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Spy

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NEWS
August 14, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"No Way Out," an action thriller starring Kevin Costner, Gene Hackman, Sean Young and Will Patton. Directed by Roger Donaldson. Screenplay by Robert Garland, based on the novel "The Big Clock. " Running time: 114 minutes. At area theaters. The morning after I saw "No Way Out," sitting at the breakfast table, I looked up at my wife and said, "Why didn't he tell Sam the whole story?" She knew exactly what I was talking about, which should tell you something about "No Way Out": it's the kind of crackling suspense drama that keeps you on the edge of your seat all the way through it, and whose plotting is so intricate that it sends you out of the theater with a burning desire to achieve a complete mastery of what you just saw. It's also the kind of movie that depends on wrenching plot twists for much of its impact, so I want to be careful not to reveal too much of the story.
NEWS
August 24, 2001
You're in one of Philadelphia's newest, choicest restaurants, when all of a sudden: "Waiter, there's a human-relations commission spy in my soup!" In an effort to find out if local restaurateurs are as diverse in their hiring practices as they are in their menu selections, the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations has sent more than 30 employees to spy on eateries. Commission executive director Lazar Kleit says visual inspections, while incomplete, will help determine if a full-scale investigation of discrimination in the restaurant industry is warranted.
NEWS
February 24, 1988
Why shouldn't librarians spy on spies skulking in their stacks? What else do they have to do besides shush noisy kids and thump rubber stamps on inkpads? And if they're not sure how to distinguish spies from other sinister people - like people who just enjoy reading, for example - well, nobody's perfect, not even librarians. So why are library officials and civil libertarians up in arms over the FBI's "Library Awareness Program"? All the FBI is asking is that librarians help combat the threat from "hostile foreign intelligence" agents who frequent libraries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
As it consists of virtually nonstop (and mostly pointless) industrial- strength cursing, a better name for Whoopi Goldberg's adventures in Jumpin' Jack Flash would be The Color Blue. The moment that best summarizes Goldberg's predicament in her first movie since her Oscar-nominated and justly praised debut in The Color Purple takes place as she flounders in the Hudson River. Her screams of panic and outrage could be attributed to (1) the corpse drifting past her nose, (2) the dubious ingredients in the water off Battery Park or (3)
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Llazar Semini, Associated Press
TIRANA, Albania - An Albanian court convicted the country's fugitive former intelligence chief Thursday of murder for the 1995 death of a suspect who was illegally detained for an alleged plot to murder Macedonia's president. The court, which tried Ilir Kumbaro in absentia, also sentenced him to 15 years in prison. The victim, businessman Remzi Hoxha, an ethnic Albanian from Macedonia, was abducted by the secret police 17 years ago along with two other suspects for allegedly planning to kill then-Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov during a visit to Albania.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A real-life spy passport used for an espionage mission carried out by the late Ian Fleming, creator of the reel-life super spy James Bond has sold at auction for five times its pre-estimated bid. The passport last week sold for $24,850 at Sotheby's Gallery in London. Fleming used the passport during World War II to travel between the United Kingdom and British military bases under a covert mission code-named "Goldeneye. " His secret mission was to set up a system to maintain communications between London and Gibraltar in the event Franco's Fascist Spain would tilt towards Nazi Germany, a shift that could have led to German control of the entrance to the Mediterranean.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
The spy thriller is a popular genre. But the real spy world is a shadowy place crammed with minutiae and ruled by routine, with about as many thrills as the library. James Bond or Jack Bauer would go crazy. CIA analyst Carrie Mathison is already crazy in Showtime's Homeland , one of the three or four best new series this season, secretly taking antipsychotic pills that her sister steals from their father, who suffers from the same mysterious condition. Insanity being a non-qualifier for tough government agents making life-and-death decisions, she keeps her condition hidden from her colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Evil is no match for Austin Powers and, it turns out, neither is Darth Maul. There was a force-out at the weekend box office, with Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me setting records while demoting Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace to second place. Mike Myers may lose his sexual appetite in his follow-up to 1997's Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, but the fan hunger for Spy exceeded Hollywood's rosiest projections. With a ballistic gross of an estimated $54.7 million, the sequel did more than squash the Star Wars prequel, which took in $25.4 million.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | BY PAUL DAVIS
As President Clinton contemplates the future of the convicted and imprisoned spy, Jonathan Jay Pollard, and in light of the case of the latest accused spy, veteran CIA officer Aldrich Ames, I'd like to say a few words about national security and treason. Pollard, a former civilian naval intelligence analyst, was one of many trusted government employees who committed espionage in 1985, which was called the, "Year of the Spy. " Pollard's case stood out from the others that year in that he did not sell secrets for cash to the Soviet Union as John Walker and others did. Rather, he was a spy for one of our allies, Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Years before Ian Fleming birthed James Bond, code name 007, author Jean Bruce sired Hubert de la Bonisseur de la Bath, French superspy and superstud of his "OSS 117" novels. Though many of the OSS books were filmed, they were forgotten once Sean Connery bonded, so to speak, with audiences. Enter French director Michel Hazanavicius, correctly suspecting that 117, a smug undercover op who enjoys a reputation for his under-the-covers work, too, might be ripe for an Austin Powers-type parody.
