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Spring Training

SPORTS
February 16, 2012 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two springs ago, Phillippe Aumont took the longest walk of shame a professional pitcher can take. Of the seven college kids he faced, three walked, one singled, and another bashed a three-run home run. This was an exhibition game against Florida State University, and because of that, Aumont's debut as a Phillie was never officially recorded. That hardly made the walk down the left-field line from the dugout to the Phillies clubhouse at Bright House Field any less embarrassing.
SPORTS
March 30, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Much of baseball's appeal relies on its unchanging nature. The 2015 game, between the lines at least, is virtually indistinguishable from that of 1965 or even 1915. It's a comfortable continuum that fosters, more than any other sport, generational interaction, comparisons between eras, and historical reverence. But baseball's ancient moat isn't so wide that it can exclude change completely. Right now, for example, in Clearwater, Fla., Phillies players are wrapping up a spring training their distant predecessors would have thought impossible.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - When the news broke Tuesday that Phillies righthander Roy Halladay is expected to miss six to eight weeks with a shoulder injury, one National League scout who has seen him pitch in spring training and the regular season was not surprised. Halladay was placed on the disabled list retroactive to Monday with a strain of the latissimus dorsi in his right shoulder and back. Halladay received a second opinion Wednesday after a visit with David Altchek, the New York Mets' team doctor.
SPORTS
March 8, 1988 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has long been suspected by many of you out there that nobody really needs spring training. Except maybe the Florida Council on Tourism and Trinket Sales. And just last year, along came conclusive proof that some people don't. Such as Tim Raines. Raines played for the Montreal Expos last season. Well, not for all of last season. He left out February. And March. And April. That was because he was a big- name free agent at the time and they weren't exactly in vogue during those particular months.
SPORTS
January 28, 2000 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the end of January rolls around, baseball players begin taking inventory of their body parts, making sure everything is ready for spring training. Rico Brogna began this process recently, and the answers he got back from his right knee weren't what he was hoping to hear. So Brogna, the Phillies' starting first baseman, will have arthroscopic surgery on the chronically sore knee this morning. Team physician Michael Ciccotti will perform the operation in Philadelphia. Brogna sounded confident that the surgery won't interfere with his preparation for the season.
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Coates, baseball fan and out-of-work auto mechanic, sat on a stool in a near-empty Johnny Be Good's diner and sports bar. Slowly draining a bottle of beer, he switched his attention from a televised basketball game to the muddled state of his favorite sport - and the havoc it might wreak on his hometown. "For a lot of people down here," Coates said, "spring training is the big deal. It's the only time we get to see real baseball. Take that away. . . . " Take that away and sleepy Port Charlotte and the 19 other Florida communities that host big-league teams every February and March might be in big, big trouble.
SPORTS
March 16, 2012
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Another day of spring training passed Thursday without an appearance from second baseman Chase Utley. The Phillies have played 15 Grapefruit League games and an exhibition against Florida State University without their five-time all-star second baseman, a player whose presence in the middle of the lineup will be more important than ever because of first baseman Ryan Howard's anticipated prolonged absence. You may be of the opinion that the only way to get ready to play the game of baseball is by playing the game of baseball, but at least in Utley's case, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. does not agree.
SPORTS
January 19, 1993 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The weather outside was frightful. The forecast was even worse. Lenny Dykstra, as fidgety in his spacious Main Line home one recent day as he is working a pitcher on an endless summer night, couldn't wait. Couldn't wait for the flight that since has transported him to the sunshine of Clearwater, Fla. 34617. Couldn't wait to bury the ghosts of the past two seasons, a tempestuous time littered with injuries and controversies. Couldn't wait, like a little kid on Christmas morning, to tear into the 1993 season and discover what wonders might be in store.
SPORTS
March 27, 2001 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking for a reason to believe in these 2001 Phillies? You won't find it in the starting pitching over the last three days. Over that span, Robert Person, Bruce Chen and Randy Wolf - three pitchers who are being heavily counted on this season - were tagged for 22 hits and 15 earned runs in 10 2/3 innings, and manager Larry Bowa isn't happy about it. Ah, but it's only spring training. It doesn't matter. Hakuna matata. No worries. It will all be different when the regular season starts.
NEWS
March 11, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham FOR THE INQUIRER
On Thursday, I will board a plane for a delightful string of days in balmy Florida. I love the beach, but I won't have a single bathing suit stowed in my suitcase. The purpose of my annual mid-March getaway is twofold - I go to Clearwater to watch baseball games, as many as I can fit into eight days. And I go to hang out with my dad, who taught me everything I know about being a Phillies fan. I tease him for his mercurial feelings about Phils manager Charlie Manuel and the terrible handwriting he uses when pinch-hitting for me at keeping score, as I do every game.
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