CollectionsSpotters
IN THE NEWS

Spotters

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | By Juan O. Tamayo, Inquirer Gulf Staff
"They're out! They're out!," field radios crackled across the front. Explosions still rumbled in the distance, and helicopter gunships were still firing at Iraqi positions inside Khafji, but the Marines of the Third Division could breathe easier now. Their artillery spotters - trapped in the town and surrounded by the enemy - had escaped to safety. Wearing black knit caps and loaded like pack mules with backpacks, automatic weapons, radios and grenade launchers, two of the spotters smiled, but looked bushed.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | By Sharon Hernes Silverman, Special to The Inquirer
Heavy thunderstorms ripped through the Chester County Library, followed by tornadoes, lightning, high winds and large hail. Don't worry, the library is still standing. The nasty weather was part of the National Weather Service's slide and film briefing April 27 for volunteer severe-weather spotters. Meteorologist Chet Henricksen said the volunteers provide a valuable service, even though severe weather doesn't affect the Philadelphia area as much as some other parts of the country.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur Paul is watching. From his outpost on a ridge in Chester County, he scans the skies for an ominous sign, for a funnel cloud that could mean danger to residents in the surrounding gray-green hills or in Philadelphia, to the east. "If I can spot a tornado, that's going to save a lot of people from being hurt, and that's what I'm interested in," said Paul, 73. The retired carpenter keeps his vigil for the National Weather Service. He is a "spotter," part of a low-tech, volunteer early-warning network that weather forecasters are trying to organize nationwide.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the sky blackens ominously and the wind howls, lithographer Edward Brady in Abington is watching. So is nurse Barbara Burger in Doylestown. And pilot Lola Tomlinson in Downingtown. And firefighter Dave Montana of Brookhaven. They are among 1,500 volunteers in the Philadelphia area - about half of them in the Pennsylvania suburbs - who serve as "severe weather spotters" for the National Weather Service. Despite decades of advancement in satellite and radar science, weather watching retains some undeniably low-tech methods for obtaining what the meteorologists call "ground truth.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | For The Inquirer / DAVID J. JACKSON
Judging by her face, Justine Robbins, 13, of Plymouth Township, thinks highly of the trampoline. Her spotters are (from left) Charles Robbins, 8, Michael Robbins, 5, and Samantha Conrad, 11.
NEWS
March 27, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Their job was once described as tramping "around and around the rooftop circuit" - all without protection from the elements. The year was 1944, and the people who patrolled in circles were members of a volunteer home-front spotter unit that had been organized under the federal Office of Civil Defense, nicknamed the Ocey-Docey. The rooftop circuit was a narrow catwalk passage on top of the six-story Farmers and Mechanics Building at Market and High Streets, the tallest structure in West Chester.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite sophisticated radar equipment that can be used in predicting weather days in advance, the National Weather Service sometimes has difficulty keeping an eye on what's happening locally - a tornado here, a golfball-size hailstone there. For three years, the Weather Service in Philadelphia has solved the problem by enlisting the help of and training about 800 "spotters," volunteers who are trained to keep a lookout for rough weather. The spotters phone the Weather Service if they see large hail, ominous cloud patterns, extremely heavy rainfall or tree limbs falling in high winds.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Ellen Hui was in the right place at the right time when torrential rains began pounding her neighborhood with some of the worst flooding Lower Bucks County ever saw. She was home, near Langhorne, with most of the half-dozen radios she uses to report extreme conditions to a National Weather Service network. "I knew it was bad when it got super dark and rainy," Hui says. "It was pretty obvious - and pretty scary. " Hui, a 47-year-old mother and businesswoman, is a weather spotter.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
Ardis Kuehne and her family like to backpack on Mount Washington in New Hampshire, where the weather is fickle. "The weather can get downright nasty up there, and it's good to know as much about it as you can," Kuehne said. The Merchantville family's interest in the outdoors and the environment led them to take weather-spotter training two years ago to teach them how to gauge wind speed and read the clouds. Ardis, her husband, William, and her son, Daniel, became part of the National Weather Service Severe Storm Spotter Network, which helps the National Weather Service issue storm warnings in time to help people.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, as a devoted listener to weather stations on the radio, James Law has noticed that the weather in Upper Oxford Township frequently differs from other parts of Chester County. When clear skies are forecast, he sometimes opens his door to find heavy rains. "It seems a lot of these reports are wrong," said Law, who has developed an interest in weather through his work as caretaker of meteorological equipment at a power station. So when Law heard about a program sponsored by the National Weather Service to train hundreds of volunteers to keep an eye out for rough weather, he signed up. About 50 residents of Chester County joined him, driving through a spring thunderstorm to attend a class in West Chester on May 5. Chet Henricksen, meteorologist in charge of the Weather Service's forecast office in Philadelphia, said that despite the millions of dollars invested in sophisticated radar equipment, severe local storms sometimes went unreported.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 19, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The sports world looks glamorous from afar. But remember, so does Heather Locklear. For all its glossy exterior, there is a seamier side to sports, one the public doesn't typically encounter. That dark world is populated by many whose jobs demand that only the bravest, lamest, dumbest, or most desperate need apply. Among them: Locker-room attendants: The plus side is they get an insider's view of pro sports. The downside is they get an insider's view of pro sports.
