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Sportswriter

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NEWS
July 6, 1992 | By Frank Dolson, INQUIRER SPORTS EDITOR
Alex Rosen, 88, whose career as a sportswriter in this city spanned seven decades, died Friday in Fairfield, Conn. Mr. Rosen, who wrote a bowling column in The Inquirer for the last 30 years, was the antithesis of what has come to be known as the typical Philadelphia sportswriter. Through all his working years and the thousands of stories he wrote, it's doubtful he ever said or wrote an unkind word about anyone. He is perhaps best remembered for the years he spent writing scholastic sports under the name Paul Prep for the Evening Ledger.
SPORTS
December 5, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Philadelphia Tribune sportswriter Donald Hunt had an idea, wrote a column about it, and could have left it at that. His idea: Wilt Chamberlain belongs on a stamp. A big stamp, befitting the most dominant basketball player in the history of the game, an Overbrook High graduate who took the NBA record book to all sorts of heights not approached since. Hunt wrote his "From the Locker Room" column in the Tribune on Feb. 15, 2008. He pointed out that other sports greats such as Jackie Robinson and Jesse Owens had their images on stamps.
SPORTS
October 31, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
WESTON, Mass. - The lunch conversation bends toward sports and the table looks toward the former sportswriter. Kevin Mulligan often finds himself saying, "You might know more about that than I do. " Mulligan worked for more than two decades as a sportswriter at the Philadelphia Daily News. His beats included the Eagles and Big Five basketball. It just doesn't have much to do with his new life inside the Pope St. John XXIII National Seminary, where Mulligan is one of 66 men studying for the Catholic priesthood.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
David E. Wilson, 83, a retired sportswriter and copy editor at The Inquirer, died Friday at Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital. Mr. Wilson was a graduate of Central High School and Temple University, where he studied journalism and business and covered the university's teams for the school newspaper and for The Inquirer. He lived on Bryn Mawr Avenue in Lansdowne, but he was born and raised in North Philadelphia in the shadow of Temple University. George Butz, 88, a friend and fellow retired Inquirer sportswriter, said that like many young sportswriters of his day, Mr. Wilson started out in the 1920s doing what was known as "space work" - a term that meant the writer was paid according to how much space his work filled on the printed page.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stanley W. Boody, 72, a longtime sportswriter and editor for the Gloucester County Times, died Thursday of an apparent heart attack while playing golf in Odessa, Fla. He had homes in Pittsgrove and Palm Harbor, Fla. Born in Camden and raised in Deptford, he had lived in Deptford until moving to Pittsgrove 16 years ago. Mr. Boody was a sportswriter, sports editor and pro sports columnist for the Woodbury Times, now the Gloucester County Times,...
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Brown, 42, a sportswriter and columnist who competed for stories as hard as the athletes whom he covered competed on the field, died Monday at his home in Middletown, Delaware County. Mr. Brown worked for the Delaware County Daily Times from 1982 until his death. He had been battling cancer for over a year and a half, and he died while preparing to listen to Eagles coach Ray Rhodes' Monday news conference on the radio. Mr. Brown was going to write a story for the next day's paper and was also working on a story about female athletes.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert T. Paul, an amateur athlete and a former sportswriter for the Daily News, died Jan. 5. He was 87 and lived in Florida. A Daily News sportswriter from 1925 to 1942, Paul covered the Philadelphia Athletics for three World Series as a ghost writer for A's pitcher George Earnshaw in 1929, pitcher Lefty Grove in 1930 and catcher Mickey Cochrane in 1931. In an era of hard-drinking, cigar-chomping reporters, Paul was more of a "Great Gatsby" - polished, dapper and sophisticated.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank J. Callahan, a former Philadelphia Record sportswriter who found fame early as the face on the Air Force's "Uncle Sam Wants You" recruiting posters, died Saturday at Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital. He was 67 and lived in Springfield, Delaware County. He spent most of his career in advertising. During the early 1940s, Mr. Callahan's picture - outfitted with leather helmet and goggles - was featured in Army Air Force recruiting posters displayed outside the nation's post offices.
NEWS
August 12, 2002 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack McKinney, 73, a longtime Philadelphia Daily News sportswriter and columnist, as well as a television and radio commentator, died Saturday, 12 days after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Mr. McKinney, who retired from the Daily News in 1997 and lived in Lafayette Hill, died at the Chestnut Hill home of a friend. For nearly a half-century, Mr. McKinney covered and wrote about subjects as varied as boxing and opera. He loved both. In the mid-1960s and early 1970s, he did talk and interview shows on Channels 12, 17 and 29, as well as WCAU-AM and WPEN-AM radio.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Herman, harness racing's peacock of publicity and a man who knew everyone in sports from Babe Ruth to Larry Bowa, died yesterday at his home in Silver Spring, Md. He was 80. Mr. Herman was director of publicity and press relations at Brandywine Raceway in Wilmington from its opening in 1953 to his retirement in 1978. He also had been a sportswriter, covering boxing and golf for the Richmond Times Dispatch and the Washington Post in the late 1920s and 1930s. In his 50 years in sports, he came to know just about everyone who hit, passed or teed up a ball.
