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Sports Memorabilia

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NEWS
May 23, 1994 | By Wendy Beech, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul Goldin, 62, a Cherry Hill resident who was a pioneer in the sports- memorabilia industry, died Saturday at West Jersey Hospital in Voorhees. Capitalizing on a growing demand for sports collectibles and memorabilia, Mr. Goldin and his son, Ken, opened The Score Board Inc., specializing in sports cards and memorabilia, in Cherry Hill in November 1986. By July 1987, the company had gone public, offering baseballs signed by Joe DiMaggio and Hank Aaron, jerseys autographed by Wayne Gretzky and Joe Montana, and basketballs signed by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Angelo Cataldi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hobby of collecting baseball cards and autographs, a symbol of boyhood innocence for close to a century, is no longer a hobby - and no longer innocent. With $1.5 billion having been spent on sports memorabilia in the past year alone, the boys have been overpowered by businessmen, and the innocence has given way to deceit. In the midst of its greatest boom, the industry has become inundated with forged autographs, bogus baseball jerseys and mail-order frauds. Even the cards themselves - the foundation of the business - have been tainted by counterfeiters.
NEWS
August 14, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Playthings will be featured at two two-day catalog auctions next week: dolls Wednesday and Thursday, sports memorabilia Friday and next Saturday. The dolls and related paraphernalia will be offered by Alderfer Auction Co. in Hatfield. The 1,300 lots, with collections from the family of Lorena Hershey (a cousin of chocolate magnate Milton S. Hershey) and antiques authority Lita Solis-Cohen, include dolls made of bisque, papier-mache, cloth, plastic and celluloid, as well as dollhouses and furnishings, clothing and accessories, doll body parts, books, and 60-plus lots of Steiff stuffed animals.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
With an estimated value of $5 million to $7 million, the Copeland collection of baseball cards and sports memorabilia being sold by Sotheby's this weekend in New York is no doubt attracting what could justifiably be called the "heavy hitters. " Oddly enough, however, it is not the only imminent sports-memorabilia sale. Two auctions in New Jersey over the next few days not only will offer baseball cards and similar collectibles, but also will sell baseballs autographed by Babe Ruth.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's something to look forward to during the dog days at the end of this month: Hunt Auctions' annual late-summer sale of important sports memorabilia. The two-day sale will be held Aug. 22 and 23 at the Holiday Inn on Route 100 in Lionville and will feature baseball cards, uniforms and collectibles. As usual, the top items will be offered at the Aug. 23 session, which begins at 11 a.m. Among the most interesting items to be sold will be a 1954 Brooklyn Dodgers baseball bat from a local consigner, according to David Hunt.
NEWS
August 18, 2003 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was in the seventh grade, David Hunt got his parents to rent tables for him on weekends at the Granite Run Mall so he could sell his baseball cards to passersby. Now he is 32, the owner of one of the major sports auction houses in the country. But he still relishes the thrill of those first ventures in entrepreneurial capitalism. "When you're 13 years old and you sell a few hundred dollars of cardboard, you're pretty happy about it," he said. Hunt owns Hunt Auctions Inc. in Exton.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2001 | By Bob Fernandez, Brian Woodward and Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
They are the shock troops of sports memorabilia merchandising. Thirty of them arrived in Philadelphia late Monday night, mostly from Kansas City. By Tuesday afternoon, they had opened 15 sports-memorabilia outlets in formerly empty stores in strip plazas, hotels and mall kiosks throughout the city and the suburbs, selling NBA-licensed 76ers jerseys, shorts and other souvenirs. Yesterday, two of them - employees of an outfit from Overland Park, Kan., called SportsWon Inc. - were handling a steady, although not overwhelming, flow of retail traffic in the Brandywine Ballroom in the Double Tree Hotel on Roosevelt Boulevard.
SPORTS
November 26, 1989 | By Angelo Cataldi, Inquirer Staff Writer
He is married with three children, lives in a comfortable home about 20 miles outside of Philadelphia and works for a construction company. If it weren't for the cardboard box hidden under a blanket in the corner of his basement, there would be no tangible evidence of his former life. Inside the box are a few dozen baseball cards, three financial ledgers, a handful of other papers and several autographed baseballs and photographs left over from the time when he was one of the top sports-memorabilia dealers in the nation.
LIVING
November 19, 1995 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can O.J. Simpson still make a living being O.J. Simpson? Events of the last 6 1/2 weeks suggest that it won't be easy. No publishers or pay-per-view television companies have clamored for his services. Corporate America has avoided any association with him, as NBC found out when it planned to interview him live in prime time after his murder trial. Even International Creative Management, his Hollywood talent agency of 20 years, dropped him, though he was found not guilty in the murders of his ex-wife and her friend.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A West Chester man who allegedly attempted to con the QVC home-shopping network by forging baseball cards and other sports memorabilia will face theft charges this month in West Chester District Court. According to court records, Gordon R. Robothum of West Chester stole more than $11,500 worth of sports memorabilia from QVC Inc. Using credit cards belonging to him and his wife, Pamela Cronk, Robothum allegedly ordered thousands of dollars' worth of autographed sports memorabilia from QVC. He then kept the autographed baseballs and baseball, football and basketball collectors' cards and sent back for refunds similar items with forged signatures and forged authenticating documents, records say. Court records indicate only the best items were stolen: baseballs signed by Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, Frank Thomas and Nolan Ryan and collectors' cards autographed by football players Troy Aikman, Drew Bledsoe, Heath Shuler and Marshall Faulk, Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Shaquille O'Neal of NBA fame.
