IN THE NEWS

Spy

ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'You've got to get me to the tall corn," Val Kilmer says with deadpan urgency, talking into a pay phone in the midst of the film-noir hugger-mugger that is David Mamet's Spartan. An entertaining foray into a world of spy guys, stakeouts and secret government machinations, Spartan teems with the kind of terse crypto-speak that is the playwright and filmmaker's stock-in-trade. Lines that sound like old saws, but that Mamet just made up. Even an everyday "How 'bout those Sox?" (a lot of Spartan transpires in Boston)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Why is that windmill turning against the wind? In Alfred Hitchcock's delightful Foreign Correspondent (1940), a movie long on climactic moments and short on plot, it's one of the "what's wrong with this picture?" mysteries solved by investigative reporter Joel McCrea, who cracks a European spy ring while romancing Laraine Day. "Foreign Correspondent" is being screened by Film Forum/Philadelphia at the Philadelphia Center, 509 S. Broad St., at 7 and 9:15 tonight and tomorrow. Tickets: $3.50; $2.50 for members and full-time students.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | By ADRIAN LEE, Daily News Columnist
At his pre-trial interrogations in Moscow's Lefortovo Prison, Anatoly Shcharansky had to sit immersed in what he has since described as a round pool of "brilliant" light. And there, with the faces of the KGB peering in at him from the darkness outside, he had learned to recognize what his interrogators called the paper, the document, the letter. Over the 16 months he was questioned, in 1977-78, the KGB had read this letter to him almost every day. They had thrust it at him; they had rolled it up and aimed it at his head, as Shcharansky said, like a "pistol.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | By Chris Patsilelis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
THE ROAD TO OMAHA Fiction. By Robert Ludlum Random House. $23.95 Robert Ludlum's books enjoy a massive readership. Since 1971, his 14 bestselling novels of international intrigue - from The Scarletti Inheritance (1971) and The Parsifal Mosaic (1982) to The Bourne Ultimatum (1990) - have frequently appeared as Book-of-the-Month Club selections and have sold nearly 200 million copies worldwide. But one time, back in 1975, Ludlum wedged in among his spy thrillers a zany, fast-paced, uncharacteristically comic novel titled The Road to Gandolfo.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
With Republican state Rep. Fran Weston stepping down after five terms in the Legislature, the race for her seat was bound to be a hot one. But it's not even Labor Day, and already the 173rd District campaign in the Far Northeast has produced a case of Spy vs. Spy - with a shaggy (dead) dog story to boot. On Tuesday, Democratic candidate Michael McGeehan's father, Cornelius, found a man taking pictures of the front and back of his Cottman Avenue house. The younger McGeehan is opposing Republican John McHugh for Weston's old seat.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Kathy Lally, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Russia's capture of a purported U.S. spy made the news for a second day here Wednesday, as the Foreign Ministry handed the U.S. ambassador a formal protest over the affair but otherwise appeared to want to let the matter rest. The sighting of the ambassador, Michael McFaul, fleeting as it was, provided an opportunity for Russian television to dwell at length on images of unkempt wigs, wads of euros (not dollars) and a compass that officials said they found in the accused spy's bag of subterfuge.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By Paul Davis
President Clinton right now is contemplating releasing Jonathan Jay Pollard from prison. Pollard, a former civilian naval intelligence analyst, was convicted and imprisoned as a spy in 1987. This move is wrong on too many counts to list. It ignores the damage Pollard did to American security. It lets his unprincipled cynicism go unpunished. It ignores the danger into which he put the lives of many Americans. And it sends exactly the worst possible message to the rest of the world.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
A Phoenixville man who admitted using hidden cameras to spy on 34 female tenants in five apartment buildings he owned in Norristown has been sentenced to four to 10 years in prison. Thomas Daley, 47, pleaded guilty in June 2009 to putting cameras behind mirrors or in ceiling fans. The charges included invasion of privacy and related offenses, according to court records. Daley videotaped the women or watched them live on his computer at home from 1989 until September 2008, when a friend of a tenant discovered one of the cameras and told police, prosecutors said.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Is your neighbor a secret reader of Dostoevski? Does your boss have a ham radio? Do the kids peer through keyholes? Who ya gonna call? Why, Spybusters, of course. Army counterintelligence has a toll-free number - 1-800-CALL-SPY - that operates day and night. Designed for soldiers to rat on the spies in their ranks, the tip line - the only one in the federal government focusing on espionage - is open to anyone. "Of course, our agents can only investigate Army personnel," noted Faith Faircloth, spokeswoman for the Army Intelligence and Security Command in Arlington, Va. "But we will accept all calls, and if we deem it appropriate, we will forward the information to the appropriate agency.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Budding writer and spy Harriet M. Welsch, though precocious and talented, remains at the core an appropriately squirmy and sometimes obnoxious 11-year-old. That's just one pleasure of the new movie "Harriet the Spy": Its sophisticated young heroine is a character kids and parents will believe and enjoy. The film is based on Louise Fitzhugh's 1964 children's novel about Harriet, an ambitious sixth-grader who prepares for a literary career by compulsively jotting down observations in a ubiquitous notebook.
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