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Sports Medicine

NEWS
October 24, 2011
Accurate feedback is better for students than bogus praise In another blow to the self-esteem movement, a University of Pennsylvania researcher has found that students are less likely to be depressed if they have accurate views of their performance and get accurate feedback about it. Lead researcher Young-Hoon Kim, a postdoctoral researcher at Penn, worked with Chi-yue Chiu at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, to evaluate the...
SPORTS
June 1, 2011
BARTOLO COLON is 38. He is not the best-conditioned pitcher on the planet. Bart's playing field should be a lily pad. He should be zapping flies, not breaking bats. By 2009, the right arm that won the American League Cy Young Award in 2005 hung limp as a soup-kitchen dishrag. His elbow was shot. His rotator cuff was torn. The labrum had seen better days. The guy's MRI showed so many loose bodies, it looked like a 1950 TV test pattern. It hurt like hell when he tried to throw.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Christina Hernandez, For The Inquirer
When a professional athlete in middle age can maintain elite performance, they join a short list. It includes George Blanda, the NFL quarterback and kicker who retired at 48 after 26 seasons; tennis star Martina Navratilova, who won a Grand Slam title two months shy of her 50th birthday; and swimmer Dara Torres, who at 41 earned three silver medals at the Olympics. Then there's boxer Bernard Hopkins, who on Saturday could become the oldest fighter to win a major world title.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011 | 'By Daniel I. Dorfman, For The Inquirer
The Nolan Ryan biography has so many amazing parts. The 324 wins, the 5,714 strikeouts, the seven no-hitters, and the 12 one-hitters. But one part of his career almost defies logic: his durability. From 1971 to 1992 - when he was 45 years old - the pitcher dubbed "The Ryan Express" started at least 26 games every season with the exception of the strike-shortened 1981 campaign. And that was despite shoulder surgery after the 1975 season. It was even more remarkable considering Ryan was not a knuckleballer or a soft tosser but instead threw 100 m.p.h.
SPORTS
January 29, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Jim Lynch hinted that a version of bogo could be in the works. As in srobmgtm . . . Successfully Recruit One Burr, Maybe Get Two More. Lynch, a 6-4, 225-pound senior at West Catholic High, the PIAA Class AA state football champion, yesterday made an oral commitment to Norfolk State, and added that two of his teammates, who for the moment prefer to remain anonymous, could be joining him. Lynch earned first-team Daily News All-City honors on the defensive line (he played end)
SPORTS
October 6, 2010
According to Eagles coach Andy Reid, quarterback Michael Vick has a crack in his rib cartilage, and running back LeSean McCoy has a crack in a rib bone. Brian Sennett, chief of sports medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, said the injuries are similar but different. "The last one inch of the distance from the rib to breast bone is cartilage," Sennett said. "It is different from the kind you'd have in a knee. It looks like a rib, but it's made of a cartilage material that allows you to have flexibility so your rib cage can get bigger.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Still is proud of what he has accomplished as a running back for Woodrow Wilson, and justifiably so. Still takes similar pride in what he has achieved in the classroom, where he carries a 3.7 grade point average. His combination of football skill and academics has already earned him a scholarship offer from Monmouth. Others could be coming, especially if Still duplicates his junior year both in football and academics. The 5-foot-8, 190-pound Still rushed for 748 yards (6.48 average)
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I told my mom I wanted to play high school football, she refused to sign the permission form, threatening, "If you got hurt, I'd break both your legs. " Mom's peculiar logic aside, these days I see her point: Why do parents allow their kids to play football? It's got the highest injury rate of all high school sports - 4.36 per 1,000 practices and games (also called athletic exposures), according to the Centers for Disease Control. (The overall injury rate for all sports combined is 2.44 per 1,000 athletic exposures.
SPORTS
May 19, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Serena Williams hasn't played the French Open in 3 years and hardly seems ready for this month's clay-court major. She made an array of mistakes yesterday in her final match before the French Open, losing to Patty Schnyder, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (5), at the Italian Open quarterfinals in Rome. "I'm going to obviously want to work harder and just do some things differently," Williams said. "Where I am today, in Paris I'll probably be even better. " In the semifinals, Schnyder will face third-seeded Jelena Jankovic, who routed Elena Dementieva, 6-2, 6-1. Second-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova beat sixth-seeded Dinara Safina, 6-1, 6-3, in an all-Russian match and will next play ninth-seeded Daniela Hantuchova, who beat unseeded Anabel Medina Garrigues, 7-6 (8)
SPORTS
December 17, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daryl Robinson is doing a lot of talking. Not on the football field, where his actions speak loudly and his demeanor is calm, but on his active cell phone. The North Catholic senior with the oral commitment to Temple has been working the lines now that his high school career is over and the Owls beckon. It's not just the outgoing calls that keep Robinson's cell working overtime. College coaches are still trying to lure him - two months from signing day - away from still-struggling Temple.
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