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Sports Medicine

NEWS
October 9, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Douglas M. Weiss, 64, of Swarthmore, a sports trainer and professor emeritus of physical education at Swarthmore College, died Sept. 25 of complications from surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. For 34 years, until his retirement in 2002, Mr. Weiss treated Swarthmore students - athletes and nonathletes - as well as faculty and staff and their dependents. He also taught weight training. He was hired in 1968 to care for Swarthmore's intercollegiate male athletes in a small training room that was walled off from the men's locker room with chicken wire and plywood.
SPORTS
July 18, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
The doctor who pleaded guilty to conspiring to illegally prescribe steroids to several Carolina Panthers was sentenced yesterday in Columbia, S.C., to 1 year and 1 day in prison. Dr. James Shortt pleaded guilty in March to one federal count of conspiracy to distribute anabolic steroids and human growth hormone. Prosecutors have said current and former members of the Panthers were some of Shortt's patients. As part of the plea deal, prosecutors dropped 42 other counts against Shortt, 59. Chief U.S. District Judge Joe Anderson ordered Shortt to pay the minimum fine, $500, and a $100 special assessment.
SPORTS
August 29, 2005 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Growing up, Mariel Marinelli played tennis in the summers, dabbled in horseback riding, and began cheerleading in kindergarten. By fifth grade, she had added field hockey to her hectic schedule. One by one, though, some interests faded. Now, for the first time that she can remember, Marinelli will concentrate on just one extracurricular activity: field hockey. "I didn't see a future for me in cheerleading," the soon-to-be junior at Villa Maria Academy in South Jersey said recently at a field hockey camp at St. Joseph's University - one of six she set out to participate in this summer.
SPORTS
August 29, 2005 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Mallori Malachi, a multisport athlete at Central High School with Division I potential, fatigue, like injuries, has never been much of a dilemma. Sports do present one collective question for the soccer goalie and varsity volleyball and basketball player, however: How many sports could or should she play while trying to maintain a social life, manageable schedule and a viable game plan for on-field success? "I stopped playing AAU basketball this summer because of the conflict it had with club soccer," said Malachi, who plays for West Chester United.
SPORTS
August 28, 2005 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dick Vermeil, considered one of the best Eagles coaches ever, walked away in 1982 after just seven NFL seasons because, he said, he was "burned out. " He was 45. Eddie Bond, a senior-to-be at Eastern High School, wants to walk away from a year-round life of basketball, because of burnout. "I definitely have it," Bond said. "I guess that's bad to say. " Especially if you're 17. Unlike Vermeil, though, Bond has not quit. His father told him that he either needed to play or, gulp, get a job. The 5-foot-9 guard from Berlin chose hoops.
SPORTS
May 17, 2005 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Riding in a launch behind the men's varsity lightweight eight final Saturday in the Dad Vail Regatta, referee Michael Siconolfi saw tragedy and heroism unfolding in the Boston College boat that had just won the race. Siconolfi, a Jesuit priest who is an adjunct professor at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, N.Y., was about 10 feet from the boat as Ned Borgman attempted to revive teammate Scott Laio, who had collapsed in the bow seat behind him. "He had his fingers down Scott's throat so he wouldn't swallow his tongue," Siconolfi said from Syracuse yesterday.
NEWS
December 21, 2004 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is highly unlikely that Eagles wide receiver Terrell Owens will be fit enough to play again this season, according to several Philadelphia orthopedic specialists. Not even in the Super Bowl - if the Eagles make it. The specialists said yesterday that Owens would need months to recover fully from the severe ankle injury he sustained Sunday in the Eagles' 12-7 win over the Dallas Cowboys. "This is a long recovery. It is a major injury," said Pekka Mooar, associate professor of orthopedics and sports medicine at Temple University, who hasn't personally evaluated Owens.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Nikki Usher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Courtney Gaston will remember her last high school soccer game forever. But not because she got to savor a state championship or a big win against a rival school. Instead, the senior from Clearview in Gloucester County will remember the Sept. 23 game as the one that crushed all her hopes of playing soccer in college. And all it took was a quick change of direction on the field. Gaston, like hundreds of high school girls in the New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania region, tore the anterior cruciate ligament in her knee.
SPORTS
October 30, 2004 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
She is a portrait of potential, heartbreak and destiny. Even before she was old enough for middle school, she was projected to become a high school soccer standout. She had three knee operations before she reached the 10th grade, leaving her unable to play sports as a freshman and sophomore. Another knee injury, followed by a hand injury, cut short her athletic career. And now, after being injured so often, Alyssa Montemore, a senior at Gateway, has decided to make sports medicine a career.
SPORTS
October 30, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Pittsburgh Penguins owner/center Mario Lemieux had arthroscopic hip surgery yesterday and is expected to miss three to four weeks. The Penguins announced that Lemieux was operated on as an outpatient at the UPMC Center for Sports Medicine in Pittsburgh. Torn and damaged cartilage was removed from his hip. Lemieux first noticed the pain during a Sept. 22 exhibition game and missed three games because of the injury. The Penguins said his condition failed to respond to physical therapy and muscle-strengthening treatments.
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