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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008
Q: Is there a difference between calamari and squid? My whole family enjoys fried calamari and I was told that they are interchangeable. I use a mixture of egg and bread crumbs, dipping the calamari in egg first, then bread crumbs. Is there another method for crispy calamari? - Julie V. A: The word calamari is the plural for calamaro , which is the Italian word for squid. So anyone who hasn't had too many alcoholic beverages along with their calamari would obviously think that since calamari is the Italian word for squid, they must be one in the same.
FOOD
April 15, 1998 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I have prepared squid in many different ways. However, Lee How Fook, at 219 N. 11th St. in Chinatown, has salt-baked squid that is out of this world. I would love to have the recipe - although I would go back there again and again because I think they are the best in Chinese cuisine. Ceferina S. DeHaven, Selinsgrove, Pa. Dear Ceferina, Doris and Shing Chung have owned Lee How Fook since they came to this country from Hong Kong. Chef Shing Chung is trained in the high style of Hong Kong cooking.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
This ain't no fish story. A 13-year-old boy nearly drowned after spending almost 20 minutes under water. He had fallen into a vat of squid. Twelve tons of 'em. But Jimmy Harris was lucky: It was a good thing he fell into freezing water. The extreme cold puts the body in suspended animation. Otherwise, Jimmy's heart would have stopped and his brain would have died. Fellow crew members aboard his dad's commercial fishing boat knew CPR. And the staff at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children worked round- the-clock for nearly three weeks to get Jimmy's lungs to work on their own again.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Teenage brothers entangled in the tentacles and maw of joint custody - that's The Squid and the Whale, Noah Baumbach's insightful, funny-sad memoir of divorce, intellectual style and emotional rebirth. As one who survived the epic clash of estranged parents, Baumbach has not only lived to tell the tale but has grown up with sufficient empathy to retell it with great flourish, and from the perspectives of the warriors and their collateral damage. The film title refers to a diorama at New York's Museum of Natural History where a giant squid and sperm whale are in an epic power struggle much like that of the parents here.
FOOD
June 29, 1994 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's remarkable how many diners who wouldn't touch a squid just love calamari. From upscale kitchens to beer-on-tap watering holes, calamari is appearing on menus with increased frequency. Usually served as a munchie - floured and fried with tomato-sauce dip - it is also finding its way into pasta dishes, seafood stews and salads. Squid's new-found fashionableness is due partly to its Italian calamari moniker and current emphasis on the Mediterranean diet as a healthful one. But it's also because it comes to the table incognito.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | By Sue Chastain, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Hey, dude, let's get naked. " "Can't. The rents got mundo-agro. It's been a real slice. " "Zup? Thought everything was fresh at the crib. " "This wasted dweeb in a Pontiac totaled my load. The rents are flamin' over the duckets - they won't mellow up. Really munched on me. " "Hard way to go. How about getting the posse and grabbing some za?" "Let's fan on that. Chill with you later. " It's 9 o'clock, parents. Do you know what your teenagers are talking about?
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Harris appeared pale and unsteady yesterday as he was preparing to leave St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. But for his father, James Harris, yesterday was a miracle. Just 28 days ago, the elder Harris, a commercial squid fisherman, had pulled his son out of the icy water of a squid holding tank on his boat to find him blue and without a pulse. The 13-year-old Cape May boy had accompanied his father on the vessel since he was 4. Two summers ago, he started working on the boat.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
DOWN UNDER, UNDER THE SEA GIANT SQUID LURKS NO LONGER It's one of the world's most elusive creatures. But marine scientists trolling 1,400 feet deep have caught a rare giant squid - 26 feet long and weighing nearly a ton - east of New Zealand. It has tentacles that stretch 13 feet, a 7-foot-long body and a head nearly 6 feet long. A research ship netted the squid in waters 600 miles east of New Zealand on Dec. 31. Scientists put the squid in the ship's freezer where it remained until the vessel returned to Wellington this week.
FOOD
September 25, 1988 | By Frank Rossi, Inquirer Staff Writer
This story is about squid ink and about how its time has come. But to put the thing in perspective, we first have to talk about blue M&Ms. M&Ms were invented during World War II for American bomber pilots. These guys had long flights and needed something to snack on - something that would melt in their mouths and not in their hands, if you'll excuse the commercial. The Army reasoned that bomber pilots with chocolate mess on their hands didn't win wars. In the beginning, blue M&Ms did indeed exist, bomber pilots' not being able to examine the little candies because it was hard to hit a china factory with a bomb if you were examining what was going into your mouth.
