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Spot Zoning

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NEWS
May 28, 1989 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Despite protests from neighbors, Buckingham Township's Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a new ordinance Wednesday to clear the way for Cold Spring Hunt, a controversial, proposed high-density, 265-house development by Toll Brothers. About 150 residents showed up to demonstrate their opposition to the development. Those who spoke argued that the board was "spot zoning," or caving in to special interests. "The Buckingham Township Civic Association has always been unalterably opposed to 'spot' zoning, particularly when the developer is the sole beneficiary," said Willard Irvin, a board member of the citizens group that was instrumental in organizing the opposition.
NEWS
February 7, 2007 | By Harris Steinberg
Competing proposals to revamp Philadelphia's 40-year-old zoning code are before City Council. These measures come none too soon and should be debated openly and vigorously. Philadelphia's zoning code is so old that nearly every development project of significance requires either a hardship variance from the Zoning Board of Adjustment or a parcel-based change in zoning by City Council. This practice is known as spot zoning, changes to the way the city regulates building use, size, height and area on a site-by-site basis.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
COUNCILMAN Frank DiCicco may be on his way out of office this year, but he's not leaving quietly. DiCicco, who decided not to run for a fifth term representing the 1st Council District, has pushed numerous measures in his last months in office favoring developments that have generated concern from some observers. They are questioning whether he's trying to make friends and connections with developers as he prepares for a career as a political consultant and lobbyist after leaving Council.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A man who lives near the proposed site of a a 500-megawatt natural-gas-fired power plant has filed a curative-amendment challenge to a township decision changing the location's zoning. The appeal by Lawrence Piasecki, who has vehemently protested the proposed plant and belongs to a local opposition group, comes about a month after the Board of Supervisors' Nov. 15 vote approving FPL Energy's preliminary sketch plans. The plant would be built next to Peco Energy Co.'s nuclear-generating station.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A developer has lost its bid to rezone the largest piece of undeveloped property in this congested area - the 136-acre Valley Forge Golf Course, just southwest of the King of Prussia mall. In a 3-0 vote yesterday, the Upper Merion Township Zoning Hearing Board denied the request of Realen Homes Inc., of Ambler, which has hopes of building two hotels, a retail shopping center, and apartments and townhouses or office space there. The decision capped 18 months of debate, including 14 hearings, over whether the course should remain zoned agricultural despite being surrounded on all sides by commercial development.
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
A developer is seeking the East Whiteland Board of Supervisors' approval for a zoning change to build 36-unit townhouses off Sugartown Road. The proposed development would encompass 3.6 acres in East Whiteland and 0.8 acres in Malvern. Developer John Mullen asked for the township planning commission's recommendation Monday night, but the commission deferred action until it received comments from Malvern officials. He takes his request to the supervisors at 8 tonight. The triangular property juts up into East Whiteland from Malvern.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
For 37 years it was used as a summer day camp, this open, green spot in Aston now surrounded by housing developments. And now its owners have entered into an agreement of sale for the land to be developed for more housing. Neighbors of the property, off Trynes Road near Concord Road, are not happy. "I want to make it clear that we (the residents) are opposed to any housing development on the tract. Aston is already overdeveloped, and the development that has taken place has been poorly planned," said one, Pat Simpson.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Tim Panaccio, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth residents may find themselves without a post office in September. In March, the U.S. Postal Service's leased building at 144 N. Narberth Ave. was sold to A&H Bloom Co., a real estate developer in Pennsauken, N.J., for $425,000. Postal Service spokesman Margaret King said the new owners had proposed a long-term lease at an increased rent to replace the current lease, which will expire Aug. 31. Negotiations are at a stalemate, and the Postal Service is seeking a short- term lease extension while advertising for a larger building, King said.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Springfield Zoning Hearing Board has rejected a resident's request for a variance to keep the raised roof on his barn. In June 1986, Alvah M. Merwin built an addition and raised the roof on his barn on his property in the 800 block of Glendalough Road in Erdenheim. Nearby residents called the building an eyesore and complained that it was so large that it obstructed their view. But Merwin had argued that the addition conformed to the legal 25-percent expansion. After a lengthy discussion Monday night on how to measure the height of the barn, board members decided that the building exceeded by 2 feet the 12-foot height limit set by township code.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com
Though opponents sang the blues about parking issues, impacts on neighborhoods, and whether all of it was legal, zoning changes for a proposed Fishtown concert venue were approved by City Council's Rules Committee yesterday. The venue will hold 2,600 to 3,000 patrons with a wraparound balcony and 105-covered parking spaces, situated along the Delaware River, north of SugarHouse Casino. The man behind the plans, David Grasso, told the Rules Committee that the area is currently a no-man's-land, where criminals go to hide out or ditch cars.
