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Sportsmanship

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NEWS
February 11, 2001
Tell a story that illustrates how you learned about sportsmanship, or how you taught it to your children. Send essays of 200 to 300 words by Feb. 26 to Voices/Sportsmanship, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 or e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543. Join the chat on The Political Side of Race at http://forum.philly.com/~news and click on the folder titled "Inquirer Community Voices.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
A scuffle among players following the Strath Haven-Radnor high school football game prompted a discussion at the Wallingford-Swarthmore school board meeting this week on the need to teach good sportsmanship. "We must do everything possible to improve sportsmanship," Norman L. Haase, a school board member, said Monday. "This is not just a problem for our school, but for all the schools in the Central League. " After the meeting, Haase said the fight began during the traditional handshaking between players of the two teams following Saturday's game at Radnor, which Strath Haven won, 24-21.
NEWS
March 25, 2001
After a tough year, attitude changes When I was little, about 6 or 7, I was a bad sport. Because I'm good at sports, I used to get really frustrated when my teammates didn't perform well, so I put them down by saying, "Come on!" or "You stink!" At 11 years old, I look back and see how mean I was, and wish I didn't act that way to others. This bad behavior went on until I was 9. In fourth grade, I made a basketball team with mean but good players and a tough coach. I was the youngest player and not as good as some of the older boys.
NEWS
September 2, 1996 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A different kind of banner hangs high in the Audubon High School gym, a banner that rests among those commemorating state championships and regional titles but boasts of a different kind of success. These banners have been given to the high school year after year to honor its athletic teams for good sportsmanship. And when school officials hang the 1995-96 Colonial Conference Athletic Sportsmanship Award among the rest, it will mark the 11th time in 16 years the school and its teams have won such an honor.
NEWS
May 21, 2004 | By Marybeth T. Hagan
Too bad there was nobody covering the varsity lacrosse game between St. Joseph's Prep and Northeast Catholic High School earlier this month at Edgely Field in Fairmount Park - not for the sopping-wet-in-the-rain 12-2 score, but for something more. The match was played with mud aplenty. Still, there was none of the dirt that has surfaced in reports detailing disturbing incidents in and around youth sports. Consider these recent examples of poor sportsmanship: A high school football coach instructed his players not to shake hands with their opponents after a 22-7 playoff win in North Jersey.
SPORTS
September 27, 2000 | By Shannon Ryan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Kwesi Koomson played soccer as a boy in Ghana, winning was everything. He was taught early that there were some tricks to achieving this everything - tricks that everybody tried and nobody questioned. He knew them all. Heading the ball? "Accidentally" poke your shoulder into the nearest challenger. A defender is just ahead of you? Slow him down by casually placing your hand on his shoulder. Neck and neck with an opponent chasing a stray ball? Simply bend your knees, lower your shoulder, and when you straighten, make sure to greet him with a quick jab of your shoulder.
SPORTS
March 28, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a meeting last week inside the headquarters of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, Mark Byers sat behind two piles of paper that looked as deep and imposing as the problems they proclaimed. "These," noted Byers, the statewide high school athletic organization's assistant executive director, "are disqualifications from our soccer and football seasons. " Meanwhile, as Brian Shulman was flying here for the same meeting, he found an ad for human-growth hormone in the airline magazine.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | By Matthew Futterman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite losing his bid for Township Council in Tuesday's election, high school athletic director Charles Earling has not had a bad few weeks. In mid-October he became only the second administrator from New Jersey to be named to a select committee of the National Interscholastic Athletic Directors Association. A week later he was named New Jersey athletic director of the year. Earling is the first Washington Township High School athletic director to win the award, which honors the best of the state's more than 400 athletic directors.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
OK, we admit it. We can't stop making fun of Randy Moss. The Viking made himself such a big target. But as the big game approaches and in the spirit of sportsmanship, we'll resist for now and just say Randy, FYI, in Philly it's smart to CYA.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
With the Philadelphia skyline as a backdrop, a sailboat plies the Delaware River in the 10th annual Moshulu Cup Race. More than 30 boats in several classes competed in yesterday's race. The competitors chose the winners in each class based on performance, sportsmanship and appearance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden High School football star Sean Chandler says there's sometimes a lot of trash talking on the field. "It motivates some people and bothers some people," Chandler said. Starting this fall, athletes and coaches will be subject to new rules designed to discourage unsportsmanlike behavior, the organization that oversees high school sports in New Jersey announced Wednesday. Under a policy developed by the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association and the state Attorney General's Office and its Division on Civil Rights, officials will enforce rules designed to crack down on harassing conduct related to race, gender, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, or religion.