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SPORTS
April 20, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
My father worked nights, slept days, and rose for dinner in a mood as sour as my mother's iced tea. He usually was too tired or cranky to read the just-delivered Bulletin's sports section so my mother, as we ate, often read aloud what for him was its one indispensable element - Sandy Grady's column. Those wonderfully crafted words soothed my father, though they must also have stirred conflicting emotions in a proofreader who had wanted to be a sportswriter. For my young ears, hearing Grady's insights and flawless phrasing, so perfect in audible form, sparked the beginnings of awareness.
SPORTS
February 9, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Time was running out in Denver's Super Bowl XXXIII victory over Atlanta when the cattle drive began. Reporters, shuffling unthinkingly like barn-ward Herefords at sunset, began exiting the press box and crowding into a single elevator. Reaching the basement of the Miami stadium, we were herded - literally herded - into a gated corral. Soon the insufficient space was overflowing, the brays of unhappy, uncomfortable sportswriters mingling with the noisy postgame atmosphere. Finally, we were unpenned and marched down a narrow chute to a place where Broncos and Falcons sat in raised pulpits like gods we'd come to worship.
SPORTS
December 5, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Philadelphia Tribune sportswriter Donald Hunt had an idea, wrote a column about it, and could have left it at that. His idea: Wilt Chamberlain belongs on a stamp. A big stamp, befitting the most dominant basketball player in the history of the game, an Overbrook High graduate who took the NBA record book to all sorts of heights not approached since. Hunt wrote his "From the Locker Room" column in the Tribune on Feb. 15, 2008. He pointed out that other sports greats such as Jackie Robinson and Jesse Owens had their images on stamps.
SPORTS
December 1, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Baseball was the subject of a graphically rich ESPN SportsCenter segment last week, but it might easily have been physics. In a detailed dissection of Lorenzo Cain's best catches, the network employed such metrics as foot speed, ball acceleration, and the gradated circumferences of the area the Kansas City star and other outfielders could reasonably be expected to cover. Days later, the New York Times sports section included one story reimagining the arcane mathematical formula that gauges quarterback performance, another scrutinizing the economic and educational demographics of the most football-crazed states, and a third examining the statistics-based rationale behind the Patriots' penchant for deferring possession after successful coin tosses.
SPORTS
October 31, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
WESTON, Mass. - The lunch conversation bends toward sports and the table looks toward the former sportswriter. Kevin Mulligan often finds himself saying, "You might know more about that than I do. " Mulligan worked for more than two decades as a sportswriter at the Philadelphia Daily News. His beats included the Eagles and Big Five basketball. It just doesn't have much to do with his new life inside the Pope St. John XXIII National Seminary, where Mulligan is one of 66 men studying for the Catholic priesthood.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
I T DIDN'T TAKE a whole lot to make Jon Weir happy: his wife's spaghetti-and-meatballs dinner, a souvenir hat from a sporting event, a stroll along State Street in Media, watching his children play sports, a bike ride on the Ocean City boardwalk. For a man who was exposed as a newspaper copy editor to the frequently painful reality of breaking news for 46 years, his need for simple pleasures was understandable. Colleagues remember a devoted professional who could keep his cool even when big news was breaking on deadline, and could be counted on to get the copy out, clean and clear.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Conlin, 79, a Hall of Fame baseball columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News who retired in 2011 in disgrace amid allegations that he molested children decades earlier, died Thursday, Jan. 9, at Largo (Fla.) Medical Center. Mr. Conlin had been in failing health, including severe breathing problems, since June, said Zoe Roseman, a friend at the Shipwatch Yacht & Tennis Club, the condominium community where both lived. The sex-abuse allegations were reported by The Inquirer in December 2011, five months after Mr. Conlin received the annual J.G. Taylor Spink Award, given to him by the Baseball Writers Association of America at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Hours before the story broke, Mr. Conlin retired.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BILL FLEISCHMAN might have put it best: "Bobby Lyons was a genuine Philly sports guy. " Like many Philadelphia sportswriters, past and present, Bill Fleischman, longtime Daily News sports correspondent and auto-racing reporter, knew and respected Bobby Lyons as a consummate professional, yet one who never called much attention to himself. He was a sports reporter for the Associated Press and the old Evening Bulletin, author of several highly regarded books on different aspects of sports, former sports-information officer for La Salle University, head of its news bureau and operator of his own public-relations company.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sportswriter Bob Lyons was so organized, so diligent, that he wrote his own obituary and left it for his family to disperse to the media. Mr. Lyons, 73, an understated, dignified man who wrote several books connected to the Philadelphia sports scene, died Wednesday of heart disease. One of Mr. Lyon's five children, Rick, said his father left an obituary "not because he wanted to write it, but because he wanted it accurate. He started his career writing obituaries for the Bulletin, and he ended it writing an obituary.
SPORTS
January 5, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Five new members of the Philadelphia Big Five Hall of Fame will be inducted Jan. 25 at the Palestra. The 2013 class is St. Joseph's Marvin O'Connor and Angela Zampella; Temple's Jen Ricco; Villanova's Trish Juhline; and longtime Daily News sportswriter Phil Jasner, who will be inducted posthumously. O'Connor (1999-2002) won the Geasey Award as Big Five player of the year in 2001. He ranks 12th on the Hawks' all-time scoring list with 1,678 career points. Zampella (1997-2001)
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