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SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
YOU'VE HEARD the term "costly turnover"? For Warriors point guard Steph Curry, it's a reality. According to the San Francisco Chronicle , Curry's mom, Sonya, allows him three turnovers per game. After that, he pays $100 for each miscue. "It's a win-win for me," Curry told the Chronicle . "I take care of mom, and I have a lot less turnovers. " So far this season, he's averaging a career low 2.1 per game. High hopes I Seahawks running back Marshawn "Beast Mode" Lynch has friends in "high" places.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE MONEY just ran out. That was the crux of Don Tollefson's opening statements to a Bucks County jury yesterday as he prepared to defend himself against charges he defaulted on more than $300,000 in sports travel packages under the guise of a charity. Bucks County Chief Prosecutor Matt Weintraub argued that Tollefson, or "Tollie," solicited money on behalf of his charities and auctioned off lavish sports vacations to victims who never got their money back. Bob Goldman served as standby counsel for Tollefson, but the former sportscaster hardly needed him, as he wooed the jurors with his made-for-TV delivery, portraying himself as a man with aspirations too big for his good intentions.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter A. Luukko, who resigned unexpectedly in December as president and chief operating officer of Comcast-Spectacor, has been named chairman of Philly Sports Holdings L.L.C., an Exton company that distributes sports memorabilia and organizes meet-and-greet events with professional athletes. Luukko, 54, worked closely for a quarter-century with Flyers founder Ed Snider, overseeing the team and serving as a member of the NHL board of governors. He also oversaw Comcast-Spectacor's facility-management business, which runs more than 125 sports arenas, stadiums, and convention centers.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In childhood, Dante DeSimone suffered a medical condition that left him confined to a body cast. He underwent surgery and went on to become an ice hockey and lacrosse player at Upper Darby High School who was looking forward to beginning a collegiate career in sports. "He never gave up. My Dante gave 100 percent in everything he did," said his grieving mother, Rita, as friends and family members cried with her at a candlelight vigil Monday night at the scene where her son was killed in a freak accident over the weekend in Delaware County.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A private settlement conference in the Kobe Bryant sports memorabilia case is scheduled for Friday morning in the chambers of U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider. Bryant's mother, Pamela, had consigned some of the Los Angeles Lakers star's Lower Merion High School sports memorabilia to Goldin Auctions L.L.C. in Berlin, Camden County. Bryant objected, saying the memorabilia, worth an estimated $1 million, was not hers to sell. Goldin filed a lawsuit asking the court to clarify ownership and allow the auction, set for June, to proceed.
SPORTS
January 26, 2013
More than a generation after the historic "Miracle On Ice" game in the 1980 Winter Olympics, 58-year-old Mike Eruzione is parting with his iconic No. 21 USA jersey, hockey stick, and other Olympic paraphernalia. Eruzione's white jersey alone is expected to fetch more than $1 million, but some sports memorabilia experts think it could go considerably higher. Eruzione scored the sensational winning goal against the Soviet hockey team in Lake Placid, N.Y., catapulting the Americans toward the gold medal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
William H. Bunch's sale of modern collectibles does not really start to live up to its name until nearly two-thirds of the way through the 325 lots that Bunch will offer beginning at noon Monday at his gallery in Chadds Ford. That's when you can bid on 36 lots of pro football figurines and related sports memorabilia from the last half of the 20th century. They range from footballs used in various professional leagues to more than a dozen sets of figures from the Danbury Mint that include the Steel Curtain, Orange Crush and Purple People Eaters.
SPORTS
July 14, 2012 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, it's tough to remember that sports are just supposed to be fun - taken seriously by the athletes paid to perform, yes, but a only diverting entertainment for the fans, who, after all, are simply watching other people play. On July 5, Boston outfielder Carl Crawford said a fan yelled a racial slur at him at the stadium of the double-A New Hampshire Fisher Cats, where the erstwhile Red Sox slugger was playing in a rehab stint with the Portland Sea Dogs. Crawford has not been a favorite of Boston fans since signing a seven-year, $142 million deal last season.
SPORTS
February 1, 2012 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA authorities are investigating the theft of sports memorabilia and jewelry from the home of former Penn State star John Cappelletti, the 1973 Heisman Trophy winner. Orange County sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said yesterday that the burglary occurred on or around Jan. 20 at Cappelletti's home in Laguna Niguel. Amormino said he cannot say specifically what items were taken but they do relate to Cappelletti's playing days at Penn State and NFL years with the Los Angeles Rams and the San Diego Chargers.
LIVING
March 12, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
An oil painting by the leader of the Scalp Level School, a southwestern Pennsylvania art colony that predated the Brandywine and Bucks County impressionists, will be for sale this afternoon. Alderfer Auction and Appraisal's sale in Hatfield will offer 200 lots of American and European paintings, including the oil by George Hetzel, probably the best-known artist southwestern Pennsylvania had produced until the advent of Andy Warhol. The Scalp Level School took its name from its location, a once bucolic town southeast of Johnstown where around 1830 an art gallery opened that became a nucleus for area artists.
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