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Sports Night

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NEWS
June 28, 2000
"Tonight, a new baby leaves Aaron feeling barren. And the witty Casey has struck out with Dana for the last time, as ABC says RIP to the best sitcom on TV. That leaves the network's line score at one good run, with (alas) no hit and one big error. " Or so the patter might have gone had Sports Night, one of the finest TV shows never to find an audience, done the lead-in to the news of its own demise. In the show's invigorating two-year run, writer Aaron Sorkin proved that it's possible for work of edgy wit and unpredictable feeling to find a home on network TV. Just not a permanent one. It seems people eating roasted rat on a deserted isle draws bigger ratings than three-dimensional characters who laugh, argue, love and (in a sitcom rarity)
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | by Eric Mink, New York Daily News
A multimillion-dollar deal to keep "Sports Night" in first-run production, despite its cancellation by ABC last month, collapsed when the show's creator concluded he would not be able to continue working on it. Aaron Sorkin, who created the critically acclaimed series and was one of its executive producers, said that the Showtime pay-cable channel had made "an extraordinary offer for 44 episodes, two seasons of shows. " At $850,000 per episode, the deal would have been worth more than $37 million, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Move over, Ally McBeal. Say hi to Dana Whitaker. Time magazine lamented last year that the emergence of Ally - ditzy, incompetent, adrift - as a TV icon was the signal of the death of feminism. If feminism died with Ally, it has been resurrected a year later with Dana - skillful, committed, effective - an extraordinary central character on an extraordinary TV show called Sports Night. Television has evolved from housewife Lucy Ricardo ("Don't you dare go to the club!")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1998 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
TV's "premiere week" takes a break tonight in its depressing death march, with three new shows that demonstrate why everybody used to love the little box, and give hope to those of us who still do. They are ABC's The Hughleys (8:30 p.m.) and Sports Night (9:30), and NBC's heretofore extremely mysterious Encore! Encore! (8:30). Each has a different personality - astounding in a season when most new shows have none at all - and one, to judge by its first two episodes, could wind up listed among the finest TV series of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Hooray! Hooray! Felicity will get a chance to grow her hair below her shoulders, and the sublime Andre Braugher will team again with the creator of Homicide: Life on the Street - this time, in a medical show. Fie! and Fooey! Sports Night goes night-night, and Dr. Braugher's ABC show will air opposite TV's longest-running drama, the popular Law & Order, Wednesdays at 10 p.m. on NBC. Show me the Money! With a new Wednesday episode, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire expands to four nights a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | Ellen Gray
THE NEWSROOM. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   TOWARD THE end of the first season of "The West Wing," there's an episode in which President Jed Bartlet (Martin Sheen) and his staff decide it's time to stop being the kind of ineffectual power players Ed Rendell would call "wusses. " "Let Bartlet Be Bartlet" became a rallying cry not just for the characters but for their creator, Aaron Sorkin, who wasn't so much interested in making a drama about how things worked in Washington as he was in showing how they could work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Krause, who helped to make Six Feet Under and Sports Night among the best TV shows of the last decade, is back in top form in ABC's Dirty Sexy Money, a superb satirical dramedy about wealth and celebrity in America. The 10-episode first season, which was cut short by the writers' strike, this week was released on DVD (http://abctvstore.seenon.com; $39.99; not rated). A comedy of (bad) manners, Dirty stars Krause as Nick George, a socially conscious do-gooder lawyer whose life takes a turn when New York's wealthiest family, the Darlings, asks him to take over his late father's position as their family's attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Leo McGarry is on his way to work. "Nice morning, Mr. McGarry," says the guard in the lobby. "We'll take care of that," says Leo, as he passes inside, through a corridor, an office, another office, a corridor, an office, five corridors, an office, a corridor, an office, a corridor, two offices, a corridor and two more offices, before settling behind his desk, 3 minutes and 26 seconds later. The camera is with him all the way, as he has 12 separate conversations, and 133 people (maybe more - they go so quickly)
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Byko's Birthdays Actress Geena Davis stretches 42. Golfer Jack Nicklaus birdies 59. '70s heartthrob Robby Benson is a mature 43. Is it us, or is Sean Penn just buggin'? Feeling dissed, the "Thin Red Line" star whipped off a letter to the top muckety-mucks at 20th Century Fox - Fox chief Rupert Murdoch in particular - because he wasn't afforded a private jet to fly to Houston for a screening. "As I have two movies, two children and [- as each woman is at least two people]
LIVING
April 11, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Television: Hotbed of originality. Tonight a not-so-delightful situation comedy takes a bow before the audience starts throwing the old tomatoes and stale eggs. I believe it's the 6,247th one about life at a radio station. And the 38,906th one about a woman who has trouble with men. It knocks off Sports Night, a model of originality that attracted a rabidly loyal audience of Not Big Enough. Sunday night, Walter Cronkite announced on CBS: "Television is taking a giant step.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | Ellen Gray
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — Some things you just don't see coming. For Alan Poul, the Wynnewood native who's an executive producer on HBO's "The Newsroom" (10 p.m. Sundays), it was the first barrage of criticism for the Aaron Sorkin series set in a fictional cable news network. "I think we knew that there were elements of the show that might spark a conversation, might be slightly provocative," he said last week, after a Television Critics Association press conference in which he'd sat beside Sorkin as the show's creator vigorously defended himself against charges that, among other things, he was portraying supposedly smart women in dumb ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | Ellen Gray
THE NEWSROOM. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   TOWARD THE end of the first season of "The West Wing," there's an episode in which President Jed Bartlet (Martin Sheen) and his staff decide it's time to stop being the kind of ineffectual power players Ed Rendell would call "wusses. " "Let Bartlet Be Bartlet" became a rallying cry not just for the characters but for their creator, Aaron Sorkin, who wasn't so much interested in making a drama about how things worked in Washington as he was in showing how they could work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
NBC can take a joke. That much is clear looking at the lineup it announced Monday morning for the 2012-13 season. The network's new schedule is remarkably sitcom-saturated. And considering that NBC is mired in fourth place in the ratings, surprisingly static. NBC is bringing back an old good-luck charm, Matthew Perry from Friends, for Go On, one of four new comedies this fall. The two new dramas are Revolution, a sci-fi saga from producer J.J. Abrams, and Chicago Fire from Law & Order impresario Dick Wolf.