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NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Captain Fantastic. Viggo Mortensen stars, with an amazing group of young actors, as a radical hippie dad who has raised his kids way off the grid. When events force them to leave their rustic retreat and deal with modern-day America, the experience is jolting - and funny, moving, meaningful. R Jason Bourne. "I remember everything," says the formerly amnesiac spy guy played by Matt Damon in his return - along with director Paul Greengrass - to the Bourne series. The movie spans the globe and has the great action scenes you'd expect, but now that Bourne knows who he is, the existential underpinnings of the great franchise concept are MIA. PG-13 Our Little Sister.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I wonder whether it's possible to make a bad John le Carré movie: Every one of the 15 films and miniseries based on his espionage thrillers is well worth watching. There are the masterpieces, including Martin Ritt's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and the BBC's 1979 miniseries, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy . But even the weakest films - the 1984 terrorism romance The Little Drummer Girl and the 1990 Cold War love story The Russia House - still outstrip most spy movies.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joyce Xi doesn't want to see another family go through what hers has endured. That's why the daughter of the Temple University professor who was accused of spying for China, in charges that were then dropped, is demanding an apology from President Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch to her father and other Asian Americans wrongly charged. "I think it's important to have a public effort highlighting these injustices that my dad and others have faced, and also to be able to hold the government accountable," said Xi, 23, who graduated from Yale University on Monday with a degree in chemistry.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Jeremy Roebuck, and Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITERS
On nights when Xiaoxing Xi can't sleep, his mind races through the possibilities of what may have started it all. He thinks back to emails that could have prompted the FBI probe. About conversations that might have drawn the armed agents to his home. Through the events that left him publicly labeled a Chinese spy. It's been nearly a year since federal prosecutors accused Xi, a world renowned Temple University physicist, of selling scientific secrets with potential military applications to China.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Writer-director David Gordon Green has carved out an impressive career since his 2000 feature debut, George Washington , a moving story about a group of kids growing up in a poor rural town in North Carolina. Green followed up with a series of emotionally engaging, even raw, portraits of complex, flawed characters whose lives are touched by tragedy, including Undertow (2004), Snow Angels (2007), Joe (2013), and Manglehorn (2014). Green also is possessed of a rare comic genius - he's best known for a pair of sublimely funny stoner fantasies, Pineapple Express and Your Highness . He's at his best when he combines the tragic and the comic in his more absurdist dark comedies and social satires, including The Sitter , Prince Avalanche , Compliance - and his latest offering, the political comedy-drama Our Brand Is Crisis , an edgy, satirical look at the electoral process starring Sandra Bullock, Scoot McNairy, and Billy Bob Thornton.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Stephanie Czech Rader, 100, a spy in postwar Europe, died Thursday at he home in Alexandria, Va. She had Parkinson's disease, but the immediate cause was complications from recent surgery, said a friend, Michael Golden. Mrs. Rader was the daughter of Polish immigrants, uneducated laborers who settled in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in the early 1920s and barely spoke English. Her immersion in Polish language and culture proved critical to her success, against daunting odds, as a U.S. spy in Europe after World War II. Recruited to the Office of Strategic Services and the Strategic Services Unit of the War Department, precursors to the CIA, she was officially employed as a clerk at the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Ellen Gray, Staff Writer
LONDON SPY 10 p.m. Thursday, BBC America Boy meets boy. Boy loses boy in worst imaginable way. Boy takes on a dark and dangerous world to prove that the love of his life was real. So goes "London Spy," a five-episode heartbreak of a thriller that premieres Thursday on BBC America. Ben Whishaw ("The Hour," "Spectre") plays Danny, a worldly but not so wise young Londoner whose chance encounter with an introverted investment banker named Alex (Edward Holcroft)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2016
_ WAR & PEACE. 9 p.m. Mondays through Feb. 8, Lifetime, A&E, History Channel. It's a classic of Russian literature, spoken with the inevitable English accent (even Gillian Anderson has one), but this four-week Leo Tolstoy story, adapted by Andrew Davies ("Pride and Prejudice"), is also a splendid, sprawling romance. Lily James ("Downton Abbey") plays Natasha and Paul Dano is Pierre, who unexpectedly inherits a title and fortune but finds it can't buy happiness. _ MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IT TOOK the combination of James Bond and Charlie Brown to save the box office after a disastrous few weekends of flops. Both "Spectre" and "The Peanuts Movie" reinvigorated moviegoers who turned out in droves to check out the new fare. "Spectre" took an easy first-place spot with an estimated $73 million, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday, to become the second-biggest Bond opening of all time. The 24th film in the 53-year-old series stars Daniel Craig as 007 and cost a reported $250 million to produce.
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