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - Jose Garcia stands atop a 145-foot mountain of trash, his gaze locked on the trucks dumping pile after pile of Delaware's waste just yards from his feet. His trained eye scans the landscape for anything that doesn't belong - chemical drums, slabs of asbestos, red biohazard bags carrying used bandages or syringes. Just two weeks before, one of Garcia's colleagues at Wilmington's Cherry Island Landfill discovered the body of former Pentagon official John P. Wheeler 3d as it tumbled from the back of an arriving truck.
NEWS
February 2, 2010 | By Mike Newall and Darran Simon INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The engine hiccupped and the plane started to shake. The oil pressure was dropping and they were losing altitude fast. They were going down. It was then that Frank Vogt made the quick, calm decision to land his twin-seater Cessna 152 on the northbound New Jersey Turnpike in Cherry Hill. "It wasn't the kind of morning I was expecting," said Vogt, of Oakhurst, Monmouth County, who flies traffic reporters over New Jersey. It was shortly before the morning rush hour yesterday and traffic was light.
NEWS
May 2, 2008 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want the cheapest gas around? Unless you want to go all the way to Toms River or North Jersey, you couldn't top the $3.37 for a gallon of regular yesterday at a Pennsauken Wawa (Route 73 and Remington Road) or a Burlington Hess (Mount Holly and Cadillac Roads). That's according to several Gas Buddy Web sites that cover Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. It's possible that even better deals were out there, since these reports depend on spotters trying to keep up with fluctuations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps a decade ago, few vacationers would have thought of including dolphin and whale watching in their travel plans to the Jersey Shore, favoring places like New England or Alaska for the activity. But a greater abundance of everything from humpback and finback whales to bottlenose dolphins - technically part of the whale family - in the cleaner waters off the Atlantic coast in recent years makes this excursion a must. And with plenty of boats in Atlantic and Cape May Counties offering at least once-daily trips, usually lasting two to three hours, one can easily get onboard with the idea.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"American Psycho," advertised as a wicked satire, is certainly wicked. Whether it satirizes anything important is open to question. The movie's subject and target is Patrick Bateman, the kind of status-obsessed, slick-haired, cigar-puffing Wall Street guy who loomed, briefly, as a cultural archetype in the 1980s. Bateman is a yuppie, the mythological creature so-named by trend spotters, who created the yuppie in order to provide continued long-term employment for themselves.
NEWS
March 27, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Their job was once described as tramping "around and around the rooftop circuit" - all without protection from the elements. The year was 1944, and the people who patrolled in circles were members of a volunteer home-front spotter unit that had been organized under the federal Office of Civil Defense, nicknamed the Ocey-Docey. The rooftop circuit was a narrow catwalk passage on top of the six-story Farmers and Mechanics Building at Market and High Streets, the tallest structure in West Chester.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Ellen Hui was in the right place at the right time when torrential rains began pounding her neighborhood with some of the worst flooding Lower Bucks County ever saw. She was home, near Langhorne, with most of the half-dozen radios she uses to report extreme conditions to a National Weather Service network. "I knew it was bad when it got super dark and rainy," Hui says. "It was pretty obvious - and pretty scary. " Hui, a 47-year-old mother and businesswoman, is a weather spotter.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Armed with water gauges and tips issued by the National Weather Service, a Neshaminy Creek floodwater group now needs to recruit a few good rain-spotters to activate an early-warning system. "You can have a lot of fancy things," meteorologist Walt Nickelsberg told Neshaminy Flood Water Association board members Friday as he pointed to color computer monitors showing real-time creek levels at Langhorne, and satellite photographs of the storm headed for Bucks County. "But this is the one thing that can really help," he said, lifting an index finger to his eye. Nickelsberg and other weather officials cheered the initiative of the 187-member Bucks County group to revive a citizen-run early-warning system along the volatile Neshaminy Creek.
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The deer-stalking predator reported to be roaming Bucks County may instead favor Puppy Chow. A dozen people who say they saw a mountain lion Monday near a Newtown Township church may have seen a bull mastiff dog, township police said. Police offered the theory after Chief Martin Duffy received a call yesterday morning from a man who said that he, too, thought he had spotted a mountain lion in the township two or three weeks ago. The man, whom police declined to identify, stopped his car and investigated.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|