CollectionsSports Drinks
IN THE NEWS

Sports Drinks

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 16, 2013
When I ran the 2011 Philadelphia Marathon, my trek included 26.2 miles of running and four port-a-potty stops. The culprit, I believe, was the bottles of sports drinks I consumed in the days leading up to the race and that morning, thinking I would be providing myself with the right hydration to run a marathon. Not quite. Skratch Labs to the rescue. They're working on ways to provide better options for endurance athletes, in both drink and food. Allen Lim, a sports physiologist, was the director of sports science for the Garmin-Sharp Pro Cycling Team.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHILD-SAFETY SEATS Parents, the government is investigating one of the nation's most popular automobile child-safety seats, which some consumer groups believe may be linked to the deaths of five children. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will check into possible latch problems with the One-Step child seat made by Evenflo Juvenile Furniture Co. Evenflo, owned by the sports equipment-maker Spalding, denies that there is any defect and says consumer misuse causes most known problems.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
PHILADELPHIA 3 judges suspended from Traffic Court The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Friday suspended without pay three of the nine judges indicted Thursday for what federal investigators called a massive "culture of ticket-fixing" at Philadelphia's Traffic Court. The suspended judges are Michael Sullivan, who had been administrative judge until being removed from the leadership post in December 2011 by the Supreme Court while the federal probe was still going on; Michael Lowry, and Chester County District Judge Mark Bruno, who heard cases in Traffic Court.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
PRESCHOOL SELECTION. Parents' preschool selection criteria often ignore their children's best interests. So says Jackie Haines of the Gesell Institute of Human Development. Children's main concerns - "Will the kids like me? Will the teacher like me? Is this going to be a safe place?" - are more appropriate, she says, than most parents' concerns: "What do you learn? How soon is the reading going to come? Do you do phonics? Do you have workbooks? Is my child going to be ready for kindergarten?"
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children adapt less effectively than adults to hot weather, making them more vulnerable to heat-induced sickness. Children produce more body heat than adults, sweat less, and take longer to get used to temperature changes. At the same time, maybe because their thirst mechanisms are not well developed, children often feel no need to drink enough to replace fluids lost during exercise. On a hot day, this puts them at risk for dehydration. "They'll keep playing, especially if it's something they enjoy doing," said Denise Salerno, a pediatrician at Temple University Children's Medical Center.
FOOD
July 14, 1993 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Tootsie Roll Pops Quiescently Frozen Dessert. $2.39 per variety package of 12, 1.75-ounce bars. Bonnie: Although many companies have adapted their candy bars to frozen treats in the past few years, this lollipop adaptation is a first. To emulate its namesake, each frozen Tootsie Roll Pop contains flavored ice around a fudge-flavored center. Like Tootsie Roll lollipops, the product is artificially colored and flavored, and the main ingredient is sugar. The frozen Tootsie Pop, though, actually contains fewer calories.
SPORTS
May 4, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hours after his team was eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs, Carolina Hurricanes defenseman Steve Chiasson was killed when his pickup truck flipped on a dark, lonely road. The 32-year-old player was found early yesterday morning in north Raleigh, and the State Highway Patrol said he might have been speeding after drinking alcohol. The truck rolled and ejected Chiasson, who was not wearing a seat belt and had been driving alone, investigators said. Weather was not a factor and no other vehicles were believed to have been involved.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Headed out for some physical activity and want to perform like the Eagles' red-hot Duce? Well, drink bottles of water or chug sports drinks, but please, don't guzzle pickle juice. As many fans know, pickle juice was one of the drinks of choice for some of the Eagles players this weekend, a weapon that some say helped them romp the Dallas Cowboys at Texas Stadium, where the mercury on the field climbed as high as 171. But nutritionists issue a stern warning to the amateur athlete - pickle juice can be downright dangerous.
NEWS
March 4, 2006 | By David Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When small amounts of benzene, a known cancer-causing chemical, were found in some soft drinks 16 years ago, the Food and Drug Administration never told the public. That is because the beverage industry told the government it would handle the problem and the FDA thought the problem was solved. A decade and a half later, benzene has turned up again. The FDA has found levels in some soft drinks higher than what it found in 1990, and two to four times higher than what is considered safe for drinking water.
