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Spot Zoning

NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
It's beginning to look as if St. George's Coptic Church may need a miracle. For more than a year now, the church, whose congregation is made up of Egyptian Christians, has been seeking to rezone a 2.5-acre site at 2004 Spring Mill Rd. in Whitemarsh from residential to institutional. The church, now at Third and Forest Avenues in Conshohocken, has outgrown the building and wants to build a new church on the Whitemarsh site. On Tuesday night, however, the Whitemarsh Township Planning Commission voted, 4-0, to recommend that the Board of Supervisors reject the church's request for the zoning change.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two recent actions - one in the courts, the other in the legislature - may bode well for opponents of a rezoning plan in the Blenheim section. This month, a Camden County Superior Court judge denied the township's request to dismiss a case filed by three residents. The homeowners are challenging state regulations on notifying property owners about rezoning in their area. The state requires that municipalities post legal notices of rezoning proposals in local newspapers. The plaintiffs say such notices don't reach enough of the people who could be affected.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
The Kennett Square Borough Council has voted to table a decision on hiring a consultant to study what type of development should be permitted on the recently rezoned Thriftway property. In February, the council voted to rezone the property in the area of West Cypress, South Washington and West Mulberry Streets from commercial to light industrial (I-2), despite a developer's efforts to build a shopping center on the 8.2-acre site. At Monday night's meeting, Councilman Elliot B. Grover moved that the consulting firm, Urban Research Development of Bethlehem, be hired to "fine- tune" what should be permitted in the light-industrial zoning.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County expects to begin constructing a regional trash-to-steam plant in Plymouth Township next year, pending completion of final legal steps in a two-year battle over Plymouth's zoning ordinances, County Commissioners Chairman Paul B. Bartle said yesterday. Bartle said the county would apply to the township today for permits to build the $107 million plant on a county-owned tract on Alan Wood Road. Construction is expected to take 33 months, he said. "We hope to begin building next year" after removing all possible legal obstacles by getting a final go-ahead from the state Supreme Court, Bartle said at a news conference.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal by the Barness Organization to construct a "tasteful" office building at the corner of Route 611 and Park Road in Warrington has been hard for nearby homeowners to swallow. Twice - at a township Planning Commission meeting and at Tuesday night's Board of Supervisors session - residents objected to a zoning change needed for the project. Barness has asked the township to rezone the property and five adjacent lots to office-residential from medium-density residential. The Planning Commission in February recommended rezoning only the 1.7-acre office site.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The West Goshen Board of Supervisors held a special public zoning hearing last week to consider the request of a Concord Road couple that their property be changed from residential to commercial. In the last year, the issue has been continued each time the couple, Adeline and John DePaolantonio, went before the supervisors asking that their 22,841 square feet of property be changed from R-4 residential to C-1 commercial. At the hearing Tuesday, the DePaolantonios' attorney, Alfred J. Tagliaferri of Norristown, said the property, which fronts on Paoli Pike across from the West Goshen Shopping Center, "represents a residential island" surrounded by commercial property.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
There was controversy in Darby Borough this week over a request for a variance to convert a vacant building in a residential neighborhood into a roofing garage and storage facility. The borough zoning board heard testimony from nine people during a three- hour hearing Tuesday that featured statements from three council members opposed to the variance and cheers and grumbles from a packed room of almost 30 people. Robert P. Allen Jr. requested the variance to operate a parking facility for his roofing business at 231 Lawrence Ave. In his testimony to the board, Allen said he would park four or five trucks in the garage but would not operate compressors or heat tar there.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Jewish Federation of South Jersey's proposed building for senior- citizen housing cannot be built except as a six-story structure, the plan's architect told the Cherry Hill Township Council last night. Project architect Peter Troast said that reducing the height of the building - as local residents and officials have requested - would add between $450,000 and $1 million to the $6.5 million cost of the project. That money cannot be raised, he said, before the project's unusual financing package falls apart at the end of this year.
NEWS
June 12, 2008 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Opponents of the American Revolution Center have filed an appeal challenging the validity of the zoning ordinance amendment that allowed the project to move forward. The appeal was filed yesterday with the Lower Providence Township Zoning Hearing Board by several residents and the National Parks Conservation Association. Thomas M. Daly, president and chief executive officer of the American Revolution Center, said he had no comment. The appeal contends that, if approved, ARC's project will interfere with Valley Forge National Historical Park's congressional mandate to manage its lands and preserve the history of Valley Forge and the American Revolution.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Springfield Township Planning Commission have expressed reluctance to recommend a zoning change that would allow medical offices to be built at 9201 Ridge Pike, adjacent to the Central Park Lodge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. A public hearing on the matter will be held March 26 before the Board of Commissioners. Three physicians affiliated with the nursing home want to build a six-unit office building on the property, which is zoned residential and on which there is a private home.
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