FOOD
May 25, 1994 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Consider a slice of cold lamb, an herb-sprinkled salad or ripe peach eaten at desk, home or restaurant table. Now imagine the same food served outdoors after it has been seasoned with sparkling sunshine, fresh air and a pretty view. Which do you think will taste better? The answer is obvious. So is the reason so many of us choose to do most of our entertaining at a time of year when guests can dine outdoors. On our travels to other lands, we get ravenous watching ordinary folks who routinely take their meals under sun or stars.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia going full throttle, the region's year in classical music was bound to be excellent. And it was, with particularly distinguished activity in the outlying areas involving specialists in music both ancient and modern from Chestnut Hill to Princeton. That doesn't mean everything worked out. But while lapses and misfires aren't as satisfying as successes, they can be just as interesting. Pope Francis' visit, for example . . . Most distracted concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Any artistic cutting edge can come with the sensation of falling off a cliff. The listener is bewildered for a bit, until someone (often the composer) shows how the most forbidding concoctions have precedents in the past. Rarely, though, has the road map to such precedents been established with the concrete as it was in a talk before Bhob Rainey's Axon Ladder Friday at Vox Populi. Was this an advanced calculus class? At the same time such well-known composers as Stephen Hartke and Louis Karchin unveiled their response to the visual stimuli at the Barnes Foundation in a Network for New Music concert, Rainey was at the gallery wrestling with music based on mathematical abstractions of squid neurons so big they were studied in the pre-high-tech era. Some skepticism is warranted - attention-grabbing concepts don't necessarily unleash worthy music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Giant Squid, a great homegrown goof of a show that was a dark-horse hit of the 2008 Philly Fringe festival, is back in a version that's eerier and a little less playful than the original. Yet it comes together with more polish - especially in Mark Valenzuela's spooky sound design and the lighting by David O'Connor and Terry Brennan, both aspects of the show that are essential to the fun. An earnest so-called professor (Robert DaPonte) lectures us about the giant killer squid he pursues, aided by his enormously pregnant wife (Jenna Horton, new to the cast)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Gareth Edwards, a visual-effects brainiac from Britain, has, in his writing and directing debut, delivered a deft existential road movie, a muted romance, and, above all, a sci-fi allegory with giant squidlike creatures thumping around Mexico, cutting a deadly path to the walled borders of the United States. These tendriled behemoths are the titular Monsters , and the way they yelp and moan (think distressed elephants) and overturn pickup trucks and knock down buildings is a scary thing.
NEWS
July 31, 2009 | By Michael Lewis
From the moment I left Yale and started working for Goldman Sachs, I've felt uneasy interacting with those who don't. It's not that I think less of outsiders than I did while I remained among you. It's just that I feel your envy and know that nothing I do or say will ever persuade you that I am no more than human. Thus, like many of my colleagues, I have adopted a strategy of never leaving Goldman Sachs, apart from a few brief attempts to make what outsiders call "love. " Goldman people recognize the importance of replicating themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008
Q: Is there a difference between calamari and squid? My whole family enjoys fried calamari and I was told that they are interchangeable. I use a mixture of egg and bread crumbs, dipping the calamari in egg first, then bread crumbs. Is there another method for crispy calamari? - Julie V. A: The word calamari is the plural for calamaro , which is the Italian word for squid. So anyone who hasn't had too many alcoholic beverages along with their calamari would obviously think that since calamari is the Italian word for squid, they must be one in the same.
NEWS
September 2, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seems like every year, at least one Fringe musical explores - or maybe exploits - the trials of an aspiring singer who looks for fame and love against all odds. Trite? You bet, but when it's good it connects. The Hoppers Hit the Road, about two singing brothers on a quest for the big time, is composed of a cast of Philadelphia improv actors who decided it would be fun to use a script. And it's good. If it can smooth out rough edges during this run, it will be better than that. Hoppers is classic Fringe, done with joy and a sense that everyone, audience included, is a conspirator.
NEWS
September 1, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seems like every year, at least one Fringe musical explores - or maybe exploits - the trials of an aspiring singer who looks for fame and love against all odds. Trite? You bet, but when it's good it connects. The Hoppers Hit the Road, about two singing brothers on a quest for the big time, is composed of a cast of Philadelphia improv actors who decided it would be fun to use a script. And it's good. If it can smooth out rough edges during this run, it will be better than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
FOOD IS LIKE fashion and the hemline goes up and down. Lately, it seems Contemporary Asian cuisine is on the dining runway a lot. Philadelphia's own Stephen Starr has taken his designer labels, Morimoto and Buddakan, to New York City to much acclaim. I would argue that the term "contemporary" ? which means it belongs to the same time of Asia ? really makes no sense. But I will say, despite the hoopla over Starr's Manhattan collection, Philadelphia's small neighborhood BYOB's remain the comfortable outfit for everyday wear.
FOOD
September 7, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's really only one way to skin a cuttlefish: very carefully. You want to remove the spine and the innards without spilling the ink sac. But oops! Pippo Lamberti, the exciting young chef at Positano Coast, who has gathered us together on this August afternoon so that we may learn to cook with cephalopods such as cuttlefish, squid and octopus, accidentally breaks the sac. Too bad, but not a disaster. Ink from cuttlefish (and squid) is often used to tint risotto or pasta, but that's not what Lamberti, 25, planned for today.
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