SPORTS
May 4, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Hours after his team was eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs, Carolina Hurricanes defenseman Steve Chiasson was killed when his pickup truck flipped on a dark, lonely road. The 32-year-old player was found early yesterday morning in north Raleigh, and the State Highway Patrol says he might have been speeding after drinking alcohol. The truck rolled and ejected Chiasson, who was not wearing a seat belt and had been driving alone, investigators said. Weather was not a factor and no other vehicles were believed to have been involved.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 16, 2013
When I ran the 2011 Philadelphia Marathon, my trek included 26.2 miles of running and four port-a-potty stops. The culprit, I believe, was the bottles of sports drinks I consumed in the days leading up to the race and that morning, thinking I would be providing myself with the right hydration to run a marathon. Not quite. Skratch Labs to the rescue. They're working on ways to provide better options for endurance athletes, in both drink and food. Allen Lim, a sports physiologist, was the director of sports science for the Garmin-Sharp Pro Cycling Team.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline reported lower fourth-quarter profits Wednesday and said it would consider selling off two soft-drink brands popular in the United Kingdom, but chief executive officer Andrew Witty said he was "thrilled" with the early feedback received from Philadelphia employees moving from near Logan Square to a new facility at the Navy Yard. "Even some of the diehard skeptics are impressed with how things are going," Witty said during a news conference in London to discuss 2012 full-year and fourth-quarter results.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
PHILADELPHIA 3 judges suspended from Traffic Court The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Friday suspended without pay three of the nine judges indicted Thursday for what federal investigators called a massive "culture of ticket-fixing" at Philadelphia's Traffic Court. The suspended judges are Michael Sullivan, who had been administrative judge until being removed from the leadership post in December 2011 by the Supreme Court while the federal probe was still going on; Michael Lowry, and Chester County District Judge Mark Bruno, who heard cases in Traffic Court.
SPORTS
March 7, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Keith Washington's contributions for Frankford High's basketball team are not limited to quality point-guarding. Lately, in fact, much to the enjoyment of spectators, the 6-1, 170-pound senior has become almost as well known for sideshows. Back on Feb. 14, judging by his histrionics, you would have thought Washington had broken his ankle in, oh, 27 places early in a Public League playoff at George Washington. Not only did he make it back onto the court, he paced a victory. Saturday night at Abraham Lincoln, Washington suffered hamstring-cramping midway through the fourth quarter of the Pioneers' spirited battle with La Salle for the Class AAAA City Title, then spent the rest of the game occasionally imitating Grandpappy Amos (Google him, young heads)
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter wants to treat the city's weight and wallet problems in his 2010-11 budget with the same remedy: the nation's highest tax on all sweetened beverages including soda, energy drinks, ice tea, even chocolate milk. Nutter's plan would put Philadelphia at the front of the movement to tax sweet drinks, an effort that the beverage industry already opposes and that could encounter resistance in City Council. The tax rate would be 2 cents per ounce, 40 cents on a 20-ounce bottle of soda.
NEWS
March 4, 2006 | By David Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When small amounts of benzene, a known cancer-causing chemical, were found in some soft drinks 16 years ago, the Food and Drug Administration never told the public. That is because the beverage industry told the government it would handle the problem and the FDA thought the problem was solved. A decade and a half later, benzene has turned up again. The FDA has found levels in some soft drinks higher than what it found in 1990, and two to four times higher than what is considered safe for drinking water.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children adapt less effectively than adults to hot weather, making them more vulnerable to heat-induced sickness. Children produce more body heat than adults, sweat less, and take longer to get used to temperature changes. At the same time, maybe because their thirst mechanisms are not well developed, children often feel no need to drink enough to replace fluids lost during exercise. On a hot day, this puts them at risk for dehydration. "They'll keep playing, especially if it's something they enjoy doing," said Denise Salerno, a pediatrician at Temple University Children's Medical Center.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Headed out for some physical activity and want to perform like the Eagles' red-hot Duce? Well, drink bottles of water or chug sports drinks, but please, don't guzzle pickle juice. As many fans know, pickle juice was one of the drinks of choice for some of the Eagles players this weekend, a weapon that some say helped them romp the Dallas Cowboys at Texas Stadium, where the mercury on the field climbed as high as 171. But nutritionists issue a stern warning to the amateur athlete - pickle juice can be downright dangerous.
SPORTS
May 4, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Hours after his team was eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs, Carolina Hurricanes defenseman Steve Chiasson was killed when his pickup truck flipped on a dark, lonely road. The 32-year-old player was found early yesterday morning in north Raleigh, and the State Highway Patrol says he might have been speeding after drinking alcohol. The truck rolled and ejected Chiasson, who was not wearing a seat belt and had been driving alone, investigators said. Weather was not a factor and no other vehicles were believed to have been involved.
SPORTS
May 4, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hours after his team was eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs, Carolina Hurricanes defenseman Steve Chiasson was killed when his pickup truck flipped on a dark, lonely road. The 32-year-old player was found early yesterday morning in north Raleigh, and the State Highway Patrol said he might have been speeding after drinking alcohol. The truck rolled and ejected Chiasson, who was not wearing a seat belt and had been driving alone, investigators said. Weather was not a factor and no other vehicles were believed to have been involved.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|