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NEWS
June 19, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Heavy fighting between Tamil rebels and government security forces in northern Sri Lanka left at least 68 people dead yesterday, including 60 guerrillas, a military source said. The violence shattered an unconditional cease-fire that had been slated to begin Saturday evening. It raised to more than 600 the total number of dead since fighting erupted a week ago, the military source said. The Tigers have been fighting for nearly 20 years for an independent state for minority Tamils, many of whom feel discriminated against by majority Sinhalese who control the top ranks of the government.
NEWS
July 3, 1986
Congratulations to Inquirer staff writer C.S. Manegold for her informed and sensitive June 15 article in which she captures the human interest aspects of the current tensions prevailing in Sri Lanka. One point that the reader may misunderstand, though, is her brief historical statement that ends with: "Tamils ultimately won back the use of the English language. " Tamil dominance in the colonial administration had nothing to do with English being the language of the administration.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is no war zone in this city. No way to tell which bus carries the time bomb, which briefcase the plastic explosives, which hotel lobby the luggage that in a single flash could blow the place into a tangle of brick and bodies. There is no line to cross, no demilitarized zone, no war. Just a restless fear. Everyone here is waiting. On Thursday, when a bomb scare gripped the city's central business district, several people were hurt as hundreds fled the area, tripping over each other, not knowing which way to run. Shopkeepers pulled closed shutters, locked up tight and joined the agitated throngs in the street.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
India has airlifted up to 6,000 troop reinforcements to Sri Lanka, airline and defense sources said today. Several domestic Indian Airlines flights were canceled or rescheduled to release a Boeing 737 to ferry troops to Sri Lanka, where Indian forces are battling Tamil rebels for final control of their Jaffna stronghold, an airline source said. A defense spokesman in New Delhi denied an airlift to Trincomalee in eastern Sri Lanka was continuing, but military sources in Madras said several flights were being operated from the south Indian city.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the bad times began, tourists by the jetload flocked to this beautiful tropical island. They came for the sun, for the palm trees, for the crashing surf and friendly people. But six years of ethnic violence and civil war have reduced the tourist flow to a trickle and nearly emptied the newly built five-star hotels. "How can we attract tourists when we are always being disrupted with strikes?" the manager of a large resort in the coastal town of Hikkaduwa said sadly last month.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
One legislator was killed, and the prime minister, five other Cabinet ministers and nine legislators were injured today when hand grenades were tossed into Parliament in an apparent assassination attempt against President Junius R. Jayewardene. Jayewardene, who was not hurt, blamed Sinhalese terrorists for the attack, which occurred just before the governing party was to discuss a new Tamil peace plan. Jayewardene and Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi signed an agreement on July 29 to end the island state's ethnic conflict.
NEWS
June 13, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Security forces arrested 50 Tamil rebels suspected in bus and rickshaw bombings this week that killed 23 people and injured 68, a military official said yesterday. For a second straight day, authorities imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew in an effort to stop a stepped-up series of terrorist attacks that began May 3. The authorities accused the 50 rebels of placing time bombs on two buses that blew up Wednesday near Trimcomalee, 155 miles northeast of the capital of Colombo, killing 22. Later Wednesday, an explosion in a rickshaw killed one person and injured 35 people at Kotahena, a suburb of Colombo.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Louis R. Carlozo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Cherry Hill pediatrician Jerry Ehrlich didn't see too many patients in his office last month, but in December, he treated 50 children with malaria, diagnosed 27 cases of pneumonia and survived a military ambush. All that happened not in Cherry Hill but in Sri Lanka, where Ehrlich recently finished a four-month stint as a medical volunteer. "There were 100, 200 government troops on the road, and they were going to blow out this straw hut village," Ehrlich recalled. "All these guys were in the ditch loading up their guns; I'm in shorts with a New York City Marathon T-shirt.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once each month, when the moon rounds its edges into a perfect sphere and a shadow of a rabbit appears on its glistening surface as a sign of the Buddha's presence, all of Sri Lanka takes the day off. Poya Day, or Day of the Full Moon, is observed as a sacred national holiday here. Banks and offices close, bars and hotels may not serve alcohol, cinemas and casinos shut down, and soap operas and Western television shows are supplanted by religious programming that features shrill songs and orange- robed monks.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bomb goes off downtown and the air fills with the smell of blood and gunpowder. A man on a motorcycle levels his pistol at a pedestrian and a politician in the south falls dead. A jeep hits a land mine and the lives of six Indian soldiers shatter in a shower of asphalt. A demonstrator raises one fist among 1,000 and he is shot in the face by an army bullet. The government warns the tourists to leave. The communists warn the bus drivers to strike. The army warns the people to stay off the streets.
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SPORTS
December 8, 2011
I GET IT. During a season when the Eagles have failed so miserably to meet their on-field expectations, it's hard for fans to get excited about their continued success off the field. When Philadelphia has been waiting for 51 years for the Eagles to bring home another NFL championship, the organization winning an international competition for commitment to community service and social change isn't going to inspire a parade down Broad Street. The award that Eagles Youth Partnership executive director Sarah Martinez-Helfman received for the organization yesterday in South Africa as the Beyond Sport Team of the Year has little resemblance to the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy as Super Bowl champion.
NEWS
November 13, 2011
By Michael Ondaatje Knopf. 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Paula Marantz Cohen     Readers familiar with Michael Ondaatje's novel The English Patient , for which he won the Man Booker Prize in 1992, will know that the excellent, Oscar-winning film adaptation of the book fell short of the original. Any attempt to represent visually what Ondaatje accomplishes with words inevitably flattens and reduces the effect. His latest novel, The Cat's Table , once again demonstrates his masterful literary gift.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Memorial to Jews defaced in Poland WARSAW, Poland - Vandals desecrated a monument marking the spot in Poland where hundreds of Jews were burned alive during World War II, scrawling "they were flammable" and a swastika on the memorial. The government, Poland's Jewish community, and Holocaust survivors on Thursday all condemned the attack on the site, one of the most notorious cases in which local people collaborated with the Nazis in killing Jews during the German wartime occupation.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Bharatha Mallawarachi, Associated Press
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka - Sri Lanka's president announced plans Thursday to lift wartime emergency laws that have curbed civil and political liberties for most of the last 30 years. The country has been under intense international pressure to sweep away the Draconian measures now that more than two years have passed since the government's victory in its civil war against separatist Tamil Tiger rebels. The emergency laws, which Parliament had extended every month, had allowed the government to detain suspects without trial, displace residents from their land, and set up ubiquitious military checkpoints.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | By CHARMAINE NORONHA, For the Associated Press
MONTREAL - For a slice of Europe's old-world charm, café culture and epicurean delights, minus the long flight and tres grande euro costs, head to Montreal. The Canadian city, actually an island in the St. Lawrence River, has maintained the culture and language established here by the first French settlers in 1642, while adding some New World ingredients. Stroll down the cobblestone streets of Old Montreal, grab a drink during "cinq a sept" (5-7 p.m., the city's version of happy hour)
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when worry and fear threaten to eclipse the comfort and joy of Christmas, Hal Taussig is defying the grim economy with the most powerful antidote he knows - generosity. Specifically, he is giving away thousands of dolls and toy bears to three local organizations whose missions he deems worthy of support. Taussig, 84, is president of Untours, an unconventional travel agency based in Media (www.untours.com). Over the years, his business has been successful enough that he could be living in a mansion and driving a Bentley.
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