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NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, the big debate in Moorestown was whether to shatter a nearly century-old tradition by permitting the sale of liquor. In a November referendum, voters resoundingly approved ending Moorestown's days as a dry municipality. But their yes vote has stirred up a new argument that has reached beyond the affluent community to Superior Court. At issue is whether Moorestown Mall - which last week bid $1 million each for four liquor licenses to be used by mall restaurants - should have exclusive rights to pour spirits in the town.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS & JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writers
MEMBERS OF the Norris Square Civic Association accused City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez on Tuesday of trying to use her power to block a proposed housing development she opposes from being built across the street from her house. Tensions between the civic group and Quinones-Sanchez - who adamantly denied that a zoning bill she proposed was personally motivated - surfaced at a City Planning Commission meeting. The commission was debating whether to support her proposed legislation, which would allow only single-family housing to be built in one section of the North Philadelphia neighborhood.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS & JAN RANSOM, russv@phillynews.com215-854-5987
Mayor Nutter said Monday that he would veto a controversial wall-wrap bill, which City Council passed Dec. 1 despite a letter from the state saying it violates federal law and jeopardizes federal highway funding for the city. The wall wrap, planned for a building at 7th and Willow near Callowhill Street, would violate Federal Highway Administration regulations and the Highway Beautification Act because it would be within 660 feet of the Vine Street Expressway, according to the Dec. 1 letter from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine strolling through Chestnut Hill's shopping district, where quaint is the reigning aesthetic, and suddenly seeing a six-story development, including a 20,000-square-foot grocery store, hard up against Germantown Avenue. That is what Richard Snowden, a developer both praised for his dedication to historic renovation and criticized for antagonizing neighbors, wants to build where the long-vacant Magarity Ford stands. Current zoning would not allow that. To help him realize his goal of bringing a Fresh Market store, eight townhouses, plus additional retail and apartments there, Snowden has enlisted departing Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
COUNCILMAN Frank DiCicco may be on his way out of office this year, but he's not leaving quietly. DiCicco, who decided not to run for a fifth term representing the 1st Council District, has pushed numerous measures in his last months in office favoring developments that have generated concern from some observers. They are questioning whether he's trying to make friends and connections with developers as he prepares for a career as a political consultant and lobbyist after leaving Council.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Though opponents sang the blues about parking issues and the impact on neighborhoods, zoning changes for a proposed Fishtown concert venue were approved by City Council's Rules Committee yesterday. The proposed venue would hold 2,600 to 3,000 patrons with a wraparound balcony and 105 covered parking spaces, situated along the Delaware River, north of SugarHouse Casino. The man behind the plans, David Grasso, told the Rules Committee that the area is a no-man's-land where criminals go to hide out or ditch cars.
NEWS
December 2, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group fighting a proposed museum in Valley Forge National Historical Park filed a federal lawsuit yesterday against Lower Providence Township, which last month cleared the way for the project. The suit, brought by the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) and five Lower Providence residents, claims that the zoning ordinance allowing development of the American Revolution Center is invalid because it interferes with the National Park Service's ability to protect the park and its historic treasures.
NEWS
October 9, 2008 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Tuesday night, Cinda Waldbuesser carried two separate news releases into the room where the Lower Providence zoning board would decide whether to allow a museum complex to be built on private land inside Valley Forge national park. In one release, Waldbuesser, of the National Parks Conservation Association, which opposes the project, applauded the board's decision to block the development. In the other, she criticized the board's decision to let the museum complex proceed.
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