NEWS
October 11, 2010 | By CHUCK BAUSMAN, bausmac@phillynews.com
THIS WAS THE worst-case scenario of clock management, even worse than coach Andy Reid's. The Phillies and Eagles started virtually at the same time last night, both on national TV, both with huge implications. It was so frustrating for a football town hopelessly in love with its baseball team (or vice versa). How could these schedule-makers and TV types do this to us? The Phils were scheduled to start at 8:07 in a possible National League division series-clinching game in Cincinnati.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Krause, who helped to make Six Feet Under and Sports Night among the best TV shows of the last decade, is back in top form in ABC's Dirty Sexy Money, a superb satirical dramedy about wealth and celebrity in America. The 10-episode first season, which was cut short by the writers' strike, this week was released on DVD (http://abctvstore.seenon.com; $39.99; not rated). A comedy of (bad) manners, Dirty stars Krause as Nick George, a socially conscious do-gooder lawyer whose life takes a turn when New York's wealthiest family, the Darlings, asks him to take over his late father's position as their family's attorney.
NEWS
October 8, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Have you ever watched the endless credits unspool for shows such as Law & Order and ER? These one-hour dramas have more producers than Springtime for Hitler. It's television by committee. TV series tend to be collaborative efforts. But not all of them. For four seasons, The West Wing served as the vibrant canvas for the vision of one man: Aaron Sorkin. That singular arrangement was both good and bad. As he previously proved on Sports Night, Sorkin is the most distinctive and creative writer in the medium, consistently turning out prolix scripts that are crammed with wit and heart.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
"Tonight, a new baby leaves Aaron feeling barren. And the witty Casey has struck out with Dana for the last time, as ABC says RIP to the best sitcom on TV. That leaves the network's line score at one good run, with (alas) no hit and one big error. " Or so the patter might have gone had Sports Night, one of the finest TV shows never to find an audience, done the lead-in to the news of its own demise. In the show's invigorating two-year run, writer Aaron Sorkin proved that it's possible for work of edgy wit and unpredictable feeling to find a home on network TV. Just not a permanent one. It seems people eating roasted rat on a deserted isle draws bigger ratings than three-dimensional characters who laugh, argue, love and (in a sitcom rarity)
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | by Eric Mink, New York Daily News
A multimillion-dollar deal to keep "Sports Night" in first-run production, despite its cancellation by ABC last month, collapsed when the show's creator concluded he would not be able to continue working on it. Aaron Sorkin, who created the critically acclaimed series and was one of its executive producers, said that the Showtime pay-cable channel had made "an extraordinary offer for 44 episodes, two seasons of shows. " At $850,000 per episode, the deal would have been worth more than $37 million, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Hooray! Hooray! Felicity will get a chance to grow her hair below her shoulders, and the sublime Andre Braugher will team again with the creator of Homicide: Life on the Street - this time, in a medical show. Fie! and Fooey! Sports Night goes night-night, and Dr. Braugher's ABC show will air opposite TV's longest-running drama, the popular Law & Order, Wednesdays at 10 p.m. on NBC. Show me the Money! With a new Wednesday episode, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire expands to four nights a week.
LIVING
April 11, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Television: Hotbed of originality. Tonight a not-so-delightful situation comedy takes a bow before the audience starts throwing the old tomatoes and stale eggs. I believe it's the 6,247th one about life at a radio station. And the 38,906th one about a woman who has trouble with men. It knocks off Sports Night, a model of originality that attracted a rabidly loyal audience of Not Big Enough. Sunday night, Walter Cronkite announced on CBS: "Television is taking a giant step.
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