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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Talk about a production: The Wilma Theater is pulling out all stops for the groundbreaking of its new digs at the northeast corner of Broad and Spruce streets. In grand showbiz tradition, the Wilma has promised "a plethora of local actors" and a 110-piece marching band - plus a brief dramatic spectacle of unspecified authorship - for Thursday morning's historic shovel-tilting, to which you and I have been cordially invited. Historic? You betcha. The new Wilma will be the first new theater built in Center City since the Forrest went up in 1928.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
The Wilma Theater is "deep into negotiations" for a new address on Broad Street. Managing director W. Courtenay Wilson confirms that talks have been under way for some weeks with an unnamed developer to place a new 300-seat playhouse in a multi-use complex proposed for the northeast corner of Broad and Spruce streets, adjacent to the Hershey Hotel and diagonally across from the site of the new Philadelphia Orchestra concert hall. The Wilma would occupy some 22,000 square feet of space located on three floors, to include, in addition to the theater, offices, studios, a technical shop and a lobby.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2004 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to spy a stand of daffodils to catch spring fever. It starts with the first hint of balminess and continues as the urge to refresh and renew our homes becomes overpowering. To help you focus on the months ahead, consider that: March is a good time to think of what you'd like your home to be. More versatile? Perhaps your rooms can multitask. A home office can double as a guest room, a dining room as a crafts space. Consider versatile furniture, such as sleeper sofas and consoles with storage, to get you there.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the Reeds, a 1986 Mother's Day snapshot suddenly has more poignancy. There's mother Kathy standing with Michelle, then 5, and Bob, then 1 1/2. And there, just behind them, in front of the porch, is a scrawny little blue spruce, less than five feet tall. Over the years, the children grew. Michelle, 20, is in college. Bob is 16. But the tree grew faster. It got to be a lush 25 feet high. Its branches began to block the front walk. Its roots were surely threatening the septic system.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Driving along Clements Bridge Road, toward the Deptford Mall, there's not much to see. "Right now when you look at the area, it's generally blah," said Township Manager Joe Picardi. The township is planning to spruce up the area. In the coming weeks, the township will be installing 32 old-fashioned lights, 50 feet apart, along the concrete median that divides the strip off Route 42. "Clements Bridge Road is one of the main thoroughfares in the township; it's one of the first look-sees that you get of [Deptford]
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
With the weather finally permitting, Port Richmond residents spruce up the Veterans of Foreign Wars memorial at Somerset and Aramingo, getting it ready for Memorial Day. Kathleen Boyce (right) planted petunias yesterday while Dom Guarracino watered them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Installation of scaffolding began Monday in preparation for repairs to the roof, skylights, gutters, and stone facade of the Frank Furness-designed Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts building on North Broad Street. Academy officials said that slate on the mansard roof of the 1876 National Historic Landmark needed replacement, and that deteriorating flat roof surfaces, skylights, and gutters also needed repair. Some leakage into the interior has occurred, leading to plaster ceiling damage above the central stairwell.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Bob Casey urged Amtrak to spruce up 30th Street Station to welcome visitors for the papal visit this fall and the Democratic National Convention in 2016. The Pennsylvania Democrat said Wednesday he wanted more retail and dining options and nicer restrooms. No new federal money is likely to be available to speed up improvements, Casey acknowledged in a news conference at the station, but he said he hoped private funding could fill the bill. He had no estimates on costs, specifics on renovations, or possible private contributors.
FOOD
October 17, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
By the time the guests of the 90th-anniversary gala for Friends of the Wissahickon (FOW) descend on the Valley Green Inn on Oct. 25, the makeover will be complete. Walls will have been painted, art recurated, floors varnished, lighting installed, bathrooms renovated - all in all, a welcome update for the most cherished landmark of the Wissahickon Valley. It was an obvious choice for the organization to focus its anniversary efforts on the inn, says Maura McCarthy, FOW's executive director, because the inn has always been a focal point of the park.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
You don't have to go to the Shore to hit the beach. Families can enjoy a custom-built beach, boardwalk, and more at Penn's Landing Marina's new Spruce Street Harbor Park from now through Aug. 31. Visitors can stroll along an imported oceanfront boardwalk with concession stands, a shuffleboard game course, arcades, and more. Get a seat-side view on the Harbor Park's Urban Beach, with umbrellas and lounge chairs and beachlike pebble sand. On the west side of the park, stretch out and sway in the wind on oversized hammocks in the midst of trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last summer, landscape architect David Fierabend was tasked with turning a vacant lot on Broad Street into a peaceful pop-up garden for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. The best indication that his woodland garden - shaded by a copse of graceful honey locusts - had succeeded? How little visitors noticed his handiwork. "People would come in and say, 'David, you're really lucky these trees were here,' because they seemed like they belonged," said Avram Hornik of Four Corners Management, which worked on the pop-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
THREE hundred LED light strips rain colors upon grass. Dozens of rainbow-hued hammocks dangle from sweet gum trees. Seventeen-foot-tall metal sculptures send mist onto passers-by. A boardwalk offers concessions and classic arcade games. Hydrangea and coneflowers sprout from bean-shaped floating gardens. Six-by-10-foot net pods cantilever over the Delaware River, awaiting people brave enough to climb in and hang out. There's a faux pebble beach with umbrellas and old-fashioned, Atlantic City-style sling-back chairs.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
OF COURSE Tom McCusker believes he has one of the best, if not the best, Mexican eateries this side of the Rio Grande. What he didn't know, however, was that a good number of his Spruce Hill neighbors also agreed. Honest Tom's Taco Shop was named "most favorite site" in that bucolic West Philadelphia neighborhood, according to a just-released retail survey conducted by the Spruce Hill Community Association Business Attraction Committee. "I couldn't be happier about it," McCusker said of the cozy house shop on 44th Street near Spruce.
FOOD
December 20, 2013 | By Tenaya Darlington, For The Inquirer
The holiday season brings out the sort of specialty cheeses one rarely finds during spring or summer, and this time of year, all of my favorite cheeses have something to do with bark, booze, or flames. It's the season of Vacherin Mont d'Or and its American cousin, Rush Creek Reserve - two bark-bound cheeses that appear only in winter. Both are best heated gently, then turned into plunge pools for new potatoes. Then there are boozy winter finds, like Grand Marnier-infused Brie and craggy Pecorino packed in whiskey-soaked barley.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the oldest surviving botanic garden in North America, Bartram's Garden has seen more change than most. With more to come. As part of a three-year plan designed to reinvigorate its historic mission, bring back Bartram-era plants, and attract a wider audience, the 285-year-old garden on the Schuylkill in Southwest Philadelphia has embarked on the restoration of the Carr Garden, a small piece of the larger garden that, over time, devolved from...
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
MOMENTS AFTER his birth, Gary Chilutti was left for dead. Fifty-seven years later, the sadness of that fact pales in comparison to what happened next: He was found, he was loved instantly and he was wanted desperately by two wonderful couples before finally being adopted by a third wonderful couple. "I hit the jackpot with my parents," says Chilutti. "I couldn't have asked for better people. But learning about all this," he says, sifting through photos of one of the couples who'd hoped to adopt him long ago, "is just incredible.
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