a political ad elicited a laugh, and not the kind of angry, dismissive laugh you give when someone insults your intelligence. The 15-second spot that began airing last week opens with images of Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan, and Rep. Jim Gerlach, all Republicans, all blessed with full heads of hair fit for shampoo commercials. "Good hair. Bad ideas," the ad begins - before rehashing the Democratic attack lines of the season: that Republicans are out to eviscerate Medicare while giving tax breaks to the rich.
SPORTS
July 1, 2011 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were quite a few upset Union fans who checked in after reading the game story from Saturday's 3-2 Major League Soccer win over visiting Chivas USA. The story began by telling how the Union were booed after a lackluster first half in which they trailed, 1-0. "How dare you suggest we boo our team," went many an e-mail. Of course, those who protested said that the boos were directed toward the referees, not the players. We're not sure every single boo was for the refs, although earlier this week Union team manager Peter Nowak said he thought they were directed at the officials.
NEWS
March 12, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As it turns out, Wireless Philadelphia, the supposedly cost-free solution to the city's digital divide, is not completely without costs, the city's chief information officer said yesterday. Responding to questions from City Councilman Frank Rizzo during a budget hearing yesterday, Terry M. Phillis, the city's CIO, acknowledged that he was paying a consultant $200,000 this year as his "technical project manager. " Although Mayor John F. Street had promised that EarthLink would build Wireless Philadelphia at no cost to the city, officials had always anticipated that someone from the city would have to oversee the project, Phillis said.
LIVING
October 19, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world of horticulture can be such a hothouse - precious, overheated, known for hellebore zealots and rabid rosarians, fussy nomenclature and high-minded science. So what to make of Ilene Sternberg? Her business card says "will work for chocolate. " She wears rubber-chicken earrings. "Give me eBay or give me death!" she declares. Who is this crazy person? She's a beloved fixture on the local gardening scene, a fast-talking, wisecracking Groucho Marx of a plant person who pokes fun at the gardening world from the inside out. And she's got every right.
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world of horticulture can be such a hothouse - precious, overheated, known for hellebore zealots and rabid rosarians, fussy nomenclature and high-minded science. So what to make of Ilene Sternberg? Her business card says " will work for chocolate . " She wears rubber-chicken earrings. "Give me eBay or give me death!" she declares. Who is this crazy person? She's a beloved fixture on the local gardening scene, a fast-talking, wisecracking Groucho Marx of a plant person who pokes fun at the gardening world from the inside out. And she's got every right.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
On a gray Friday morning, bald guy Howard Brauner walks up to bald guy Breanden Barry to talk about Bald Guyz, Brauner's brand-new line of grooming products for, well, bald men. "No, no, no . . .," Barry says, hustling around the corner of Eighth Avenue and 58th Street. "I like being bald. I don't want to grow hair. " "This is not to grow hair," Brauner explains, offering Barry an opaque, paper-thin wipe to mop his hairless brow. "It's about taking care of the head. It's about celebrating your baldness.
NEWS
January 29, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cleopatra kept African servals as pets, and President Calvin Coolidge had a wallaby, a Chester County lawyer argued yesterday. Similarly, the 13 unusual animals seized in March by the state Game Commission from Sandra Reynolds, a London Grove breeder, are anything but wild and should be returned to her - as a judge ordered, Reynolds' lawyer argued. In December, Chester County Judge Lawrence E. Wood told the state that Reynolds should be reunited with her servals, ring-tailed lemurs, fennec foxes and kinkajous.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | By Larry Eichel
Before the Bill Clinton years start to fade into history, let us pause to reflect on the absurdly fitting way in which they ended. The Carter administration concluded as the American hostages were being freed from Iran. Ronald Reagan's administration ended with signs that the Soviet empire was about to crumble. The last act of the Clinton era was a deal with the special prosecutor. The final afternoon brought an all-too-familiar scene: David Kendall, the president's personal attorney, emerging from the White House to face a battery of microphones and engage in the tiresome ritual of the parsing of the words.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|