SPORTS
February 16, 2012 | BY BILL FLEISCHMAN, For the Daily News
TIRED OF READING negative stories involving big-time collegiate athletics? A special moment occurred during a recent Division III men's basketball game that restores one's faith that there still are really good people at the collegiate level. Gettysburg senior guard Cory Weissman scored his first collegiate point in last Saturday's Centennial Conference home game vs. Washington College (of Chestertown, Md.). The big deal is, Weissman suffered a stroke following his freshman season.
SPORTS
November 16, 2011 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
PENN STATE will leave the supportive cocoon that was Beaver Stadium last week for its first road game since the sexual abuse scandal broke. The Nittany Lions face Ohio State on Saturday in Columbus. "This week is the moment to showcase sportsmanship," Ohio State student government president Andy Messenger said yesterday, according to the Columbus Dispatch. "This is bigger than football. " Messenger and other student leaders made a special appearance and spoke to reporters before coach Luke Fickell's weekly news conference.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A see-worthy wooden pirate ship, with decks big enough to hold dozens of cheering students, was reduced to charred and shivering timbers by a suspected arson near a Bucks County high school early Thursday. The 48-foot vessel has been a familiar sight near Palisades High in Nockamixon since local contractor Scott Carr captained its creation seven years ago, said Donna Holmes, spokeswoman for the Palisades School District. The mostly black and purple ship, with gold and silver stipes, had staircases, an upper tier, and six masts, including one with a crow's nest.
SPORTS
October 28, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
In the emotional moments after his first coaching victory in nearly two years, Jarod Claybourn found a special place for the game ball. He put it in the hands of the opposing coach. "Classiest thing I've ever seen on a football field," Gateway coach Mike Karp said. Claybourn's gesture might be the coolest thing that's happened this season in South Jersey football. It definitely was the best display of sportsmanship. This was the situation on Friday night: Sterling was 0-5 and carrying a 17-game losing streak, and Gateway was 0-5 and carrying a 16-game losing streak.
SPORTS
October 2, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The battle has begun to save the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Meanwhile, the political process designed to dismantle the 92-year-old organization continues to move forward. NJSIAA executive director Steve Timko vowed Friday to "vigorously oppose" any attempt to strip the organization of oversight of high school sports in the state. Timko said members of the organization must actively work to educate the public as well as state politicians about the "tainted" nature of a State Commission of Investigation report that was issued Wednesday, as well as the "agenda" of Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D., Gloucester/Salem)
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The battle has begun to save the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Meanwhile, the political process designed to dismantle the 92-year-old organization continues to move forward. NJSIAA executive director Steve Timko vowed Friday to "vigorously oppose" any attempt to strip the organization of oversight of high school sports in the state. Timko said members of the organization must actively work to educate the public as well as state politicians about the "tainted" nature of a State Commission of Investigation report that was issued Wednesday, as well as the "agenda" of state assemblyman John Burzichelli (D., Gloucester/Salem)
NEWS
July 10, 2008 | By Kathleen Parker
If you read Monday morning's sports headlines, you learned that Rafael Nadal "dethroned" and "shocked" tennis champion Roger Federer at Wimbledon. If, on the other hand, you watched the match, you know that though one player prevailed, both men won. You also awoke Monday morning physically exhausted and emotionally spent. To watch this Wimbledon was to endure, to sweat, to grip the arms of your chair through a 4-hour, 48-minute white-knuckle contest between two giants of grace and beauty, and that other thing.
SPORTS
March 28, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a meeting last week inside the headquarters of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, Mark Byers sat behind two piles of paper that looked as deep and imposing as the problems they proclaimed. "These," noted Byers, the statewide high school athletic organization's assistant executive director, "are disqualifications from our soccer and football seasons. " Meanwhile, as Brian Shulman was flying here for the same meeting, he found an ad for human-growth hormone in the airline magazine.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
I have been watching pro sports and enjoying it for more than two decades. However, I now find myself asking "how" and "why. " The players' antics, attitudes and their obscene salaries have taken away from not only the sport but the fun of it all. I understand that the players are talented, I know that they work hard, and I expect players to get excited, but can someone please tell me why they do not respect each other and the fans? When I think back over the season, here's what I remember: brawls on the court and in the stands, over-the-top touchdown celebrations, and insulting remarks about a teammate's sexual preferences.
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